In partnership with Background Legislated by Act 166

In partnership with Background  Legislated by Act 166

In partnership with Background Legislated by Act 166 Federal push: part of ESEA flexibility waiver Fully functional performance-based evaluation system in place for 2014-15 50% on process/practice and 50% on product Equivalency option for process/practice CESA 6/Dr. James Stronge 6 Performance Standards Educator Evaluation

Process Teachers Product InTASC standards; Danielsons 4 domains and 22 components Statewide assessments Districtwide assessments

Principals ISLLC standards Potential Data Sources: 50% 50% Student Learning Objectives (SLOs) -------------------------------- Graduation data

CESA 6 Model Other 6 performance standards for teachers, ed specialists, and principals Aligned to Danielson & national standards DPI Framework

Models of Practice Student Outcomes The Research Research on effective vs. ineffective teachers and leaders clearly indicates there is a great cost to student learning as a result of having ineffective teachers and leaders in our school. What factor has the largest effect on student achievement? Mixed Ability Grouping? Class Size?

Prior Achievement? The Teacher? What factor had the largest effect on student achievement? Mixed Ability Grouping? 4 Class Size? 3 Prior Achievement?

2 The Teacher? 1 Dallas Research: Teacher Quality 4th Grade Math Achievement Dallas, Texas data: 2800-3200 students per cohort Comparison of 3 highly effective & 3 ineffective teachers (Jordan, Mendro, & Weerasinghe, 1997) Dallas Research: Teacher Quality 4th Grade Reading Achievement

Dallas, Texas data: 2800-3200 students per cohort Comparison of 3 highly effective & 3 ineffective teachers (Jordan, Mendro, & Weerasinghe, 1997) Sequence of Effective Teachers Low Low Low High High

High 52-54 percentile points difference over 3 years Sanders & Rivers (1996) Sequence of Effective Teachers Low Low

High High High High 13 percentile points difference Sanders & Rivers (1996)

Residual Effect Two years of effective teachers could not remediate the achievement loss caused by one year with a poor teacher. Mendro, Jordan, Gomez, Anderson, & Bembry (1998) Time in the School Year Needed to Achieve the Same Amount of Learning 75th Percentile Teacher

25th Percentile Teacher 0 1/4 1/2 3/4 1 Years Needed

Leigh, Economics of Education Review (2010) Time in the School Year Needed to Achieve the Same Amount of Learning 90th Percentile Teacher 10th Percentile Teacher 0 1/4

1/2 3/4 1 Years Needed Leigh, Economics of Education Review (2010) Percentile Gain Annual Student Achievement Gains 35

30 25 20 15 10 5 0 Class Size Reduction: Quality Class Size Reduction:24:1 TeacherTeacher

Quality Improvement: to to 15:1 Improvement: vs. 25 %tile 24:1 15:1 25th vs. 75th75 percentile Barber, M., & Mourshed, M. (2007). How the worlds best-performing school systems come out on top. London: McKinsey & Company; Stronge, J.H., Ward, T.J., Tucker, P.D., & Grant, L.W.; Retrieved from: http://www.mckinsey.com/locations/ukireland/publications/pdf/ Education_report.pdf

Spillover Effect Student achievement rises across a grade when a highquality teacher comes on board: one-tenth to one-fifth the impact of replacing the students own teacher! Jackon & Bruegmann, American Economic Journal: Applied Economics (2009) Effectiveness Project Effectiveness is the goal. Evaluation is merely the means. Who Will Be Involved?

Teachers Educational Specialists School Administrators (principals) Effectiveness Project What is the basis of the evaluation? How will performance be documented? How will performance be rated? Question 1 What is the basis of the evaluation? Performance Standards

Teacher Professional Knowledge Instructional Planning Instructional Delivery Assessment for/of Learning Learning Environment Professionalism Educational Specialist Professional Knowledge Communication & Collaboration Assessment Program Planning &

Management Program Delivery Professionalism Question 2 How will performance be documented? Multiple Data Sources at-a-glance Observations Documentation Log Student Surveys Self-Assessment of Professional

Practice Student Learning Objectives Everything is housed in an electronic database: OASYS Data Management My Learning Plan OASYS Data Collection Responsibilities Data Collection Procedure Observation (formal/informal) Evaluator

Teacher/Ed Specialist X Documentation Log X Student Surveys X Self Assessment of

Professional Practice X Student Learning Objectives X Observations May take a variety of forms Formal observation Informal observation Walk-through observation

Announced or unannounced May occur in a variety of settings Classroom environment Non-classroom settings Formal Observations Directly focused on teacher performance standards Announced or unannounced at least 20 minutes in duration Teachers observed at least twice per year Additional observations at evaluators discretion At least one pre-observation conference for teachers

during their first year in district Evaluator feedback during post-observation conference Observation forms kept in OASYS database Documentation Log Evidence of performance related to specific standards Educators voice in the process Complements classroom observation Includes both specific required artifacts and teacherselected artifacts Emphasis is on quality, not quantity Collected throughout the year Reviewed by evaluator by mid-year for probationary teachers; by early May for all teachers Artifacts uploaded into OASYS database

Teacher Artifact Examples Professionalism Transcript PD certificate Instructional Planning Differentiation in lesson plan Instructional Delivery Video/audio of instructional unit Sample work * Required artifact

Assessment Sample of baseline and periodic assessments* Learning Environment Student survey information* Schedule of daily routine Professionalism PD log* Parent communication log*

Student Surveys Provide students perceptions of how teacher is performing -- direct knowledge of classroom practices All teachers survey students twice per year Age considerations for survey Surveys are anonymous Actual responses seen only by individual teacher Teachers fill out Student Survey Growth Plan and Student Survey Analysis and include in documentation log Self-Assessment of Professional Practice Reflect on effectiveness and adequacy of practice

Based on each performance standard Consider performance indicators for examples of behaviors exemplifying each standard One area of strength per standard One area of growth, along with strategies for growth, per standard Student Learning Objectives Detailed, measureable goals for student academic growth Set at the beginning of the year Based on SMART goal format Individual teacher or group goals Classroom or subsets of students Approved by principal/supervisor

Mid-year check point End-of-year evaluation how did we do? Question 3 How will teacher performance be rated? Evaluations Interim Evaluation All probationary teachers/educational specialists Used to document evidence of meeting standards Does NOT include rating of performance

Summative Evaluation Comes at end of evaluation cycle Four point rating scale Performance rubric for every standard Rating based on preponderance of evidence Summative evaluation form in OASYS

Terms used in Rating Scale Category Description Definition Distinguished The teacher maintains performance, accomplishments, and behaviors that consistently surpass the established standard.

Sustains high performance over period of time Behaviors have strong positive impact on learners and school climate May serve as role model to others Effective The teacher meets the standard in a manner that is consistent with the schools mission and goals. Meets the requirements contained in job description as expressed in evaluation criteria Behaviors have positive impact on learners and school climate

Willing to learn and apply new skills Developing/ Needs Improvement The teacher is inconsistent in meeting standards and/or in working toward the schools missions and goals. Requires support in meeting the standards Results in less than quality work performance Leads to areas for teacher improvement being jointly identified and planned between teacher

and evaluator Unacceptable The teacher consistently performs below the established standards or in a manner that is inconsistent with the schools missions and goals. Does not meet requirements contained in job description as expressed in evaluation criteria Results in minimal student learning May contribute to recommendation for teacher not being considered for continued employment

Questions on the process? Look Fors & Red Flags Look Fors What do we WANT to see in each standard? Exemplary behaviors Red Flags What should we NOT see? What is cause for

alarm or concern? ACTIVITY Groups of 6 one group per standard Identify a recorder 2 minutes at each standard Document look fors AND red flags Rotate to the next standard Last reporter at each standard will report out to the large group Additional Questions? Thank you!

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