SAQ -Short Answer Questions for AP World History

SAQ -Short Answer Questions for AP World History

SAQ Short Answer Questions for AP World History What are the SAQs? SAQs comprise 20% of the Exam score SAQs can be taken from any unit 4 questions total 50 minutes to answer (12.5 minutes per question).

Why SAQ? The SAQs allow students to use knowledge taught in their unique courses to answer broad questions derived from the Key Concepts, which also assess the students use of various historical thinking skills. Students may employ a wide variety of evidence drawn from the particular content of their AP World History course and materials. (College Board) Why SAQ? Provides teachers more flexibility to teach their own content, and for the use of different textbooks across the country. Increased

emphasis on development of historical thinking skills. Puts WHAP in line with AP US History and AP European History What is an SAQ? The short answer question requires students to accurately answer a question briefly, specifically, and accurately. Generally speaking students are able to answer questions with fewer sentences Scoring

Complete sentences. Correct or incorrect. 1 point for each part = 0-3 points Tips Does All require complete sentences 3 parts of the question must be answered. Usually broken into 3 parts a, b, and c, but sometimes part a or part b will have 2 questions withinit always asks 3 questionsso read carefully.

Limited space (a one page box with 23 lines) in which to write their answers. Anything written outside of the box will not be scored. Tips Read question carefully. Annotate the question and rephrase the question as your topic sentence (remember no thesis sentence necessary). Complete Do Sentences NOT bullet (bullets=zero points).

Tips Does not require a thesis statement Students give enough information to answer the question, but not write an essay. At least 2 of the 4 questions will include a stimulus of some kind: photo, political resources, chart, graph, or one or more documents (primary or secondary) Tips Directly answer the question. Use the language of the prompt! (always)

Pay close attention to what the question is asking of you: look for key action words such as describe, analyze, identify, explain, etc. Answer everything the question asks of you: you may have to do more than one thing such as identify and explain. Tips Look for pluralsasking you do more than one thing: reason vs. reasons; cause vs. causes. If its plural you must do 2! You may not see many of these in SAQs, but be on the lookout.

Use active verbs! Dont write outside the spaceyou should have enough spacedont panic! Tips Experts differ on whether you should label your answers. I recommend you label a), b), and c) for ease of understanding. Readers will read the question in such a way as to give you credit where credit is due, and not to nitpick where you provide your answer (although it must be IN THE BOX). ACE the Question

A-Answer the question (this is the assertion or claim). CCite specific factual evidence EExplain how the evidence proves the assertion SAQ World History The Egyptian and Mesopotamian civilizations in the first wave civilizations originated at roughly similar periods in world history, but they evolved in distinctly unique ways for difference. A. Identify and explain a reason for ONE difference in the Egyptian and Mesopotamian political systems. B. Identify and explain a reason for ONE similarity in the Egyptian and Mesopotamian political systems. C. Identify and explain a reason for ONE difference or similarity in Egyptian and Mesopotamian culture. Scoring Guide: 0-3 points

One point for identifying and explaining how and why Egyptian and Mesopotamian civilizations were different politically in the period of the first wave civilizations. One point for identifying and explaining how and why Egyptian and Mesopotamian civilizations were similar politically in the period of the first wave civilizations. One point for identifying and explaining how and why Egyptian and Mesopotamian cultures were different or similar in the period of the first wave civilizations. SAQ about Classical ChinaEra 2.2 Short Answer Question- (SAQ)

Historical Thinking Skill- Change and Continuity Over Time The Han is one of Chinas great historical dynasties. Like the Qin, the Han emperors ruled over an enormous and unified territory, but very different from the Qin, they were able to sustain their rule despite a brief interruption for over four centuries the Han stands as the longest era of Chinese history in which a single hereditary line of rulers controlled the government. -Professor Robert Eno, University of Indiana A) Identify and explain ONE way in which the rule of state

government of the Han Dynasty was a continuity of the Qin Dynasty. B) Identify and explain TWO ways in which the rule of state government of the Han Dynasty changed from the Qin Dynasty. SAQ Recent discoveries suggest that the adoption of agriculture, supposedly our most decisive step toward a better life, was in many ways a catastrophe from which we have never recovered. With agriculture came the gross social and sexual inequality, the disease and despotism, that curse our existence. At first, the evidence against this revisionist interpretation will strike twentieth century Americans as irrefutable. Were better off in almost every respect than people in the Middle Ages, who in turn had it easier than cavemen, who in turn were better off than apes. Just count our advantages. We enjoy the most abundant and varied foods, the best tools and material goods, some of the longest and

healthiest lives, in history. Most of us are safe from starvation and predators. We get our energy from oil and machines, not from out sweat. There are at least three sets of reasons to explain the findings that agriculture was bad for health. First, hunter-gatherers enjoyed a varied diet, while early farmers obtained most of their food from one or a few starchy crops. The farmers gained cheap calories at the cost of poor nutrition. Second, because of dependences on a limited number of crops, farmers ran the risk of starvation if one crop failed. Finally, the mere fact that agriculture encouraged people to clump together in crowded societies, many of which then carried on trade with other crowded societies, led to the spread of parasites and infectious disease. Epidemics couldnt take hold when populations were scattered in small bands that constantly shifted camp. Jared Diamond, Discover Magazine, 1999

Identify and explain ONE specific historical example that supports Diamonds argument about the importance of the Agricultural Revolution. Identify and explain ONE specific historical example that challenges Diamonds argument about the importance of the Agricultural Revolution. Identify and explain ONE way in which scholarly disciplines outside of history have contributed to the scholarly perspectives described by Diamond. Directions

Read the source and complete the following items. Double Underline Diamonds Thesis or Argument Single Underline the pieces of evidence that Diamond used to support his argument Part (a): Identify and explain ONE specific historical example that supports Diamonds argument about the importance of the Agricultural Revolution. How to Earn the Point for Part (a): Write down any specific historical examples that you can think of that would support Diamonds argument:

Early River Valley Civilizations, such as ancient Egypt, became highly stratified with food producers and manual laborers often placed in the bottom of the social hierarchy. Dependence on a small number of crops can reduce the diversity of ones diet. Smaller physical size in early farming societies, such as Mesopotamia and Egypt bears witness to this development. The devastation caused by the Black Death was due in part to increased trade and interaction of peoples, as well as greater population density in cities brought about by the development of agriculture. The Agricultural Revolution led to dependency on one or a small number of dominant crops. This could be disastrous in times of famine, such as during the Irish Potato Famine. Ways points can be missed for part (a):

Fails to recognize that Diamond is arguing that agriculture had negative health and social effects. (Misinterprets the argument) Addresses one of the negative effects of the Agricultural Revolution, but fails to connect it to a specific historical example. Response is vague or over generalized. Sample Student Response (A) Jared Diamond claims that the Agricultural revolution was a negative impact on human development. He states that it

caused society to become unfair and clumped together, which allowed the spread of disease. This is supported by the Bubonic plague, which killed nearly a third of Europes population. This would not have happened if humans were still hunter gatherers and spread out. Should this response earn the point for part (a)? Should this response earn the point for part (a)? Jared Diamond claims that the Agricultural revolution was a negative impact on human development. He states that it caused society to become unfair and clumped together, which allowed the spread of disease. This is supported by the Bubonic plague, which killed nearly a third of Europes population. This would not have happened if humans were still hunter gatherers and spread out. Should Explain

this response earn the point for part (a)? YES your choice: Correctly interprets Diamonds argument Provides a specific historical example that supports Diamonds argument Part (b): Identify and explain ONE specific historical example that challenges Diamonds argument about the importance of the Agricultural Revolution Write down any specific historical examples that challenge Diamonds

argument: The increased production of food through agriculture allowed for the specialization of labor in early River Valley Civilizations, which led to greater intellectual and technological advancements, such as written language and metallurgy. The Agricultural Revolution allowed for the stabilization of the food supply, such as the development of vast granaries and store houses in ancient Rome that were able to feed its citizens in troubled times. The Agricultural Revolution allowed for the building of permanent settlements that gave rise to civilizations and large states, such as the city-states of Mesopotamia or the urban centers of Harappa and Mohenjo Daro in the Indus Valley. Ways points can be missed for part (b):

Fails to challenge Diamonds argument that agriculture had negative health and social effects. (Misinterprets the argument) Addresses one of the positive effects of the Agricultural Revolution but fails to connect it to a specific historical example. Response is vague or too general. Sample student response for part (B):

However, it is the surplus of food that allows for specialization. Varying jobs create culture, arguably the best part about civilization. Religion, art, science, math, language all of these stem from not having to gather food all day long. Explain your choice: Correctly interprets Diamonds argument, but does not connect these developments to a specific historical example. Part (c): Identify and explain ONE way in which scholarly disciplines outside of history have contributed to the scholarly perspectives described . Archeology has led to recovery of human remains that by Diamond

demonstrate greater tooth decay, lower bone density, and the smaller size of early farmers as opposed to hunter-gatherers. Anthropological studies of modern hunter-gatherer societies have revealed greater gender equality among many of these groups than is believed to have been found among agricultural and settled people throughout history. Medical studies related to the spread of disease demonstrate that epidemics are more likely to spread in the presence of larger groups of people in frequent contact with one another. What is Social Science? * Definition of Social Science: a major category of academic disciplines, concerned with society and the

relationships among individuals within a society. It in turn has many branches, each of which is considered a "social science". The main social sciences include economics, political science, human geography, demography and sociology. In a wider sense, social science also includes some fields in the humanities such as anthropology, archaeology, psychology, history, and linguistics. Ways points can be missed for part (C): Fails to state the discipline or field of inquiry that complimented the historical argument. Addresses field of inquiry, but does not adequately or clearly address how the discipline would contribute to the argument. Sample student response for part (C) One way that scholarly disciplines outside of history contributed

to Diamonds perspective is through the study of equality. Those people who have developed a knowledge of and recognition of the causes of inequality would have contributed. Should this response earn the point for part ? No, Does not identify a specific scholarly discipline that would corroborates Diamonds argument Student Sample #1: Practice Scoring Student Response A specific example to support the argument being made is the use of a caste system in India. This caste system provided gross social and sexual inequalities that made peoples lives unbearable, specifically the untouchables. The

untouchables were regarded as next to dirt. Score A historical example to challenge the claim of agriculture having negative effects is the rapid growth of the population due to agriculture. Agriculture provided an abundance of food that supported the population. Score Archeologists (?) have contributed to the perspective of Diamond because new things would be discovered that could completely change the point of view of some people. Score Scoring Guidelines a) a)

a) Identify and explain ONE specific historical example that supports Diamonds argument about the importance of the Agricultural Revolution. 0 Identify and explain ONE specific historical example that challenges Diamonds argument about the importance of the Agricultural Revolution. 1 0 Identify and explain ONE way in which scholarly disciplines outside of history have contributed to the scholarly perspectives described by Diamond. 1

0 1 Student Sample #1 Score Results: a) Identify and explain ONE specific historical example that supports Diamonds argument about the importance of the Agricultural Revolution. 0 Fails to earn 1 point for part a. Explanation: It fails to earn 1 point for part a. The response attempts to describe the use of the caste system in India as an example of social inequality, but fails to explain how the caste system might

have been a result of the Agricultural Revolution. In order to earn a point for part a, it might have suggested that the transition toward farming and pastoralism contributed to patterns to inequality and social stratification, which formed the basis for the caste system in India. Student Sample #1 Score Results: b) Identify and explain ONE specific historical example that challenges Diamonds argument about the importance of the Agricultural Revolution. 0 Fails to earn 1 point for part b. Explanation: It does not earn 1 point for part b. The response attempts to explain agricultures role in providing an abundance of food, which

supported population growth. However, this explanation does not address a specific historical example to provide evidence for this claim. Suggesting that the creation of a food surplus in the Fertile Crescent or Nile River Valley supported larger families, population growth, and eventual urbanization would have been an effective way to earn this point. Student Sample #1 Score Results: c) Identify and explain ONE way in which scholarly disciplines outside of history have contributed to the scholarly perspectives described by Diamond. 0 Fails to earn 1 point for part c. Explanation: The response fails to earn 1 point for

part c. It mentions that archeology may have contributed to Diamonds perspective, but the way in which this field of study might have done so is neither specific nor sufficiently explained. Explaining that archeology might have revealed the increasing social inequalities or dietary deficiencies brought about in the transition towards agriculture would have allowed the response to earn this point. NAME ________________________ DATE ___________ PERIOD __________ SCORE ______ SAQ SCORING RUBRIC Topic: ___________________________ QUESTION A

Full Credit Earned Common Issues (In Stimulus Based Prompt - May snag a word but NOT Quote). Doesnt use Key Words from Question/Prompt

Relies on Quote from prompt Wrong time period Wrong location Cites Evidence: defines or describes the claim

(support answer with SFI [Specific Factual Information] from OUTSIDE the Prompt learned from class readings, discussions, activities) Missing evidence/reason/event/example Random evidence (littering) not connected to Answer Not specific

Off topic Expands/Explains Evidence (connect the dots! How does the evidence support/prove answer/assertions?) Vague (attempts but doesnt elaborate) No connection between evidence & answer

No interpretation Doesnt draw conclusion Points Earned Answers Question: direct response makes a claim that can be proved. Doesnt answer question (incorrect)

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