"You are your child's first teacher."

"You are your child's first teacher."

childs first teacher. Your teachers goal is simple; to help you reach yours. We have 18 years to teach our children everything they need to know. 8 9 18 Common messages from home and school help children be successful. Working together, we can help your child reach their full potential. New York State has adopted national Core Curriculum Standards for English Language Arts and Mathematics. The goal of the new standards is to prepare students at all levels to be college and career ready. Students Who are College and Career Ready in Reading, Writing, Speaking, Listening, and Language.

They demonstrate independence. They build strong content knowledge. They respond to the varying demands of audience, task, purpose, and discipline. They comprehend as well as critique. They value evidence. They use technology and digital media strategically and capably. They come to understand other perspectives and cultures. http://www.p12.nysed.gov/ciai/common_core_standards New NYS 3rd Grade Reading Standards Reading Standards for Literature Grade 3 students: Responding to Literature 9. Compare and contrast the most important Key Ideas and Details points and key 11. 11. Recognize and make connections in narratives, poetry, and 1. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding details presented in two texts on the same drama to other texts, ideas, cultural perspectives, personal of topic. a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the events, and situations. answers. Range of Reading and Level of Text Self-select text based upon personal preferences. 2. Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths

Complexity from 10. By the end of the year, read and diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in comprehend informational the text. Reading Standards for Informational Text texts, including history/social studies, 3. Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, Grade 3 students science, and motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions Key Ideas and Details contribute to the sequence of events. technical texts, at the high end of the grades Craft and Structure 23 text 1. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of 4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are complexity band independently and a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the used in a text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral proficiently. answers. language. 5. Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, chapter, 2. Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details scene, scene, and stanza; stanza; describe how each successive part builds on Reading Standards: Foundational Skills and explain how they support the main idea. earlier sections. Grade 3 students: 3. Describe the relationship between a series of historical 6. Distinguish their own point of view from that of the Phonics and Word Recognition narrator or those of the characters. events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical Integration of Knowledge and Ideas 3. Know and apply grade-level phonics and procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, 7. Explain how specific aspects of a texts illustrations word analysis sequence, and cause/effect. contribute to what is conveyed by the words in a story skills in decoding words. (e.g., create mood, emphasize aspects of a character or Craft and Structure setting). a. Identify and know the meaning of the 4. Determine the meaning of general academic and domainspecific 8. (Not applicable to literature) most common

9. Compare and contrast the themes, settings, and plots of words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 3 prefixes and derivational suffixes. stories written by the same author about the same or topic or subject area. area. similar characters (e.g., in books from a series). b. Decode words with common Latin 10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, 5. Use text features and search tools (e.g., key words, suffixes. including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of sidebars, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a c. Decode multisyllable words. the grades 23 text complexity band independently and given topic efficiently. d. Read grade-appropriate irregularly proficiently. 6. Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author spelled words. of a text. Integration of Knowledge and Ideas 7. Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur). 8. Describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text (e.g., comparison, cause/effect, first/second/third in a sequence). Fluency 4. Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. a. Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding. b. Read grade-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression

on successive readings. c. Use context to confirm or self-correct New NYS 3rd Grade Writing Standards Writing Standards Grade 3 students: Text Types and Purposes 1. Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons. a. Introduce the topic or text they are writing about, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure that lists reasons. b. Provide reasons that support the opinion. c. Use linking words and phrases (e.g., because, because, therefore, therefore, since, since, for example) example) to connect opinion and reasons. d. Provide a concluding statement or section. 2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. a. Introduce a topic and group related information together; include illustrations when useful to aiding comprehension. b. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, and details. c. Use linking words and phrases (e.g., also, also, another, another, and, and, more, more, but) but) to connect ideas within categories of information. d. Provide a concluding statement or section. 3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences

or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. a. Establish a situation and introduce a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. b. Use dialogue and descriptions of actions, thoughts, and feelings to develop experiences and events or show the response of characters to situations. c. Use temporal words and phrases to signal event order. d. Provide a sense of closure. Production and Distribution of Writing 4. With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 13 above.) 5. With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 13 up to and including grade 3 on page 29.) 6. With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and publish writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others. Research to Build and Present Knowledge 7. Conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic. 8. Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources; take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided categories. 9. (Begins in grade 4) Range of Writing 10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of disciplineResponding to Literature 11. Create and present a poem, narrative, play, art work, or personal response to a particular author or theme studied in class. specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

http://www.p12.nysed.gov/ciai/ common_core_standard New NYS 3rd Grade Speaking and Listening Standards Grade 3 students: rd Conventions of Standard English 1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. a. Explain the function of nouns, pronouns, verbs, Grade 3 students: adjectives, and adverbs in general and their functions Comprehension and Collaboration 1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions in particular sentences. agreeable/ agreeable/disagreeable, disagreeable, (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse b. Form and use regular and irregular plural nouns. comfortable/ comfortable/uncomfortable, uncomfortable, partners on grade 3 topics and texts, texts, building on others ideas c. Use abstract nouns (e.g., childhood). care/ childhood). care/careless, careless, heat/ heat/preheat). preheat). and expressing their own clearly. d. Form and use regular and irregular verbs.

c. Use a known root word as a clue to the a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied meaning of an e. Form and use the simple (e.g., I walked; walked; I walk; walk; I will required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to unknown word with the same root (e.g., walk) walk) verb tenses. explore ideas under discussion. company, company, f. Ensure subject-verb and pronoun-antecedent b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., companion). companion). gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others agreement.* d. Use glossaries or beginning dictionaries, with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and g. Form and use comparative and superlative adjectives texts under discussion). both print and adverbs, and choose between them depending on c. Ask questions to check understanding of information and digital, to determine or clarify the presented, stay on topic, and link their comments to what is to be modified. precise the remarks of others. h. Use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions. d. Explain their own ideas and understanding in light of meaning of key words and phrases. i. Produce simple, compound, and complex sentences. the discussion. 5. Demonstrate understanding of word e. Seek to understand and communicate with individuals

2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard relationships and from different cultural backgrounds. nuances in word meanings. 2. Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when read aloud or information presented in diverse media and writing. a. Distinguish the literal and nonliteral formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. meanings of a. Use correct capitalization. 3. Ask and answer questions about information from a words and phrases in context (e.g., take b. Use commas and quotation marks to mark direct speaker, offering appropriate elaboration and detail. Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas steps). steps). speech and quotations from a text. 4. Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an b. Identify real-life connections between c. Use a comma before a coordinating conjunction in a

experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive words and details, speaking clearly at an understandable pace. compound sentence. their use (e.g., describe people who are 5. Create engaging audio recordings of stories or poems that d. Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting demonstrate fluid reading at an understandable pace; add friendly or visual displays when appropriate to emphasize or enhance references as needed. helpful). helpful). certain facts or details. Knowledge of Language c. Distinguish shades of meaning among 6. Speak in complete sentences when appropriate to task 3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when and related words situation in order to provide requested detail or writing, speaking, reading, or listening. that describe states of mind or degrees of clarification. (See grade 3 Language standards 1 and 3 on a. Choose words and phrases for effect.* certainty page 26 for specific expectations.) b. Recognize and observe differences between the (e.g., knew, knew, believed, believed, suspected, suspected, heard, heard, wondered). wondered). conventions of spoken and written standard English. 6. Acquire and use accurately gradeVocabulary Acquisition and Use appropriate 4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiplemeaning conversational, general academic, and

word and phrases based on grade 3 reading and domain-specific content, content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies. words and phrases, including those that a. Use sentence-level context as a clue to the meaning of signal spatial and a word or phrase. temporal relationships (e.g., After dinner b. Determine the meaning of the new word formed that night we went looking for them). them). when a known affix is added to a known word (e.g., New NYS 3 Grade Language Standards New NYS 3rd Grade Math Standards Grade 3 Overview - Mathematics Operations and Algebraic Thinking Represent and solve problems involving multiplication and division. Understand properties of multiplication and the relationship between multiplication and division. Multiply and divide within 100. Solve problems involving the four operations, and identify and explain patterns in arithmetic. Number and Operations in Base Ten Use place value understanding and properties of operations to perform multi-digit arithmetic. Number and OperationsFractions Develop understanding of fractions as numbers. Measurement and Data Solve problems involving measurement and

estimation of intervals of time, liquid volumes, and masses of objects. Represent and interpret data. Geometric measurement: understand concepts of area and relate area to multiplication and to addition. Geometric measurement: recognize perimeter as an attribute of plane figures and distinguish between linear and area measures. Geometry Reason with shapes and their attributes. Operations & Algebraic Thinking 3.OA Represent and solve problems involving multiplication and division. 1. Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a total number of objects can be expressed as 5 7. 2. Interpret whole-number quotients of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 56 8 as the number of objects in each share when 56 objects are partitioned equally into 8 shares, or as a number of shares when 56 objects are partitioned into equal shares of 8 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a number of shares or a number of groups can be expressed as 56 8. 3. Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.1 4. Determine the unknown whole number in a multiplication or division equation relating three whole numbers. For example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the

equations 8 ? = 48, 5 = _ 3, 6 6 = ? Understand properties of multiplication and the relationship between multiplication and division. 5. Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide.2 Examples: If 6 4 = 24 is known, then 4 6 = 24 is also known. (Commutative property of multiplication.) 3 5 2 can be found by 3 5 = 15, then 15 2 = 30, or by 5 2 = 10, then 3 10 = 30. (Associative property of multiplication.) Knowing that 8 5 = 40 and 8 2 = 16, one can find 8 7 as 8 (5 + 2) = (8 5) + (8 2) = 40 + 16 = 56. (Distributive property.) 6. Understand division as an unknown-factor problem. For example, find 32 8 by finding the number that makes 32 when multiplied by 8. Multiply and divide within 100. 7. Fluently multiply and divide within 100, using strategies such as the relationship between multiplication and division (e.g., knowing that 8 5 = 40, one knows 40 5 = 8) or properties of operations. By the end of Grade 3, know from memory all products of two onedigit numbers. Solve problems involving the four operations, and identify and explain patterns in arithmetic. 22 8. Solve two-step word problems using the standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies including rounding.3

9. Identify arithmetic patterns (including patterns in the addition table or multiplication table), and explain them using properties of operations. For example, observe that 4 times a number is always even, and explain why 4 times a number can be decomposed into two equal addends. Number & Operations in Base Ten 3.NBT Use place value understanding and properties of operations to perform multi-digit arithmetic.1 1. Use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100. 2. Fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction. 3. Multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10 in the range 1090 (e.g., 9 80, 5 60) using strategies based on place value and properties of operations. Number & OperationsFractions 3.NF Develop understanding of fractions as numbers. 1. Understand a fraction 1/b 1/b as the quantity formed by 1 part when a whole is partitioned into b equal parts; understand a fraction a/b as the quantity formed by a parts of size 1/b 1/b. 2. Understand a fraction as a number on the number line; represent fractions on a number line diagram. a. Represent a fraction 1/b

1/b on a number line diagram by defining the interval from 0 to 1 as the whole and partitioning it into b equal parts. Recognize that each part has size 1/b 1/b and that the endpoint of the part based at 0 locates the number 1/b 1/b on the number line. b. Represent a fraction a/b on a number line diagram by marking off a lengths 1/b 1/b from 0. Recognize that the New NYS 3rd Grade Math Standards resulting interval has size a/b and that its endpoint locates the number a/b on the number line. 3. Explain equivalence of fractions in special cases, and compare fractions by reasoning about their size. a. Understand two fractions as equivalent (equal) if they are the same size, or the same point on a number line. b. Recognize and generate simple equivalent fractions, e.g., 1/2 = 2/4, 4/6 = 2/3). Explain why the fractions are equivalent, e.g., by using a visual fraction model. c. Express whole numbers as fractions, and recognize fractions that are equivalent to whole numbers. Examples: Express 3 in the form 3 = 3/1; recognize that 6/1 = 6; locate 4/4 and 1 at the same point of a number line diagram. d. Compare two fractions with the same numerator or the same denominator by reasoning about their size. Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two fractions refer to the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, or <, and

justify the conclusions, e.g., by using a visual fraction model. Measurement & Data 3.MD Solve problems involving measurement and estimation of intervals of time, liquid volumes, and masses of objects. 1. Tell and write time to the nearest minute and measure time intervals in minutes. Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals in minutes, e.g., by representing the problem on a number line diagram. 2. Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters (l).1 Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve onestep word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as a beaker with a measurement scale) to represent the problem.2 Represent and interpret data. 3. Draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several categories. Solve one- and two-step how many more and how many less problems using information presented in scaled bar graphs. For example, draw a bar graph in which each square in the bar graph might represent 5 pets. 4. Generate measurement data by measuring lengths using rulers marked with halves and fourths of an inch. Show the data by making a line plot, where the horizontal scale is marked off in appropriate units whole numbers,

halves, or quarters. Geometric measurement: understand concepts of area and relate area to multiplication and to addition. 5. Recognize area as an attribute of plane figures and understand concepts of area measurement. a. A square with side length 1 unit, called a unit square, is said to have one square unit of area, and can be used to measure area. b. A plane figure which can be covered without gaps or overlaps by n unit squares is said to have an area of n square units. 6. Measure areas by counting unit squares (square cm, square m, square in, square ft, and improvised units). 7. Relate area to the operations of multiplication and addition. a. Find the area of a rectangle with wholenumber side lengths by tiling it, and show that the area is the same as would be found by multiplying the side lengths. b. Multiply side lengths to find areas of rectangles with whole-number side lengths in the context of solving real world and mathematical problems, and represent whole-number products as rectangular areas in mathematical reasoning. c. Use tiling to show in a concrete case that the area of a rectangle with whole-number c is the sum of a b and a c. Use area models to represent the distributive property in mathematical reasoning. d. Recognize area as additive. Find areas of

rectilinear figures by decomposing them into non-overlapping rectangles and adding the areas of the nonoverlapping parts, applying this technique to solve real world problems. Geometric measurement: recognize perimeter as an attribute of plane figures and distinguish between linear and area measures. 8. Solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons, including finding the perimeter given the side lengths, finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas or with the same area and different perimeters. Geometry 3.G Reason with shapes and their attributes. 1. Understand that shapes in different categories (e.g., rhombuses, rectangles, and others) may share attributes (e.g., having four sides), and that the shared attributes can define a larger category (e.g., quadrilaterals). Recognize rhombuses, rectangles, and squares as examples of quadrilaterals, and draw examples of quadrilaterals that do not belong to any of these subcategories. 2. Partition shapes into parts with equal areas. Express the area of each part as a unit fraction of the whole. For example, partition a shape into 4 parts with equal area, and describe the area of each part as 1/4 of the area of the shape. http://www.p12.nysed.gov/ciai/ common_core_standard

How will I assist your child to meet the NYS Standards? Provide instruction using various methods Provide instruction using various methods Create small groups to focus instruction Work individually with your child every day Differentiate instruction to meet your individual childs needs Reteach concepts to your child as needed Challenge your child when he/she has mastered grade level concepts How can you assist your child in meeting the NYS Standards? Daily homework assignments Math lesson reinforcement practice sheets or fact worksheets Reading Comprehension Assignments Grammar practice sheets (*2 days per week) Monitor 100 minutes of reading each week Math fact practice to mastery Corrections each weekend Children learn more than just academics in school. My child will build their character by learning: Respect Independence Responsibility How will I support your childs character building in school?

Respect No Bullying initiative (Olweus Program) Character Education Program Property of school and others Teachers and school staff How can you support your childs character building at home? Respect Support the No Bullying initiative Reinforce the monthly character traits Student/teacher Child/parent How will I support your childs character building in school? Independence Complete list of designated tasks On-task in reading and math centers Hand in homework, notes, and graded items Organize desk and folders appropriately

Use restroom at end of hallway Tie shoes and zip coats How can you support your childs character building at home? Independence Allow your child to remove items from their folder when they arrive home Expect your child to place items into their backpacks Require your child to seek you out for signatures in planners, folders, and/or forms Insist on your child packing their own snack and/or lunch How will I support your childs character building in school? Responsibility Attend to lessons fully Ask clarifying questions Request assistance if needed Participate in all activities Follow written and oral directions Complete homework and class work in a timely manner Record items in planner accurately

Act appropriately in the classroom and school building How can you support your childs character building at home? Responsibility Impress upon your child that he/she is responsible for their learning at school Consider your child responsible for all home study to be completed Hold your child responsible for their actions on the bus, in the classroom, and elsewhere in the school building Children will make behavioral mistakes. Not my child! Who told you to do it? Why did you do it? I dont know. Classroom Website Thank you for coming tonight. Working together, we can ensure you child has a successful third grade year.

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