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Unit 6, Period 7 Part 1DBQ Practice The New DealThis is a multi-skill practice activity which include the three skills below.From the 2015 Revised Framework:Students Will CREATE AND DEFEND AN ARGUMENT 1. Articulate a defensible claim about the past in the form of a clear and compelling thesis that evaluates the relative importance of multiple factors and recognizes disparate, diverse, orcontradictory evidence or perspectives.2. Develop and support a historical argument, including in a written essay, through a close analysis of relevant and diverse historical evidence, framing the argument and evidence around theapplication of a specific historical thinking skill (e.g., comparison, causation, patterns of continuity and change over time, or periodization).3. Evaluate evidence to explain its relevance to a claim or thesis, providing clear and consistent links between the evidence and the argument.4. Relate diverse historical evidence in a cohesive way to illustrate contradiction, corroboration, qualification, and other types of historical relationships in developing an argument.ANALYZE EVIDENCE 1. Explain the relevance of the author’s point of view, author’s purpose, audience, format or medium, and/or historical context as well as the interaction among these features, to demonstrateunderstanding of the significance of a primary source.2. Evaluate the usefulness, reliability, and/ or limitations of a primary source in answering particular historical questions.INTERPRET DOCUMENTS 1.Analyze a historian’s argument, explain how the argument has been supported through the analysis of relevant historical evidence, and evaluate the argument’s effectiveness.2.Analyze diverse historical interpretations.From the 2015 Revised DBQ Rubric for Document Analysis:1 Point: At least 6 documents used effectively to support the stated thesis or relevant argument.[Offers plausible analysis in support of stated thesis or relevant argument for all or all but one document.]1 Point: At least 4 documents analyzed effectively (author’s point of view, purpose, audience, or historical context).[Includes extended HIPP analysis (not found in source) for at least 4 documents.]From the Revised Period 7 Content OutlineKey Concept 7.1: Growth expanded opportunity, while economic instability led to new efforts to reform U.S. society and its economic system.I. C. Episodes of credit and market instability in the early 20th century, in particular the Great Depression, led to calls for a stronger financial regulatory system.III. During the 1930s, policymakers responded to the mass unemployment and social upheavals of the Great Depression by transforming the U.S. into a limited welfare state,redefining the goals and ideas of modern American liberalism.A) Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal attempted to end the Great Depression by using government power to provide relief to the poor, stimulate recovery, and reform theAmerican economy.B) Radical, union, and populist movements pushed Roosevelt toward more extensive efforts to change the American economic system, while conservatives in Congress andthe Supreme Court sought to limit the New Deal’s scope.C) Although the New Deal did not end the Depression, it left a legacy of reforms and regulatory agencies and fostered a long-term political realignment in which many ethnicgroups, African Americans, and working- class communities identified with the Democratic Party.Key Concept 7.3: Participation in a series of global conflicts propelled the United States into a position of international power while renewing domestic debates over the nation’sproper role in the world.A) The mass mobilization of American society helped end the Great Depression, and the country’s strong industrial base played a pivotal role in winning the war byequipping and provisioning allies and millions of U.S. troops.Historical Analysis Activity written by Rebecca Richardson, Allen High Schoolusing the 2015 Revised College Board APUSH Framework, released 2003 exam, and writing strategies adapted from John P. Irish, Carroll High School

Unit 6, Period 7 Part 1The New DealDirections:1.2.3.Consider the prompts below, and discuss in your group how you would approach each one. Identify the type of prompt (Comparison, Causation, Change Over Time, Periodization), and discuss how you wouldadapt your thesis formula. (You should be able to do this by now) a. Compare and contrast the programs and the policies of the Progressive reformers with those of the New Deal reformers.b. Evaluate the extent to which the New Deal was a turning point in American History.c. Evaluate the extent to which New Deal reform measures impacted the economy, the government, and society.d. Evaluate the extent to which FDR’s administration maintained continuity as well as fostered change in the role of the federal government during the Great Depression.e. Evaluate the short-term and long-term effects of the responses of FDR’s Administration to the Great Depression.f. Evaluate the major political and economic factors which lead to the implementation of policies to help solve the problems of the Great Depression.g. Evaluate the extent to which the Great Depression contributed to maintaining continuity as well as fostering change in American society in the 1930s.Choose ONE of the prompts and write a thesis. Highlight the prompt that you choose, and write your thesis in the space provided.Analyze the documents using your HIPP strategy. Discuss with your group how you would incorporate each document analysis into an essay defending your thesis.What is the primary skill being tested?What are your parameters?What is the thesis formula? How will you adapt your thesis formula in order to address your chosen prompt? (you should have this memorized by now)What is your general stand on this prompt? Remember not to “ride the fence” take a stand make an argument Keep this argument in mind when you analyze the documents!LC. X. However A and B. Therefore, Y.The formula is essentially the same for any type of question, and you can move the variables around. Below you will find some different ways to use it depending on what type of questionyou are answering. [LC add local context of your event/topic to the beginning of your introduction to “set the scene.”]Historical Causation:X least important cause or consequence, with an explanation why – linked to a theme or organizational category which will also be topic of first body paragraph; A, B 2 most important causes / consequences linked to Y,explanations why, broken into organizational categories (topics of your 2nd and 3rd body paragraphs); Y your assertion statementContinuity and Change over Time:X continuity or change, your counter-argument – linked to a theme or organizational category which will also be topic of first body paragraph; A, B continuity or change during the specified time period linked to your Y,broken into 2 organizational categories (topics of your 2nd and 3rd body paragraphs); Y your assertion statementCompare and Contrast:X more similar or different, your counter-argument – linked to a theme or organizational category which will also be topic of first body paragraph; A, B similarities or differences between the two things linked to your Y,broken up into organizational categories (topics of your 2nd and 3rd body paragraphs); Y your assertion statementPeriodization (or Take a Position):X counter argument, why something was /was not a turning point – linked to a theme or organizational category which will also be topic of first body paragraph; A, B argument, why something was a turning point brokenup into organizational categories (topics of your 2nd and 3rd body paragraphs); Y your assertion statementHistorical Analysis Activity written by Rebecca Richardson, Allen High Schoolusing the 2015 Revised College Board APUSH Framework, released 2003 exam, and writing strategies adapted from John P. Irish, Carroll High School

Unit 7, Period 7 Part 2Analyzing Evidence The New DealUse your HIPP strategy to analyze each document. REMEMBER YOUR PURPOSE is to defend your thesis or your alternate view. You need HIPP for at least 4 and analysis to defend thesis for at least 6!DOCUMENT 2Source: Meridel Lesueur, New Masses, January 1932.It's one of the great mysteries of the city where women go when they are out of work and hungry.There are not many women in the bread line. There are no flop houses for women as there are formen, where a bed can be had for a quarter or less. You don't see women lying on the floor of themission in the free flops. They obviously don't sleep . . . under newspapers in the park. There is nolaw I suppose against their being in these places but the fact is they rarely are.Yet there must be as many women out of jobs in cities and suffering extreme poverty as there aremen. What happens to them?Historical Context, Intended Audience, Author’s Purpose, or Author’s Point of View:How this document supports or contradicts your thesis:What other document(s) corroborates or contradicts this analysis?DOCUMENT 3DOCUMENT 1Source: Political Cartoon, 1933, Public DomainHistorical Context, Intended Audience, Author’s Purpose, or Author’s Point of View:Source: Letter to Senator Robert Wagner, March 7, 1934.It seems very apparent to me that the Administration at Washington is accelerating it's [sic] pace towardssocialism and communism. Nearly every public statement from Washington is against stimulation of businesswhich would in the end create employment. Everyone is sympathetic to the cause of creating more jobs andbetter wages for labor; but, a program continually promoting labor troubles, higher wages, shorter hours, andless profits for business, would seem to me to be leading us fast to a condition where the Government mustmore and more expand it's relief activities, and will lead in the end to disaster to all classes.Historical Context, Intended Audience, Author’s Purpose, or Author’s Point of View:How this document supports or contradicts your thesis:How this document supports or contradicts your thesis:What other document(s) corroborates or contradicts this analysis?What other document(s) corroborates or contradicts this analysis?Historical Analysis Activities Developed by Rebecca Richardson, Allen High Schoolusing the 2015 Revised College Board APUSH Framework, the 2003 released exam, writing strategies and reformatted prompts compiled and adapted from John P. Irish, Carroll High School

Unit 7, Period 7 Part 2Analyzing Evidence The New Deal continuedDOCUMENT 4Historical Context, Intended Audience, Author’s Purpose, or Author’s Point of View:Source: William Lloyd Garrison, Jr., "The Hand of Improvidence,"The Nation, November 14, 1934.The New Deal, being both a philosophy and a mode of action, began to find expression in diverseforms which were often contradictory. Some assisted and some retarded the recovery of industrialactivity. . . An enormous outpouring of federal money for human relief and immense sums for publicworks projects started to flow to all points of the compass. . .Six billion dollars was added to thenational debt . . . a bureaucracy in Washington grew by leaps and bounds . . . and finally, to lend thepicture the heightened academic touch, John Maynard Keynes, of Cambridge, England, . . .commenced the plan of buying Utopia for cash.How this document supports or contradicts your thesis:What other document(s) corroborates or contradicts this analysis?DOCUMENT 6 Source: Charles Evans Hughes, majority opinion, Schechter v. United States, 1935.DOCUMENT 5The question of chief importance relates to the provision of the codes to the hours and wagesof those employed . . . It is plain that these requirements are imposed in order to govern thedetails of defendants' management of their local business. The persons employed . . . arenot employed in interstate commerce. Their wages have no direct relation to interstatecommerce . . .The authority of the federal government may not be pushed to such an extreme.Historical Context, Intended Audience, Author’sPurpose, or Author’s Point of View:How this document supports or contradicts yourthesis:Historical Context, Intended Audience, Author’s Purpose, or Author’s Point of View:How this document supports or contradicts your thesis:What other document(s) corroborates or contradictsthis analysis?What other document(s) corroborates or contradicts this analysis?DOCUMENT 7Historical Context, Intended Audience, Author’sPurpose, or Author’s Point of View:Source: "The Roosevelt Record," editorial in The Crisis, November 1940.To declare that the Roosevelt administration has tried to include the Negro in nearlyevery phase of its program for the people of the nation is not to ignore the instanceswhere government policies have harmed the race. . .At Boulder Dam, for example, theadministration continued the shameful policy begun by Hoover of forbidding Negroes to live inBoulder City, the government-built town. And in its own pet project, the TVA, the administrationforbade Negroes to live in Norris, another government-built town at Norris Dam.How this document supports or contradicts yourthesis:What other document(s) corroborates or contradictsthis analysis?[The] most important contribution of the Roosevelt administration to the age-old color lineproblem in America has been its doctrine that Negroes are a part of the country and mustbe considered in any program for the country as a whole. The inevitable discriminationsnotwithstanding, this thought has been driven home in thousands of communities by athousand specific acts. For the first time in their lives, government has taken on meaning andsubstance for the Negro masses.:Historical Analysis Activities Developed by Rebecca Richardson, Allen High Schoolusing the 2015 Revised College Board APUSH Framework, the 2003 released exam, writing strategies and reformatted prompts compiled and adapted from John P. Irish, Carroll High Schoo