Introduction to Computing and Programming in Python: A

Introduction to Computing and Programming in Python: A

Introduction to Computing and Programming in Python: A Multimedia Approach Chapter 5: Advanced Picture Techniques Tuning our color replacement If you want to get more of Barbs hair, just increasing the threshold doesnt work Wood behind becomes within the threshold value

How could we do it better? Lower our threshold, but then miss some of the hair Work only within a range Replacing colors in a range Get the range using MediaTools def turnRedInRange(): brown = makeColor(57,16,8) file=r"C:\Documents and Settings\Mark Guzdial\My

Documents\mediasources\barbara.jpg" picture=makePicture(file) for x in range(70,168): for y in range(56,190): px=getPixel(picture,x,y) color = getColor(px) if distance(color,brown)<50.0: redness=getRed(px)*1.5 setRed(px,redness) show(picture) return(picture) Walking this code Like last time: Dont need input, same color we want to change, same file, make a picture

def turnRedInRange(): brown = makeColor(57,16,8) file=r"C:\Documents and Settings\Mark Guzdial\My Documents\mediasources\barbara.jpg" picture=makePicture(file) for x in range(70,168): for y in range(56,190): px=getPixel(picture,x,y) color = getColor(px) if distance(color,brown)<50.0: redness=getRed(px)*1.5 setRed(px,redness) show(picture) return(picture) The nested loop

I used MediaTools to find the rectangle where most of the hair is that I want to change def turnRedInRange(): brown = makeColor(57,16,8) file=r"C:\Documents and Settings\Mark Guzdial\My Documents\mediasources\barbara.jpg" picture=makePicture(file) for x in range(70,168): for y in range(56,190): px=getPixel(picture,x,y) color = getColor(px) if distance(color,brown)<50.0: redness=getRed(px)*1.5 setRed(px,redness)

show(picture) return(picture) Same thing as last time (could raise threshold now) Then were looking for a close-match on hair color, and increasing the redness def turnRedInRange(): brown = makeColor(57,16,8) file=r"C:\Documents and Settings\Mark Guzdial\My Documents\mediasources\barbara.jpg" picture=makePicture(file) for x in range(70,168): for y in range(56,190):

px=getPixel(picture,x,y) color = getColor(px) if distance(color,brown)<50.0: redness=getRed(px)*1.5 setRed(px,redness) show(picture) return(picture) Could we do this without nested loops? Yes, but complicated IF def turnRedInRange2():

brown = makeColor(57,16,8) file=r"C:\Documents and Settings\Mark Guzdial\My Documents\mediasources\barbara.jpg" picture=makePicture(file) for p in getPixels(picture): x = getX(p) y = getY(p) if x >= 70 and x < 168: if y >=56 and y < 190: color = getColor(p) if distance(color,brown)<100.0: redness=getRed(p)*2.0 setRed(p,redness) show(picture) return picture Working on Katies Hair

def turnRed(): brown = makeColor(42,25,15) file="C:/ip-book/mediasources/katieFancy.jpg" picture=makePicture(file) for px in getPixels(picture): color = getColor(px) if distance(color,brown)<50.0: redness=int(getRed(px)*2) blueness=getBlue(px) greenness=getGreen(px) setColor(px,makeColor(redness,blueness,greenness)) show(picture) return(picture) This version doubles all close reds.

Notice the couch. Working on Katies hair, in a range def turnRedInRange(): brown = makeColor(42,25,15) file="C:/ip-book/mediasources/katieFancy.jpg" picture=makePicture(file) for x in range(63,125): for y in range(6,76): px=getPixel(picture,x,y) color = getColor(px) if distance(color,brown)<50.0: redness=int(getRed(px)*2) blueness=getBlue(px) greenness=getGreen(px) setColor(px,makeColor(redness,blueness,greenness))

show(picture) return(picture) Left is one we did with all close browns. Right is same, but only in rect around head. Removing Red Eye When the flash of the camera catches the eye just right

(especially with light colored eyes), we get bounce back from the back of the retina. This results in red eye We can replace the red with a color of our choosing. First, we figure out where the eyes are (x,y) using MediaTools Removing Red Eye def removeRedEye(pic,startX,startY,endX,endY,replacementcolor): red = makeColor(255,0,0) for x in range(startX,endX): Why use a for y in range(startY,endY): range? Because

currentPixel = getPixel(pic,x,y) we dont want to if (distance(red,getColor(currentPixel)) < 165): replace her red setColor(currentPixel,replacementcolor) dress! What were doing here: Within the rectangle of pixels (startX,startY) to (endX, endY) Find pixels close to red, then replace them with a new color Fixing it: Changing red to black removeRedEye(jenny, 109, 91, 202, 107,

makeColor(0,0,0)) Jennys eyes are actually not blackcould fix that Eye are also not mono-color A better function would handle gradations of red and replace with gradations of the right eye color Replacing colors using IF We dont have to do one-to-one changes or replacements of color

We can use if to decide if we want to make a change. We could look for a range of colors, or one specific color. We could use an operation (like multiplication) to set the new color, or we can set it to a specific value. It all depends on the effect that we want. Posterizing: Reducing range of colors

Posterizing: How we do it We look for a range of colors, then map them to a single color. If red is between 63 and 128, set it to 95 If green is less than 64, set it to 31 ...

It requires a lot of if statements, but its really pretty simple. The end result is that a bunch of different colors, get set to a few colors. Posterizing function def posterize(picture): #loop through the pixels for p in getPixels(picture): #get the RGB values red = getRed(p) green = getGreen(p) blue = getBlue(p) #check and set red values if(red < 64): setRed(p, 31) if(red > 63 and red < 128):

setRed(p, 95) if(red > 127 and red < 192): setRed(p, 159) if(red > 191 and red < 256): setRed(p, 223) #check and set green values if(green < 64): setGreen(p, 31) if(green > 63 and green < 128): setGreen(p, 95) if(green > 127 and green < 192): setGreen(p, 159) if(green > 191 and green < 256): setGreen(p, 223) #check and set blue values if(blue < 64):

setBlue(p, 31) if(blue > 63 and blue < 128): setBlue(p, 95) if(blue > 127 and blue < 192): setBlue(p, 159) if(blue > 191 and blue < 256): setBlue(p, 223) Whats with this # stuff? Any line that starts with a # is ignored by Python. This allows you to insert comments: Notes to yourself (or another programmer) that explains

whats going on here. When programs get longer, there are lots of pieces to them, and its hard to figure out what each piece does. Comments can help. Posterizing to b/w levels def grayPosterize(pic): for p in getPixels(pic): r = getRed(p) g = getGreen(p) b = getBlue(p) luminance = (r+g+b)/3 if luminance < 64: setColor(p,black)

if luminance >= 64: setColor(p,white) We check luminance on each pixel. If its low enough, its black, and Otherwise, its white Generating sepia-toned prints Pictures that are sepia-toned have a yellowish tint

to them that we associate with older pictures. Its not directly a matter of simply increasing the yellow in the picture, because its not a one-toone correspondence. Instead, colors in different ranges get mapped to other colors. We can create such a mapping using IF Example of sepia-toned prints Heres how we do it def sepiaTint(picture): #Convert image to greyscale greyScaleNew(picture) #loop through picture to tint pixels

for p in getPixels(picture): red = getRed(p) blue = getBlue(p) #tint shadows if (red < 63): red = red*1.1 blue = blue*0.9 #tint midtones if (red > 62 and red < 192): red = red*1.15 blue = blue*0.85 #tint highlights if (red > 191): red = red*1.08 if (red > 255): red = 255

blue = blue*0.93 #set the new color values setBlue(p, blue) setRed(p, red) Whats going on here? First, were calling greyScaleNew (the one with weights). We then manipulate the red (increasing) and the blue (decreasing) channels to bring out more yellows and oranges.

Its perfectly okay to have one function calling another. Why are we doing the comparisons on the red? Why not? After greyscale conversion, all channels are the same! Why these values? Trial-and-error: Twiddling the values until it looks the way that you want. Blurring When we scale up pictures

(make them bigger), we get sharp lines and boxes: pixelation. Can reduce that by purposefully blurring the image. One simple algorithm: Take the pixels left, right, bottom, and top of yours. Average the colors. Blurring code def blur(filename): source=makePicture(filename) target=makePicture(filename)

for x in range(0, getWidth(source)-1): for y in range(0, getHeight(source)-1): top = getPixel(source,x,y-1) left = getPixel(source,x-1,y) bottom = getPixel(source,x,y+1) right = getPixel(source,x+1,y) center = getPixel(target,x,y) newRed=(getRed(top)+ getRed(left)+ getRed(bottom)+getRed(right)+ getRed(center))/5 newGreen=(getGreen(top)+ getGreen(left)+getGreen(bottom)+getGreen(right)+getGreen(center))/5 newBlue=(getBlue(top)+ getBlue(left)+ getBlue(bottom)+getBlue(right)+ getBlue(center))/5 setColor(center, makeColor(newRed, newGreen, newBlue)) return target We make two copies of the picture. We read pixel colors from one, and set

them in the other. Edge Detection Blurring is averaging across pixels. Edge detection is looking for differences between pixels. We draw lines that our eyes seewhere the luminance changes. If the pixel changes left-to-right, up and down,

then we make our pixel black. Else white. Edge Detection def lineDetect(filename): orig = makePicture(filename) makeBw = makePicture(filename) for x in range(0,getWidth(orig)-1): for y in range(0,getHeight(orig)-1): here=getPixel(makeBw,x,y) down=getPixel(orig,x,y+1) right=getPixel(orig,x+1,y) hereL=(getRed(here)+getGreen(here)+getBlue(here))/3 downL=(getRed(down)+getGreen(down)+getBlue(down))/3 rightL=(getRed(right)+getGreen(right)+getBlue(right))/3 if abs(hereL-downL)>10 and abs(hereL-rightL)>10:

setColor(here,black) if abs(hereL-downL)<=10 and abs(hereL-rightL)<=10: setColor(here,white) return makeBw Notice the use of absolute value (abs) here. We dont care which is larger. We care about a large difference. Blending pictures How do we get part of one picture and part of

another to blur together, so that we see some of each? Its about making one a bit transparent. Video cards sometimes support this transparency in hardware, called an alpha level to each pixel. We do it as a weighted sum If its 50-50, we take 50% of red of picture1s pixels + 50% of red of picture2s pixels, and so on for green and blue, across all overlapping pixels.

Example blended picture Blended here Blending code (1 of 3) def blendPictures(): barb = makePicture(getMediaPath("barbara.jpg")) katie = makePicture(getMediaPath("Katie-smaller.jpg")) canvas = makePicture(getMediaPath("640x480.jpg")) #Copy first 150 columns of Barb sourceX=0 for targetX in range(0,150): sourceY=0 for targetY in range(0,getHeight(barb)): color = getColor(getPixel(barb,sourceX,sourceY)) setColor(getPixel(canvas,targetX,targetY),color)

sourceY = sourceY + 1 sourceX = sourceX + 1 Straightforward copy of 150 columns of Barbs picture Blending code (2 of 3) #Now, grab the rest of Barb and part of Katie # at 50% Barb and 50% Katie overlap = getWidth(barb)-150 sourceX=0 for targetX in range(150,getWidth(barb)): sourceY=0 for targetY in range(0,getHeight(katie)): bPixel = getPixel(barb,sourceX+150,sourceY)

kPixel = getPixel(katie,sourceX,sourceY) newRed= 0.50*getRed(bPixel)+0.50*getRed(kPixel) newGreen=0.50*getGreen(bPixel)+0.50*getGreen(kPixel) newBlue = 0.50*getBlue(bPixel)+0.50*getBlue(kPixel) color = makeColor(newRed,newGreen,newBlue) setColor(getPixel(canvas,targetX,targetY),color) sourceY = sourceY + 1 sourceX = sourceX + 1 Heres the trick. For each pixel, grab 50% of each red, green and blue

Blending code (3 of 3) # Last columns of Katie sourceX=overlap for targetX in range(150+overlap,150+getWidth(katie)): sourceY=0 for targetY in range(0,getHeight(katie)): color = getColor(getPixel(katie,sourceX,sourceY)) setColor(getPixel(canvas,targetX,targetY),color) sourceY = sourceY + 1 sourceX = sourceX + 1 show(canvas) return canvas Background subtraction

Lets say that you have a picture of someone, and a picture of the same place (same background) without the someone there, could you subtract out the background and leave the picture of the person? Maybe even change the background? Lets take that as our problem! Person (Katie) and Background Where do we start?

What we most need to do is to figure out whether the pixel in the Person shot is the same as the in the Background shot. Will they be the EXACT same color? Probably not. So, well need some way of figuring out if two colors are close Remember this? def turnRed(): brown = makeColor(57,16,8) file = r"C:\Documents and Settings\Mark Guzdial\My Documents\mediasources\barbara.jpg" picture=makePicture(file) for px in getPixels(picture):

color = getColor(px) if distance(color,brown)<50.0: redness=getRed(px)*1.5 setRed(px,redness) show(picture) return(picture) Original: Using distance So we know that we want to ask: if distance(personColor,bgColor) > someValue And what do we then?

We want to grab the color from another background (a new background) at the same point. Do we have any examples of doing that? Copying Barb to a canvas def copyBarb(): # Set up the source and target pictures barbf=getMediaPath("barbara.jpg") barb = makePicture(barbf) canvasf = getMediaPath("7inX95in.jpg") canvas = makePicture(canvasf) # Now, do the actual copying targetX = 1 for sourceX in range(1,getWidth(barb)):

targetY = 1 for sourceY in range(1,getHeight(barb)): color = getColor(getPixel(barb,sourceX,sourceY)) setColor(getPixel(canvas,targetX,targetY), color) targetY = targetY + 1 targetX = targetX + 1 show(barb) show(canvas) return canvas Where we are so far: if distance(personColor,bgColor) > someValue: bgcolor = getColor(getPixel(newBg,x,y)) setColor(getPixel(person,x,y), bgcolor) What else do we need?

We need to get all these variables set up We need to input a person picture, a background (background without person), and a new background. We need a loop where x and y are the right values We have to figure out personColor and bgColor Swap a background using background subtraction def swapbg(person, bg, newbg): for x in range(1,getWidth(person)):

for y in range(1,getHeight(person)): personPixel = getPixel(person,x,y) bgpx = getPixel(bg,x,y) personColor= getColor(personPixel) bgColor = getColor(bgpx) if distance(personColor,bgColor) > someValue: bgcolor = getColor(getPixel(newbg,x,y)) setColor(getPixel(person,x,y), bgcolor) Simplifying a little, and specifying a little def swapbg(person, bg, newbg): for x in range(1,getWidth(person)): for y in range(1,getHeight(person)): personPixel = getPixel(person,x,y) bgpx = getPixel(bg,x,y)

personColor= getColor(personPixel) bgColor = getColor(bgpx) if distance(personColor,bgColor) > 10: bgcolor = getColor(getPixel(newbg,x,y)) setColor(personPixel, bgcolor) Specifying a threshold. Using a variable for the person pixel Trying it with a jungle background What happened?

It looks like we reversed the swap If the distance is great, we want to KEEP the pixel. If the distance is small (its basically the same thing), we want to get the NEW pixel. Reversing the swap def swapbg(person, bg, newbg): for x in range(1,getWidth(person)): for y in range(1,getHeight(person)): personPixel = getPixel(person,x,y) bgpx = getPixel(bg,x,y) personColor= getColor(personPixel) bgColor = getColor(bgpx)

if distance(personColor,bgColor) < 10: bgcolor = getColor(getPixel(newbg,x,y)) setColor(personPixel, bgcolor) Better! But why isnt it alot better? Weve got places where we got pixels swapped that we didnt want to swap

See Katies shirt stripes Weve got places where we want pixels swapped, but didnt get them swapped See where Katie made a shadow How could we make it better? What could we change in the program?

We could change the threshold someValue If we increase it, we get fewer pixels matching If we decrease it, we get more pixels matching That wont help with the shadow That wont help with the stripe What could we change in the pictures?

Take them in better light, less shadow Make sure that the person isnt wearing clothes near the background colors. Another way: Chromakey Have a background of a known color Some color that wont be on the person you want to mask out Pure green or pure blue is most often used I used my sons blue bedsheet

This is how the weather people seem to be in front of a map theyre actually in front of a blue sheet. Chromakey recipe def chromakey(source,bg): # source should have something in front of blue, bg is the new background for x in range(1,getWidth(source)): for y in range(1,getHeight(source)): p = getPixel(source,x,y) # My definition of blue: If the redness + greenness < blueness

if (getRed(p) + getGreen(p) < getBlue(p)): #Then, grab the color at the same spot from the new background setColor(p,getColor(getPixel(bg,x,y))) Can also do this with getPixels() def chromakey2(source,bg): # source should have something in front of blue, bg is the new background for p in getPixels(source): # My definition of blue: If the redness + greenness < blueness if (getRed(p) + getGreen(p) < getBlue(p)): #Then, grab the color at the same spot from the new background setColor(p,getColor(getPixel(bg,getX(p),getY(p)))) Example results Just trying the obvious thing for Red

def chromakey2(source,bg): # source should have something in front of red, bg is the new background for p in getPixels(source): if getRed(p) > (getGreen(p) + getBlue(p)): #Then, grab the color at the same spot from the new background setColor(p,getColor(getPixel(bg,getX(p),getY(p)))) Doesnt always work as you expect Lets try that with green def chromakeyGreen(source,bg): # source should have something in front of green, bg is the new background for x in range(1,getWidth(source)): for y in range(1,getHeight(source)): p = getPixel(source,x,y)

# My definition of green: If the greenness > redness + blueness if getGreen(p) > getBlue(p) + getRed(p): #Then, grab the color at the same spot from the new background setColor(p,getColor(getPixel(bg,x,y))) The same definition of green doesnt work What happened? The towel isnt just green The green of the towel has lots of blue and red in it.

Use MediaTools to figure out a new rule that makes sense. Tweaking Chromakey def chromakeyGreen(source,bg): # source should have something in front of green, bg is the new background for x in range(1,getWidth(source)): for y in range(1,getHeight(source)): p = getPixel(source,x,y) # My definition of green: If the greenness > redness AND blueness if getGreen(p) > getBlue(p) and getGreen(p) > getRed(p): #Then, grab the color at the same spot from the new background setColor(p,getColor(getPixel(bg,x,y))) That looks better

Drawing on images Sometimes you want to draw on pictures, to add something to the pictures. Lines Text Circles and boxes. We can do that pixel by pixel, setting black and white pixels

def lineExample(): img = makePicture(pickAFile()) verticalLines(img) horizontalLines(img) show(img) return img Drawing lines on Carolina def horizontalLines(src): for x in range(0,getHeight(src),5): for y in range(0,getWidth(src)): setColor(getPixel(src,y,x),black) def verticalLines(src): for x in range(0,getWidth(src),5):

for y in range(0,getHeight(src)): setColor(getPixel(src,x,y),black) We can use the color name black its pre-defined for us. Yes, some colors are already defined Colors defined for you already: black, white, blue, red, green, gray, lightGray, darkGray, yellow, orange, pink, magenta, and cyan Thats tedious

Thats slow and tedious to set every pixel you want to make lines and text, etc. What you really want to do is to think in terms of your desired effect (think about requirements and design) New functions addText(pict,x,y,string) puts the string starting at position (x,y) in the picture addLine(picture,x1,y1,x2,y2) draws a line from position

(x1,y1) to (x2,y2) addRect(pict,x1,y1,w,h) draws a black rectangle (unfilled) with the upper left hand corner of (x1,y1) and a width of w and height of h addRectFilled(pict,x1,y1,w,h,color) draws a rectangle filled with the color of your choice with the upper left hand corner of (x1,y1) and a width of w and height of h The mysterious red box on the beach def addABox(): beach = makePicture(getMediaPath("beach-smaller.jpg")) addRectFilled(beach,150,150,50,50,red) show(beach) return beach Example picture

def littlepicture(): canvas=makePicture(getMediaPath("640x480.jpg")) addText(canvas,10,50,"This is not a picture") addLine(canvas,10,20,300,50) addRectFilled(canvas,0,200,300,500,yellow) addRect(canvas,10,210,290,490) return canvas A thought experiment Look at that previous page: Which is a fewer number of bytes?

The program that drew the picture The pixels in the picture itself. Its a no-brainer The program is less than 100 characters (100 bytes) The picture is stored on disk at about 15,000 bytes Vector-based vs. Bitmap Graphical representations Vector-based graphical representations are basically executable programs that generate the

picture on demand. Postscript, Flash, and AutoCAD use vector-based representations Bitmap graphical representations (like JPEG, BMP, GIF) store individual pixels or representations of those pixels. JPEG and GIF are actually compressed representations Vector-based representations can be smaller

Vector-based representations can be much smaller than bit-mapped representations Smaller means faster transmission (Flash and Postscript) If you want all the detail of a complex picture, no, its not. But vector-based has more value than that Imagine that youre editing a picture with lines on it.

If you edit a bitmap image and extend a line, its just more bits. If you edit a vector-based image, its possible to just change the specification Theres no way to really realize that youve extended or shrunk the line. Change the numbers saying where the line is

Then it really is the same line Thats important when the picture drives the creation of the product, like in automatic cutting machines How are images compressed? Sometimes lossless using techniques like run length encoding (RLE) Instead of this: BBYYYYYYYYYBB

We could say 9 Ys like this: BB9YBB Lossy compression (like JPEG and GIF) loses detail, some of which is invisible to the eye. When changing the picture means changing a program In a vector-based drawing package, changing the drawing is changing a program.

How could we reach in and change the actual program? We can using string manipulation The program is just a string of characters We want to manipulate those characters, in order to manipulate the program Coming soon Example programmed graphic

If I did this right, we perceive the left half as lighter than the right half In reality, the end quarters are actually the same colors. Building a programmed graphic def greyEffect(): file = getMediaPath("640x480.jpg") pic = makePicture(file) # First, 100 columns of 100-grey grey = makeColor(100,100,100) for x in range(1,100): for y in range(1,100):

setColor(getPixel(pic,x,y),grey) # Second, 100 columns of increasing greyness greyLevel = 100 for x in range(100,200): grey = makeColor(greyLevel, greyLevel, greyLevel) for y in range(1,100): setColor(getPixel(pic,x,y),grey) greyLevel = greyLevel + 1 # Third, 100 colums of increasing greyness, from 0 greyLevel = 0 for x in range(200,300): grey = makeColor(greyLevel, greyLevel, greyLevel) for y in range(1,100):

setColor(getPixel(pic,x,y),grey) greyLevel = greyLevel + 1 # Finally, 100 columns of 100-grey grey = makeColor(100,100,100) for x in range(300,400): for y in range(1,100): setColor(getPixel(pic,x,y),grey) return pic Another Programmed Graphic def coolpic(): canvas=makePicture(getMediaPath("640x480.jpg")) for index in range(25,1,-1): color = makeColor(index*10,index*5,index) addRectFilled(canvas,0,0,index*10,index*10,color) show(canvas) return canvas

And another def coolpic2(): canvas=makePicture(getMediaPath("640x480.jpg")) for index in range(25,1,-1): addRect(canvas,index,index,index*3,index*4) addRect(canvas,100+index*4,100+index*3,index*8,index*10) show(canvas) return canvas Why do we write programs? Could we do this in Photoshop? Maybe

Could I teach you to do this in Photoshop? Maybe Im sure that you can, but you need to know how. Might take a lot of demonstration But this program is an exact definition of the process of generating this picture It works for anyone who can run the program, without knowing Photoshop We write programs to encapsulate and

communicate process If you can do it by hand, do it. If you need to teach someone else to do it, consider a program. If you need to explain to lots of people how to do it, definitely use a program. If you want lots of people to do it without having to teach them something first, definitely use a program.

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