Simile and Metaphor - Polk County School District

Simile and Metaphor - Polk County School District

Figurative Language vs. Literal Language What does it mean? Standard ELACC8RL4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,

including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. Literal Language Literal language is language that means

exactly what it says. For example, if I said, Sit down, I literally mean take a seat in your chair Figurative Language Figurative language is language that does not mean exactly what it says.

It is understood that the words mean something different. Ex. I am burning up! Figurative and Literal Literal: Would you please chill these sodas

in the refrigerator? Figurative: Would you please chill out! Dont mix them up! In basketball, if we say, He is on fire, we mean that he hasnt missed a shot in a while.

But what if. What if we took that literally.Hes on fire! Examples She is a peach! Literal: She is a fuzzy piece of fruit that we can cook in a pie!

Figurative: She is really sweet! Examples Ill do that when pigs fly. Literal: As soon as I look out my window and see a flying pig, I will get right on that. Figurative: Its never going to happen.

Examples You are one smart cookie! Literal: You are a real, live cookie with a very big brain. Figurative: You are an intelligent person.

Remember Figurative is language that you have to figure out. You cant go exactly by what it means. Types of Figurative Language

Simile, Metaphor and Personification Standard ELACC8RL4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific

word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. Simile A simile is a comparison of two people, objects, or ideas that uses the words like or as or than

Example The shop owner is as busy as a bee. Example It was quiet like a library at midnight. (Brenda Woods)

Example She floated gracefully down the halls like a butterfly. Poem Sample Flint by Christina Rossetti

An emerald is as green as grass, A ruby red as blood; A sapphire shines as blue as heaven; A flint lies in the mud. A diamond is a brilliant stone, To catch the world's desire; An opal holds a fiery spark;

But a flint holds a fire. Metaphor A metaphor compares people, things or ideas without using the words like or as. It makes a direct connection.

Example You are what you eat. Example He was a solid rock against his enemies. Example

That test was a nightmare! Metaphor Poem by Lill Pluta My brother is a dragon. My Moms a teddy bear. I am a shaggy sheep dog With a ton of tangled hair.

My father is a monkey He likes to make us laugh, Especially my sister Who is a tall giraffe We are a busy family With many things to do. Our home is always happy,

But sometimes its a zoo. Personification Personification describing something that isnt human by giving it human-like qualities. Example

The stars danced playfully in the moonlit sky. Example Most pianos have pretty good manners but Steven can make them sound rude. Example

The trees dropped their leaves and rested. Example Any trust I had for him walked right out the door. My Dinner is Dancing

My food loves to prance, to jump, to dance; I wait for the time, I wait for the chance! As mommy goes in and out of the room; tables and chairs become their ballroom! I flick my fingers; swing my wrist. Beans and turkey are doing the twist! Peas, plumbs, apples or a mango;

on to the walls, they're doing the tango! Types of Figurative Language 2 Hyperbole and Idiom Standard ELACC8RL4: Determine the meaning of words and

phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts ELACC8L5: Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in

word meanings. a. Interpret figures of speech (e.g. verbal irony, puns) in context. Hyperbole Hyperbole An exaggerated statement used to create an effect. It is used to emphasize a

point. Example: Shes said for you to be quite on several million occasions. Poetry Sample On a Snowy Day Everyone looks like snowmen.

So much snow that its piling up to heaven. The fireplace is aglow like a giants oven. Our cups of hot chocolate are piled To the roof of the house With marshmallows. We scurry in the house, a bunch of hurried mice, On a snow day.

Poetry Sample School Fight You cant hear a pin drop As all the kids gather around; They are vultures Waiting for the corpse

Of the one who loses. The tall kid He swings his fist with his hurricane force. A torrential spray of blood Explodes from the smaller boys nose And covers the tiled floor. The vultures fly away

As the teachers quickly approach. Idiom An idiom is an expression in one language that cannot be matched or directly translated word-for-word in another language. It is commonly known that its meaning is not

literal. Example Its raining cats and dogs outside! Example Dont count your chickens before they hatch.

Example He is head over heels for her! Example You are the cheese to my macaroni.

Poem Sample 'You can't cry over spilled milk! ' my mother always said. 'Life's not a piece of cake! ' she hammered in my head. 'That's the way it goes, ' that's the way the cookie crumbles'

My mother saved her idioms for all my idiotic troubles. --John Randal Poem Sample Cat Got Your Tongue I was feeling shy when my uncle came.

"Has the cat got your tongue?" he said. He must have meant, "Why aren't you talking? Because my tongue was still in my head. Adele Tolley Wilson Ill give you the moon!

The Difference Hyperbole This is general exaggeration for an effect. It is not a specific saying. Ex. I am about to

starve to death. Idiom This is a special expression used for an effect. It would not make sense

literally. Ex. Im so hungry, I could eat a horse. Task Requirement: Create a poem using two of the following: personification, metaphor, idiom,

hyperbole or simile. Form: Authors Choice Topic: Authors Choice

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