RTI Title Slide Layout

RTI Title Slide Layout

Response to Intervention in Middle Schools: Considerations for Implementation National Center on Response to Intervention National Center on Response to Intervention Session Agenda What is Response to Intervention (RTI)? Overview of middle school information-gathering activities Essential components in middle schools

RTI implementation considerations National Center on Response to Intervention 2 Participant Outcomes By the end of the training, participants should be able to: Articulate the four essential components of RTI. Understand RTI essential components in middle schools. Understand RTI implementation of key components.

Understand the implementation plan worksheets to begin developing their own plans. National Center on Response to Intervention 3 What Is RTI? National Center on Response to Intervention 4

Think-Pair-Share What do you think about when you hear RTI? National Center on Response to Intervention 5 What Do We Mean by RTI? Response to Intervention integrates assessment and intervention within a multi-level prevention system to maximize student achievement and to reduce behavioral problems. With RTI, schools identify students at risk for poor learning outcomes, monitor student progress, provide

evidence-based interventions and adjust the intensity and nature of those interventions depending on a students responsiveness, and identify students with learning disabilities or other disabilities. National Center on Response to Intervention 6 Essential RTI Components Screening Schoolwide, multi-level instructional prevention system: Primary (Level I)

Secondary (Level II) Tertiary (Level III) Progress monitoring Data-based decision making for: Instructional decision making Movement within the multi-level system Disability identification (in accordance with state law) Evaluating the effectiveness of the intervention

National Center on Response to Intervention 7 Essential Components of RTI National Center on Response to Intervention 8 Middle School Information-Gathering Activities

National Center on Response to Intervention 9 Research Participants NCRTI staff spoke with middle school representatives from the following states: Alaska Arizona California Colorado Connecticut

Florida Georgia Idaho Illinois Iowa Maine Maryland Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana New York North Dakota

National Center on Response to Intervention Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Carolina Texas Utah Virginia Washington Wisconsin Wyoming

10 Information-Gathering Activities NCRTI staff did the following: Initially called and asked schools to participate. Conducted two-hour phone interviews with participants. Asked about RTI practices for screening, progress monitoring, databased decision making, and multi-level instructional practices. Conducted follow-up two-hour phone calls with schools that implemented all essential components. Conducted site visits with schools. National Center on Response to Intervention

11 School Demographics Most schools served 6th, 7th, and 8th grades. Schools represented rural, suburban, and urban schools. Many schools had diverse student populations. Individualized education programs (IEPs) ranged from 7% to 20% of the student population. National Center on Response to Intervention

12 RTI Essential Components in Middle Schools National Center on Response to Intervention 13 Essential Components of RTI National Center on Response to Intervention

14 Screening Practices Purpose. Screening data give school staff a broad view of: Class-wide needs Individual student risk status Tools. Key staff members researched and chose tools that matched the method, frequency, and content area that best fit their needs.

Frequency. Nearly 75% of schools (30/42) screened 3 times each year. National Center on Response to Intervention 15 Screening Importance You cant forget about universal screens that scoop up students you may have missed before because they were making it with their understanding at one level, but the bar got raised and now theyre falling behind.

Middle School Principal National Center on Response to Intervention 16 Choosing Screening Tools Participating middle schools considered: Their desired outcomes from an assessment. Determine basic skills gaps. Predict school performance. Existing data collection tools.

Because we are screening, we see problems in real time, so we are identifying kids before there is a major deficit. Middle School Principal National Center on Response to Intervention 17 NCRTI Screening Tools Chart National Center on Response to Intervention

www.rti4success.org 18 Think-Pair-Share Screening Processes Think about how to implement screening in your school. If you already have a screening practice, how are the data and results working for your needs? National Center on

Response to Intervention 19 Screening Handout Take a few minutes to review the handout and think about questions. National Center on Response to Intervention 20 Essential Components of RTI

National Center on Response to Intervention 21 Multi-Level Instruction Middle schools follow the same general instructional framework that has been found in elementary schools: Primary prevention Secondary intervention Tertiary intervention

National Center on Response to Intervention 22 Middle School Practices for Primary Prevention Improving the primary level of prevention (core instruction) This practice is pivotal to RTI implementation success. Engaging students in their learning Every student knows the learning goals.

Using a standardized curriculum Mr. Xs 6th-grade math is the same as Ms. Ys 6th-grade math. National Center on Response to Intervention 23 Primary Prevention Our big bucks go into Tier I [primary prevention]. Middle School Principal

National Center on Response to Intervention 24 Middle School Practices for Secondary Intervention Class size. The student-teacher ratio was ~ 1015:1 Schedule. Interventions often occurred during electives or an already existing flex class period. Delivery. General education teachers most frequently taught the intervention classes, but some schools reported a combination of general educators, special educators, and specialists.

Frequency. Most students received interventions daily. Duration. Most interventions were a class-long session (typical time was 44 minutes). National Center on Response to Intervention 25 Middle School Practices for Tertiary Intervention Class size. The student-teacher ratio was 3-4:1. Schedule. Most tertiary classes occurred in place of core and elective classes in other subject areas.

Tertiary-level interventions often were delivered in addition to the core curriculum. Delivery. Special educators and full-time interventionists were the most common teachers. Many schools had co-teaching (two teachers delivered the interventions) models for the tertiary level. Frequency. Instruction was provided daily. Duration. Usually classes lasted one class period each day.

Many students needing tertiary-level instruction had two intensive classes (e.g., in lieu of both electives). Often, length is dependent upon individual students needs (e.g., problem severity, subject, intervention method). National Center on Response to Intervention 26 Example School Schedule

National Center on Response to Intervention 27 Instructional Intervention Tools Chart National Center on Response to Intervention www.rti4success.org 28

Think-Pair-Share Multi-Level Instruction What techniques do you employ in your primary prevention level to boost instructional outcomes? What specific practices differentiate your secondary and tertiary instructional levels? How will you ensure that intensive-level instruction remains aligned to the core curriculum? National Center on Response to Intervention 29 Essential Components Guiding Questions:

Multi-Level Prevention System Handout Take a few minutes to review the handout and think about questions. National Center on Response to Intervention 30 Essential Components of RTI National Center on Response to Intervention

31 Progress Monitoring Practices in Middle Schools Progress monitoring practices were diverse. The most common tools were assessment programs and curriculum-based measures (CBMs). Most middle schools implemented progress monitoring. For secondary level, progress monitoring often was weekly, but frequency ranged from weekly to monthly. For tertiary level, progress monitoring often was twice a week, but frequency ranged from daily to twice a month. The schools involved students in their progress monitoring.

National Center on Response to Intervention 32 Progress Monitoring Tools Chart National Center on Response to Intervention Think-Pair-Share Progress Monitoring What tools will you use to measure each content area and level of intervention?

With what frequency do you need to collect student data for secondary-level and tertiary-level intervention classes? National Center on Response to Intervention 34 Essential Components Guiding Questions: Progress Monitoring Handout Take a few minutes to review the handout and think about questions.

National Center on Response to Intervention 35 Essential Components of RTI National Center on Response to Intervention 36 Data-Based Decision Making Data analysis at all levels of RTI implementation

(e.g., state, district, school, grade level) Established routines and procedures for making decisions Explicit decision rules for assessing student progress (e.g., state and district benchmarks, level, and/or rate) Weekly RTI data-based decision-making teams to review student data to make data-informed instructional decisions National Center on Response to Intervention 37 Data-Based Decision Making: Middle School Example

Prescreening questionnaire is used for all incoming 6th graders. This questionnaire may even serve as the screener if appropriate data are provided. District-provided cut scores are used to determine which students are in need of interventions. In addition, the results of diagnostic assessments, grades, and other sources of "soft data are used to inform data discussions. School counselors organize all the data (screening, progress monitoring, and soft data). Leadership team meets to discuss all students receiving interventions and those students who have been referred to the team by content-area teachers. National Center on

Response to Intervention 38 Think-Pair-Share Data-Based Decision Making What types of data (screening and progress monitoring) will you use to make data-based instructional decisions? What are your data-based decision-making procedures (decision tree)? National Center on Response to Intervention

39 Essential Components Guiding Questions: Data-Based Decision-Making Handout Take a few minutes to review the handout and think about questions. National Center on Response to Intervention 40 Stages of Implementation

1. Exploring and adopting 2. Planning 3. Implementing 4. Continuously improving National Center on Response to Intervention 41 Exploring and Adopting

Focus Culture Leadership Leadership team National Center on Response to Intervention 42 Focus: Why did schools choose RTI? To close the student achievement gap

To meet Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) every year with every subgroup To address undesirable and disruptive behaviors National Center on Response to Intervention 43 Culture:RTI = All Staff + All Kids Schools reported a cultural shift in language and thinking.

Teachers think less about teaching content and more about ensuring that students learn. We [staff] all believe that all students can learn. All staff own all students; no more my student or his student. All teachers can teach reading and mathematics. National Center on Response to Intervention 44 Leadership Strong principal leadership in the middle schools: Provided ongoing professional development.

Provided staff with sufficient time to understand RTI. Addressed staff questions and concerns. Led school structural changes to accommodate collaboration and intervention time. Promoted staff buy-in through hands-on involvement in the decisionmaking process. Ensured that new hires are willing to embrace RTI. National Center on Response to Intervention 45 Leadership Team A leadership team should be established early in the process. This team:

Facilitates decision making about implementation. Establishes professional development needs. Plans implementation activities. Leads data-based decision-making needs. National Center on Response to Intervention 46 Leadership Team The Leadership Team emphasized systemic leadership. Principals emphasized that RTI implementation decisions were made in collaboration with school staff members.

Staff leaders facilitated and promoted buy-in and understanding of RTI among colleagues. As an administrator, it is critical to have the teachers push [RTI] forward, while the administrator is in the background pushing. Middle School Principal National Center on Response to Intervention 47 Think-Pair-Share Exploring and Adopting

How will RTI benefit your school (focus)? Are staff ready to embrace RTI (culture)? Will the principal lead the RTI changes (leadership)? Which staff members are helping lead RTI (systemic leadership)? National Center on Response to Intervention 48 Implementation Guiding Questions: Exploring and Adopting Handout Take a few minutes to review the handout and

think about questions. National Center on Response to Intervention 49 Planning Building staff knowledge Continuous professional development Implementation plan development National Center on Response to Intervention

50 Staff Knowledge Building Key actions for staff understanding were: Clearly stating the purpose, goals, and expected outcomes of RTI. Developing an implementation plan with staff. Establishing frequently used communication pathways. Listening to and addressing staff concerns. Having a shared language of RTI concepts. National Center on Response to Intervention

51 Continuous Professional Development The ongoing knowledge building served to: Facilitate understanding of the RTI process. Prepare teachers to: Teach interventions with fidelity. Monitor students progress. Use data to make instructional decisions. National Center on Response to Intervention

Professional development takes a lot of resources and time, but it is necessary to keep all staff informed and up-to-date on the innovation, techniques, and curriculum. Middle School Coach 52 Implementation Plan Development In the middle schools, the Leadership Teams: Established a timeline to focus on RTI planning, guidance, and implementation steps. Clearly defined their implementation goals and schedule for essential components, assessment tools, and intervention programs.

Identified staff members to lead implementation activities for each essential component (e.g., screening, progress monitoring, and multi-level instruction). Ensured that their coaches were prepared to assist teachers in implementing interventions and assessing fidelity. National Center on Response to Intervention 53 Think-Pair-Share Planning What are some activities that you can easily establish to build staff knowledge?

What professional development opportunities can you access to begin the implementation process? How will you begin the plan development process? National Center on Response to Intervention 54 Implementation Guiding Questions: Planning Handout Take a few minutes to review the handout and think about questions.

National Center on Response to Intervention 55 Implementing One essential component One small group National Center on Response to Intervention 56

One Essential Component Build model with one component at a time. For example, first screening, then data-based decision making, then progress monitoring, then intervention levels. Administrators recommended: Having a timeline for implementation of each essential component. Training staff in advance of each component implementation. Beginning with a component that makes sense for the school based on existing tools, structures, and resources. National Center on Response to Intervention

57 One Small Group Build model with one pilot group at a time. For example, implementing all essential components with one class of students. Administrators recommended: Collecting data from the pilot group. Investigating which components and their associated features worked well. Identifying which components and their associated features needed to be refined. Scaling-up to other classes, grades, and content areas.

National Center on Response to Intervention 58 Think-Pair-Share Implementing Where are you in your current implementation activities? What implementation method might work best for your schools current resources, staff, and students? National Center on

Response to Intervention 59 Implementation Guiding Questions: Implementing Handout Take a few minutes to review the handout and think about questions. National Center on Response to Intervention 60

Testimonies From Principals RTI is possible in middle schools. Assess the resources already in existence; then see what else is needed. Apply innovative techniques and interventions. Use your data: keep what works, change what doesnt. Leadership is key to putting change in motion. Combine professional development with coaching. Provide time for teachers to integrate and use what they have learned. National Center on Response to Intervention 61

Key Findings From Middle Schools Strong, cohesive, knowledgeable building leadership Use of open, transparent communication Continuous professional development opportunities Establishment of a leadership/planning team Routine use of data-based decision-making practices

National Center on Response to Intervention 62 Next Steps Review Implementation Guiding Questions handout and develop implementation plans. Review Essential Components Guiding Questions handout and develop essential components plans. Communicate information to colleagues. National Center on

Response to Intervention 63 Additional Resources http://www.rti4success.org RTI Implementation Processes for Middle Schools (June 2011) http://www.rti4success.org/pdf/0644MS_RTI_Implementation_Brief_d3.pdf RTI Scheduling Processes for Middle Schools (July 2011) http://www.rti4success.org/pdf/0681MS_RTI_Rescheduling_Brief_d2.pdf RTI in Middle Schools: Frequently Asked Questions (August 2011) http://www.rti4success.org/pdf/0572%20MS%20RTI%20FAQs%20d5[1].pdf

Middle School Essential Components report (Fall 2012) National Center on Response to Intervention 64 National Center on Response to Intervention This document was produced under U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs Grant No. H326E070004. Grace Zamora Durn and Tina Diamond serve as the OSEP project officers. The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent the

positions or policies of the U.S. Department of Education. No official endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education of any product, commodity, service, or enterprise mentioned in this publication is intended or should be inferred. This product is in the public domain. Authorization to reproduce it in whole or in part is granted. While permission to reprint this publication is not necessary, the citation should be http://www.rti4success.org. National Center on Response to Intervention 65

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