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Grades 2–3Short Reading Passages With Graphic Organizers to Model & Teach Key Comprehension Skills: Grades 2-3 Linda Ward Beech, Scholastic Teaching ResourcesWithShort Reading PassagesGraphic OrganizersLinda Ward BeechScholastic Inc. grants teachers permission to photocopy the reproducible activity sheets in this book for classroom use.No other part of this publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, or stored in a retrieval system, or transmittedin any form or by any means electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without written permission ofthe publisher. For information regarding permission, write to Scholastic Inc., 557 Broadway, New York, NY 10012.Edited by Mela OttaianoCover design by Brian LaRossa / Interior design by Sydney WrightInterior illustrations by Maxie ChamblissInteractive whiteboard activities developed by Adam Hyman and designed by Brian LaRossaISBN-13: 978-0-545-23455-9 / ISBN-10: 0-545-23455-7Copyright 2001, 2010 by Linda Ward Beech. All rights reserved. Published by Scholastic Inc.Printed in the U.S.A.1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 104017 16 15 14 13 12 11 10

Short Reading Passages With Graphic Organizers to Model & Teach Key Comprehension Skills: Grades 2-3 Linda Ward Beech, Scholastic Teaching ResourcesContentsIntroduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3Foreign Flags. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26Opposite Poles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27Concept Webs: Topic/Main Idea and DetailsA State Apart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28Fancy Fireworks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6Tales of Whales. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29Things to Do in Maine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7Growing Up. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30Picture a Pigeon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8Testing It Out. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31The Inside Story. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9State Stuff. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10A Fast Laugh. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11What’s for Lunch?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12So Many Symbols. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13Tracking Trains. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14Charts: ClassifyingBuilding Blocks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32Play Ball. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33Let’s Celebrate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34Shaping Up. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35Testing It Out. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15Bag Tags. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36Sequence Webs: SequenceQuilts of History. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38Hello, Island!. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16Turn on the Lights. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17Here Come the Cranes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18A Painted Cave. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19Easy Opening. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20Toys Through Time. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21Balloons on Parade. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22Testing It Out. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23Venn Diagrams: ComparingOn the Ferry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24Looking at Leaves. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25Blending In. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37Testing It Out. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39Cause-and-Effect Maps: RelationshipsSilly Laws. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40Cooling a Kampong. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41Eat and Read. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42Fool the Birds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43Excellent Elephants. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44Where the Sun Shines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45Seeing Red. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46Testing It Out. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47Answers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48

Short Reading Passages With Graphic Organizers to Model & Teach Key Comprehension Skills: Grades 2-3 Linda Ward Beech, Scholastic Teaching ResourcesIntroductionIn your hands, you hold a surefire way to engage even the most reluctant learners and build thereading comprehension skills all students need to succeed. Using the 40 short, high-interest passages inthis book, each paired with a graphic organizer that supports its text structure, you’ll find an easy wayto help students learn how to find the main idea, understand cause and effect, compare and contrast,sequence events, and more. The ready-to-use Notebook files in the Companion Folder containactivities that make it easy to model these essential reading comprehension skills on your SMARTBoard. Following your lead, students can write, highlight, and underline key text right on the board.About the Graphic Organizers{.{Many students are visual learners and can benefitgreatly from using graphic organizers with their reading.Graphic organizers are especially helpful in identifyingand sorting information. Different types of graphicorganizers are particularly suited to certain types oftext structures:W Concept webs focus on main ideas and supportingdetails.W Sequence webs focus on sequential events or stepsin a process.W Venn diagrams focus on making comparisons.W Charts focus on classifying information.W Cause-and-effect maps focus on identifyingrelationships between events.As students complete a graphic organizer, they dothe following:WWWWWcreate a visual product based on their reading engage in understanding information from a passagesee relationships among words, facts, and ideas gain a sense of purpose and control over their readinglearn to paraphrase what they readPoint out that there is often more than one way to groupinformation from a passage. Encourage students to fill ingraphic organizers using their own words and phrases.(See the example on page 4.)3{Teacher Tips {W S uggest that students read the passageall the way through to get the generalidea. Then they can reread it to identifythe information needed in the organizer.W I f students are unfamiliar with a graphicorganizer, model its use before assigningthe page. Think aloud as you read thepassage, directions, and questions, andas you fill in the organizer.WB ecause of the limited amount ofspace on each page, you may want tomake enlarged copies of some graphicorganizers for students to use. Youmay also suggest that they draw largerversions of the graphic organizers onseparate sheets of paper.WU se the MORE! activities found atthe end of each reproducible graphicorganizer page to extend and expandstudents’ learning.

Short Reading Passages With Graphic Organizers to Model & Teach Key Comprehension Skills: Grades 2-3 Linda Ward Beech, Scholastic Teaching Resourcesmantlemantle ofhot rockcrustEarth’sPartsouter corecrust onoutsideEarth’sPartsouter corebetweeninner coreand mantleinner coreinner coreat centeriron andnickelHere are two different ways students might present information.The set of activities for each type of graphic organizer progresses from easier, offering students moresupport, to more challenging, allowing students greater independence. For instance the first conceptweb (page 6) includes the topic and one detail. The final concept web (page 14), however, requiresstudents to decide what the paragraph topic is and to identify all six examples that tell about the topic.The activities in between are scaffolded to provide an appropriate level of challenge for a range ofskill levels.No matter their skill level, by building graphic organizers, students are more likely to understand andretain information for reports, quizzes, tests, and discussions. Each section of the book concludes witha page called Testing It Out, which is set up as a typical bubble-style test. The test questions are alwaysbased on the passage on the preceding page. Students can easily see the relationship between creatinga graphic organizer and using that information on a test.4

Short Reading Passages With Graphic Organizers to Model & Teach Key Comprehension Skills: Grades 2-3 Linda Ward Beech, Scholastic Teaching ResourcesHow to Use the Companion Folder and Interactive Whiteboard {{.In the Companion Folder, you’ll find five Notebook files that correspond to each section of the bookand focus on a different type of graphic organizer.Simply choose the lesson with the skill that you wantto teach. Open the appropriate file on your interactivewhiteboard and scroll to the lesson. Each lesson iscomprised of 2 slides:W a text-only slide featuring the paragraphW a graphic organizer slideIt is a good idea to preview the lesson on your computer sothat you fully understand the lesson as well as the best wayto convey it to students on the interactive whiteboard.One strategy you may find helpful is to use the colored pensin the interactive whiteboard’s pen tray to help studentswho are visual learners. For example, circling, underlining,or highlighting the main idea of a passage in green and allof the supporting details in blue is a great way to organizeinformation by color. For consistency, use the same colorsto represent a concept when completing the graphicorganizers. This will also help students who are filling inthe graphic organizer quickly identify key information ifthey need to refer back to the paragraph slide.The final slide in each file contains an interactive versionof the Testing It Out page.Other Suggestions{.{W Be sure to use the activities that work best for theability levels in your classroom.W Encourage students to explain their thinking as theycomplete the organizers.W Have students work in cooperative groups tocomplete some activities. Assign roles such as reader(one who reads the passage to the group), highlighter(one who highlights relevant parts of the passage),mapper (one who fills in the graphic organizer), andchecker (one who reviews the completed graphicorganizer to be sure it is correct). Encourage groupmembers to switch roles.5{Teacher Tips {WW hile the interactive whiteboardlessons are perfect for whole-grouplearning, you can also use the Notebookactivities for mini-lessons, small-groupinstruction, differentiated instruction,and enrichment. The additional lessonscan be printed or photocopied forin-class practice, homework, andassessment.WA s you model how to use a graphicorganizer, pass out reproducibleversions of the activity you chooseto display, along with colored pencils,pens, or highlighters. Ask studentsto mark up their own copies as theyfollow along.W T o extend learning invite students tocontinue building onto the graphicorganizer with additional informationthey may already know.

Short Reading Passages With Graphic Organizers to Model & Teach Key Comprehension Skills: Grades 2-3 Linda Ward Beech, Scholastic Teaching ResourcesName DateFancy FireworksKaboom! It’s the Fourth of July. Fireworkslight up the night. Have you ever seen awillow firework? It has long trails of colorthat float to the ground. The pinwheel andcomet are two other popular fireworks. Oneof the loudest fireworks is called the salute.After a bright flash, you hear a loud BOOM!Read the paragraph. Then answer the questions.1. Which firework has long trails of color?2. Which firework makes a loud BOOM?3. What is a popular firework?Add three more details to the web.pinwheeldetailKinds ofFireworkstopicWhat do you think a pinwheel firework lookslike? Draw a picture to show your ideas.6

Short Reading Passages With Graphic Organizers to Model & Teach Key Comprehension Skills: Grades 2-3 Linda Ward Beech, Scholastic Teaching ResourcesName DateThings to Do in MaineMaine has 2,500 lakes and ponds for summerfun. There are more than 400 islands alongthe coast. People swim, fish, and sail offthese islands. Visitors enjoy eating in Maine,too. The state grows most of the blueberriesin the United States. In Maine, you can eatblueberry pie and lobster all summer long!Read the paragraph. Then answer the questions.1. What does Maine have along its coast?2. What fruit does Maine grow?3. What other food is Maine known for?Add three more details to the web.2,500 lakesand pondsdetailWhy PeopleGo to MainetopicFind Maine on a mapof the United States.7

Short Reading Passages With Graphic Organizers to Model & Teach Key Comprehension Skills: Grades 2-3 Linda Ward Beech, Scholastic Teaching ResourcesName DatePicture a PigeonWhat’s a city bird like? Many ofthe birds that live in cities arepigeons. These birds are usuallyfound on city sidewalks andon building rooftops. A pigeonweighs about half a pound. It canfly up to 60 miles an hour. Mostpigeons live for 10 to 15 years.Read the paragraph. Then answer the questions.1. How much does a pigeon weigh?2. How fast can a pigeon fly?3. How long does a pigeon live?Add three more details to the web.sidewalks androoftopsdetailPigeons inthe CitytopicBaby pigeons are called squabs.Add this fact to the web.8

Short Reading Passages With Graphic Organizers to Model & Teach Key Comprehension Skills: Grades 2-3 Linda Ward Beech, Scholastic Teaching ResourcesName DateThe Inside StoryYou live on the outside of Earth.This part of our planet is called thecrust. What is the inside of Earthlike? Just below the crust is themantle. It is made up of hot rock.Next comes the outer core. The innercore is the very center of Earth. Boththe outer and inner cores are made oftwo minerals—iron and nickel.outer corecrustmantleinner coreRead the topic in the web. Find fourdetails in the paragraph that tellabout the topic. Add them to the web.detailEarth’s PartstopicUse the web to tell someone aboutthe different parts of Earth.9

Short Reading Passages With Graphic Organizers to