Whale Tales

Whale Tales

WHALE TALES LESSON 11 Wave, Tide or Ride, Follow The Guide Created by MDCPS Physical Education Department Lesson 11 Wave, Tide or Ride, Follow the Guide Describe the features of a waterpark. Explain how to stay safe at a waterpark. Demonstrate the correct riding position for a water slide. Describe the features of a waterfront. Name three different types of waterfront. Define surf beach. Explain how to stay safe at a waterfront. Define rip current. Understand how to swim in a rip current. Catch pool: A landing pool located at the bottom of a water slide. Current: The continuous movement of water. Dispatcher: The lifeguard at the top of a water slide who is responsible for starting riders at the correct time to prevent injuries.

Flume: A narrow channel that carries a stream of water. Free-fall drop slide: A steep slide that appears to drop straight down. Speeds can reach about 30 miles per hour or more. The bottom of the slide levels off and has a slowing-down section. Rip current: Powerful currents of water flowing away from shore. Rip currents can occur at any beach with breaking waves, including the Great Lakes. Rapids: A section of a river where the water moves very fast. Sometimes the water splashes and creates bubbles (whitewater). Run-out: A slow-down section at the end of a water slide. Surf beaches: Beaches with breaking waves. Tide: The regular rise and fall of the level of the ocean that is caused by the pull of the moon and the sun. Traditional pool: A swimming pool that is shaped in an L or a rectangle, has a shallow end that gradually slopes to a deep end and has no moving water or special features. Waterfront: A natural water environment, such as an ocean, river, lake or pond. Waterpark: A theme park featuring many types of water attractions, such as wave pools, water slides and winding rivers. Winding river: A long, narrow, shallow pool that flows like a river. The current is usually slow and people ride along on rafts or tubes. Usually designed in a winding path that allows riders to go around the river and return to where they started. Zero depth: A gradually sloping entry and exit point. In a waterpark, it is the shallow end of the wave pool where the water meets the concrete, allowing people to walk into the pool as they would walk into a lake or the ocean.

Key Terms Introduction Many people learn to swim at a traditional swimming pool, such as the YMCA or a public pool. A traditional swimming pool: Is often a rectangle or L shape. Has a shallow end that gradually slopes to a deep end. Has no moving water. There are other great places that can be designated swimming areas, such as waterparks, lakes, rivers and oceans. Remember, a designated swimming area is an area that has been checked for safe conditions, such as being free of debris and water quality being acceptable for swimming. A designated swimming area is supervised by a lifeguard. Before heading out to a swimming area, the best thing anyone can do to stay safe is to learn how to swim. The American Red Cross has swimming courses for people of any age and swimming ability. To enroll in a swimming course, go to redcross.org and search for swim lessons in your area or check with a local aquatic facility and ask for Red Cross swim lessons. When you go to a new swimming area, there are some things you should do to be water smart: Read and obey all posted signs. The rules are there to keep you safe. Never swim alone or in unsupervised places. Remember Longfellows rule: Swim as a Pair Near a Lifeguards Chair. Learn about the features of the attractions or rides at a waterpark. Learn about swimming in a waterfront area such as a lake, river or ocean.

What is a Waterpark? Have you ever been to a waterpark? Answer: Allow time for responses. What kind of theme did it have? Answer: Responses will vary, but may include the following: Tropical island c Ice mountains c Pirate island Jungle safari What types of rides did you go on? Answer: Responses may include the following: Winding rivers Wave pools Various slides Spray fountains Splash pads A waterpark is a theme park that features many types of water attractions, such as wave pools, water slides and winding rivers. Waterparks are very different from traditional pools. Waterparks can have different types of moving water. Many of the rides copy nature. For example: A winding river is a long, narrow shallow pool that flows like a river. The current is usually slow and people ride along on rafts or tubes. A wave pool is a pool that has waves similar to ocean waves. River rapids are designed to be similar to the part of a river where the current is fast and splashing water creates white water.

Be Water Smart at the Waterpark Waterpark rides are designed to be fun and exciting. Many people who go to a waterpark are there for the first time. They may not know about waterpark rides and attractions. Often they are so excited that they do not read the rules and procedures. Although ride manufacturers spend many hours developing the safest procedures for the rides, people must do their part to be water smart. They must follow the procedures and rules to remain safe. Safety procedures may include: The type of clothing worn. The correct position to be in. How people get on the ride. How people exit the ride. The amount of time between riders. Some safety rules you might see at a waterpark include: Remain in the tube at all times on a winding river. Get and stay in the proper position when going down a water slide. Always enter a wave pool from the zero depth; do not jump in from the side. (Zero depth is the shallow end of the pool where the water meets the concrete. It allows people to walk into the pool the way you walk into the ocean or a lake.) Some rides or attractions have height or weight requirements to make sure a person is able to safely use the ride. Some rides or attractions require strong swimming skills. If the attraction has a strong current or large waves, this could cause trouble for someone who is not a strong swimmer Water Slides

Popular attractions at waterparks are the water slides. A water slide is a large slide that has water running down it and slides into a landing pool, or catch pool. A free-fall drop slide (also called a speed slide) is a steep slide that appears to drop straight down. Speeds can reach about 30 miles per hour or more. The bottom of the slide levels off and has a slowing down section, or run-out, at the end of the ride. Some slides have a series of bumps and dips. Some slides have curves. Another word for water slide is flume, which is a narrow passage that has water flowing through it. Lets talk about rules and procedures for a water slide. Lifeguards are positioned in different places on the slide. The lifeguard at the top is called the dispatcher. He or she: Makes sure the rider gets into the slide correctly. Makes sure the rider starts down the slide only when it is safe to do so. Enforces height and weight restrictions. Height restrictions make sure riders have the body control to ride safely. Weight restrictions make sure riders come down the slide at a safe speed. The lifeguard at the bottom of the slide is called the run-out or catch pool lifeguard. The catch pool lifeguard: Signals to the dispatcher when to send the next rider. Watches riders carefully as they exit the slide. Gives directions about how to exit the slide. Assists any riders who have difficulty. How to Ride a Water Slide

The proper riding position for a slide is face-up and feet-first. c On some water slides, you sit on a mat or a tube. c For a speed slide, you lie down, cross your arms over your chest and cross your ankles. Now I will tell you certain things that are not permitted on most water slides, and you tell me why you think that item is not permitted. Swim suits with metal objects Answer: They can create scratches on the slide and could cause injuries to riders. Loose eyeglasses, including sunglasses Answer: They can fly off and become lost. Masks and goggles

Answer: They can cause injury resulting from the force created on the slide or by hitting the slide. Life jackets and other flotation devices Answer: They can interfere with proper body position for riding the slide. Shoes Answer: They can cause injury by sticking to the slide or the bottom of the catch pool. Activity Place several mats on the floor. Have students demonstrate the correct riding position for a speed slide (lying on the back, feet-first, legs crossed at ankles, arms crossed over chest). Be Water Smart at the Waterfront A waterfront is a natural water environment, such as an ocean, river, lake or pond.

You should swim only in natural areas that are designated for swimming and protected by a lifeguard. Rivers Key Points The water in rivers is constantly flowing downstream. Because the water is moving, a swimmer may get into trouble. Anyone accidentally caught in a strong current should turn onto his or her back and float downstream feetfirst. Once out of the current, swim or wade straight toward shore. And remember, swim in designated swimming areas only. Lakes and Ponds

Key Points Lakes and ponds are popular swimming areas. The main hazard is murky (dark) water. This makes it difficult to see below the surface. It may be difficult to know the depth of the water, making these areas unsafe for diving. The bottom of lakes and ponds often contain hidden hazards, such as rocks, plants or weeds, sunken logs or broken glass that can cause injury. Be water smart and swim only in designated swimming areas. Be Water Smart at the Waterfront Oceans

Key Points Ocean swimming is a lot of fun because there are waves you can ride. The water level rises and falls every day. This is the tide. The water moves all the time. It is important to understand the ocean before you swim in it. Surf Beach Safety Does anyone know what a surf beach is? Answer: Beaches with breaking waves are called surf beaches. Surf beaches can be fun, but even in designated swimming areas, waves can become quite large. Breaking waves are very powerful and are capable of moving large objects. Waves can be strong enough to knock you over. To stay safe at a surf beach: Learn how to swim well. Get instructions about swimming at a surf beach from a lifeguard or swim instructor who has experience at surf beaches. Never swim alone. Always swim at a beach protected by lifeguards. Check with lifeguards before entering the water to learn about the current conditions. Obey all instructions and orders from lifeguards.

Sometimes lifeguards will post signs or flags. Learn what the signs and flags mean before you enter the water. Rip Currents One main hazard at a surf beach is a rip current. Rip currents are powerful currents of water flowing away from shore. A rip current moves straight out to sea beyond the breaking waves. Rip currents can occur at any beach with breaking waves (surf), including the Great Lakes. There are clues to look for that may let you know that rip currents might be present: A narrow strip of choppy water An area where the water color is clearly different A line of foam, seaweed or debris that steadily moves out to sea It is difficult for most people to be able to tell if rip currents are present, and the clues are very hard to identify. Do not assume that if you do not see one or more of the clues that there are no rip currents. Swimmers who are caught in a rip current cannot make any progress as they try to swim to shore. They sometimes panic, which makes the problem even worse. What to do if you get caught in a rip current: Dont panic. Swim along the shore until you are out of the current. Then turn and swim toward the shore. If you cant escape the current, float or tread water. If you are too tired to swim, face the shore and wave your arms or call for help. Do you think swimming at a beach with breaking waves that is protected by lifeguards is safer than swimming at a beach that is not protected by lifeguards? Why or why not?

Answer: Yes. Lifeguards warn patrons of any unusual or hazardous conditions. Lifeguards can also help you if you need assistance. Waterpark or Waterfront Ask students, Which type of swimming area would you like to go to and why? Answer: Allow time for responses. Hand out a piece of drawing paper to each student. Tell students to draw a picture of themselves having fun at a waterpark or waterfront. Give students time to draw their pictures. Ask, Do you have a buddy with you in your picture? Answer: If they answer Yes, tell them that they made a good and wise choice to have a buddy. If they answer No, have them add a buddy to their picture. Ask, Are lifeguards in your picture? Answer: Their pictures should show lifeguards either in elevated chairs (at a lake or ocean) or at the catch pool or top of a water slide or ride at a waterpark. Ask, Are there rules posted in your picture? Answer: Signs and height restriction signs should be posted at the entrance and at the beginning of the ride at a waterpark. Rules should be posted near the lifeguard at a waterfront environment. Ask, Is there rescue equipment in your picture? Answer: Some of the following should be in their pictures: Ring buoy Reaching pole First aid kit Rescue buoys

Rescue tubes Backboard Review You should swim only in designated swimming areas. What is a designated swimming area? Answer: An area that has been checked for safe swimming and is supervised by a lifeguard. Before you go to a new swimming area, you should learn things about the area so you can be water smart. You should learn what to expect and how to stay safe. Which basic water safety rules should you remember before you head out to any swimming area? Answer: Responses should include the following: Learn to swim well. Read and obey all posted signs. The rules are there to keep you safe.

Never swim alone or in unsupervised places. Remember Longfellows rule: Swim as a Pair Near a Lifeguards Chair. Make sure you know where the lifeguards are stationed. Remember that swimming at a surf beach is different from swimming in a pool or lake and that you should receive instruction before going in. Know about the features of any swimming area, including waterpark attractions or rides, before getting in. Remember, wave, tide or ride, follow the guide!

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