Urban Land-Use Theories - Leaving Certificate Geography

Urban Land-Use Theories - Leaving Certificate Geography

Urban LandUse Theories 6th year Geography Three key theories Burgess Hoyt Concentric Zone Sector Model Harris

and Ullman Multiple Nuclei Urban Land-Use Theories Concentric Zone Theory Burgess (1925)

Cities grow outwards from the centre in a series of rings. Concentric Zone Theory Timeframe 1920s Class conscious society Housing segregated according to income Lack of transport infrastructure

Assumptions Older buildings in city centre

Newer buildings at edge of city Land values highest in city centre Strong economic and ethnic segregation Low income groups lack transport and live close to city centre. Cities develop on a flat plain with equal access to transport

Five Concentric Zones 1) Central Business District 2) Transition and Industry low incomes oldest housing ghettos

3) Low Income Residential 4) Middle Income Residential suburban estatesgood quality, gardens 5) High Income Residential / Commuter Small towns and villages

Problems with Burgess Model Old Doesn't consider car ownership Landscape not considered Impact that industry and transport could have on land use not considered. Zones are never as clear-cut

Hoyts Sector Model 1939 Sectors radiating out from the CBD along transport routes. Sector Theory Timeframe Late 1930s Income and status divided

society Housing areas reflect social segregation Assumptions Settlement develops along transport routes

Towns radiate out from the CBD Low-income and industrial areas lie next to each other Wealthy people choose the best sites Criticisms of Hoyts Theory Old Too

In general reality, most zones contain more than one land- use Doesn't consider the impact of urban renewal schemes

Burgess v Hoyt Hoyts theory is based on statistical data, so is less open to the criticism that Burgess received. Harris and Ullmans Multiple Nuclei Theory

1945 As an urban area grows, it develops around a number of different business centres or nuclei. Multiple Nuclei Theory Assumptions; Modern cities more complex than

suggested by other theorists Each nucleus acts as a growth point Growth occurs outwards from each nucleus, until they all merge into one large urban area Multiple Nuclei Theory Mixture Shows of Burgess and Hoyt

some land-uses attract more of the same, for example industrial areas Some land-uses may deter others from locating nearby, eg; housing is usually located away from industrial areas Criticisms of Multiple Nuclei Theory

Not an exact fit for all cities and towns Too complex Are these models relevant to todays cities?? Have

Now some relevance due to urban renewal schemes and changes in society, high income residential areas often exist close to the CBD Modern cities are expanding beyond these

models- Urban Sprawl Exam Question Examine briefly one theoretical model which attempts to explain the development of land use zones in a developed world city. (30 marks)

Recently Viewed Presentations

  • Classification of Matter (1.6) - Amazon S3

    Classification of Matter (1.6) - Amazon S3

    Classification of Matter (1.6) Periodic Table of Elements Homogenous Mixtures Colloid - Milk left out A colloid is a solution that has particles ranging between 1 and 1000 nanometers in diameter, yet are still able to remain evenly distributed throughout...
  • *Nothing contained herein is intended to be legal

    *Nothing contained herein is intended to be legal

    A Clearwater, FL mansion, designed by a student of Frank Lloyd Wright, is also . available to be purchased with Bitcoin. Nehad Alhassan is marketing the sale of the 4,000-square-foot home. Alhassan noted that since there are so few agents...
  • Rostow's Development Model - mr. clark's guide to geography

    Rostow's Development Model - mr. clark's guide to geography

    Rostow's. Model of Development. The Traditional Society. High percentage of people in agriculture. Limited technology. Much of country's wealth allocated to "nonproductive" activities such as military and religion. The Preconditions for Takeoff.
  • 1 - SAGE Publications

    1 - SAGE Publications

    No neutral empirical data, observations theory-laden. No certain foundations. Historical fallibility of theories (theories, facts are man-made). Science more than theories. Correspondence implausible. Relativism. Self-defeating. Relative to what? (nations, cultures, tribes). Incommensurability not plausible. Science more than language ...
  • Business Process Reengineering BPR

    Business Process Reengineering BPR

    Frequency One shot Scope Broad, cross-functional Participation Top-Down Risk and rewards High Type of change Structure, culture roles Role of IT Key enabler BPR Prof. Dr Majed El-Farra * Fundamentals of BPR 2- Process: A set of logically related tasks...
  • Traps and Attractants for Monitoring Bed Bugs

    Traps and Attractants for Monitoring Bed Bugs

    Traps and Attractants for Monitoring Bed Bug Infestations G. W. Bennett, C. Wang, G. McGraw, M. Abou El-Nour Department of Entomology, Purdue University West Lafayette, IN S. McKnight BioSensory, Inc. Putnam, CT Why study bed bug traps and attractants?
  • ERO Portal Overview and CFR Portal Training

    ERO Portal Overview and CFR Portal Training

    When CFR has been submitted to Region and Region has sent CFR back with comments. View only (no ability to make updates) When CFR has been submitted to Region and Region has accepted the CFR. View only (no ability to...
  • State Enterprise Center of Registers Institutional System of

    State Enterprise Center of Registers Institutional System of

    Historical development of Institutional System of Immovable Property Registration Present institutional system and area of its responsibility State Enterprise Center of Registers, its functions System of Cadastre and Registy of immovable property Development of e-services 1992 - Establishment of the...