Programming Languages & Software Engineering

Programming Languages & Software Engineering

CSE341: Programming Languages Lecture 10 ML Modules Brett Wortzman Summer 2019 Slides originally created by Dan Grossman Modules For larger programs, one top-level sequence of bindings is poor Especially because a binding can use all earlier (nonshadowed) bindings So ML has structures to define modules structure MyModule = struct bindings end Inside a module, can use earlier bindings as usual Can have any kind of binding (val, datatype, exception, ...) Outside a module, refer to earlier modules bindings via ModuleName.bindingName Just like List.foldl and Char.toLower; now you can define your own modules Summer 2019

CSE341: Programming Languages 2 Example structure MyMathLib = struct fun fact x = if x=0 then 1 else x * fact(x-1) val half_pi = Math.pi / 2 fun doubler x = x * 2 end Summer 2019

CSE341: Programming Languages 3 Namespace management So far, this is just namespace management Giving a hierarchy to names to avoid shadowing Allows different modules to reuse names, e.g., map Very important, but not very interesting Summer 2019 CSE341: Programming Languages 4 Optional: Open Can use open ModuleName to get direct access to a

modules bindings Never necessary; just a convenience; often bad style Often better to create local val-bindings for just the bindings you use a lot, e.g., val map = List.map But doesnt work for patterns And open can be useful, e.g., for testing code Summer 2019 CSE341: Programming Languages 5 Signatures A signature is a type for a module What bindings does it have and what are their types Can define a signature and ascribe it to modules example: signature MATHLIB =

sig val fact : int -> int val half_pi : real val doubler : int -> int end structure MyMathLib :> MATHLIB = struct fun fact x = val half_pi = Math.pi / 2.0 fun doubler x = x * 2 end Summer 2019 CSE341: Programming Languages 6 In general

Signatures signature SIGNAME = sig types-for-bindings end Can include variables, types, datatypes, and exceptions defined in module Ascribing a signature to a module structure MyModule :> SIGNAME = struct bindings end Module will not type-check unless it matches the signature, meaning it has all the bindings at the right types Note: SML has other forms of ascription; we will stick with these CSE341: Programming Languages [opaque signatures] Summer 2019 7

Hiding things Real value of signatures is to to hide bindings and type definitions So far, just documenting and checking the types Hiding implementation details is the most important strategy for writing correct, robust, reusable software So first remind ourselves that functions already do well for some forms of hiding Summer 2019 CSE341: Programming Languages 8 Hiding with functions These three functions are totally equivalent: no client can tell which we are using (so we can change our choice later):

fun fun val fun double x = x*2 double x = x+x y = 2 double x = x*y Defining helper functions locally is also powerful Can change/remove functions later and know it affects no other code Would be convenient to have private top-level functions too So two functions could easily share a helper function ML does this via signatures that omit bindings Summer 2019

CSE341: Programming Languages 9 Example Outside the module, MyMathLib.doubler is simply unbound So cannot be used [directly] Fairly powerful, very simple idea signature MATHLIB = sig val fact : int -> int val half_pi : real end structure MyMathLib :> MATHLIB = struct fun fact x = val half_pi = Math.pi / 2.0 fun doubler x = x * 2

end Summer 2019 CSE341: Programming Languages 10 A larger example [mostly see the code] Now consider a module that defines an Abstract Data Type (ADT) A type of data and operations on it Our example: rational numbers supporting add and toString structure Rational1 = struct datatype rational = Whole of int | Frac of int*int exception BadFrac (*internal functions gcd and reduce not on slide*) fun make_frac (x,y) = fun add (r1,r2) =

fun toString r = end Summer 2019 CSE341: Programming Languages 11 Library spec and invariants Properties [externally visible guarantees, up to library writer] Disallow denominators of 0 Return strings in reduced form (4 not 4/1, 3/2 not 9/6) No infinite loops or exceptions Invariants [part of the implementation, not the modules spec] All denominators are greater than 0 All rational values returned from functions are reduced Summer 2019

CSE341: Programming Languages 12 More on invariants Our code maintains the invariants and relies on them Maintain: make_frac disallows 0 denominator, removes negative denominator, and reduces result add assumes invariants on inputs, calls reduce if needed Rely: gcd does not work with negative arguments, but no denominator can be negative add uses math properties to avoid calling reduce toString assumes its argument is already reduced Summer 2019

CSE341: Programming Languages 13 A first signature With what we know so far, this signature makes sense: gcd and reduce not visible outside the module signature RATIONAL_A = sig datatype rational = Whole of int | Frac of int*int exception BadFrac val make_frac : int * int -> rational val add : rational * rational -> rational val toString : rational -> string end structure Rational1 :> RATIONAL_A = Summer 2019

CSE341: Programming Languages 14 The problem By revealing the datatype definition, we let clients violate our invariants by directly creating values of type Rational1.rational At best a comment saying must use Rational1.make_frac signature RATIONAL_A = sig datatype rational = Whole of int | Frac of int*int Any of these would lead to exceptions, infinite loops, or wrong results, which is why the modules code would never return them Rational1.Frac(1,0) Rational1.Frac(3,~2)

Summer 2019 CSE341: Programming Languages 15 Rational1.Frac(9,6) So hide more Key idea: An ADT must hide the concrete type definition so clients cannot create invariant-violating values of the type directly Alas, this attempt doesnt work because the signature now uses a type rational that is not known to exist: signature RATIONAL_WRONG = sig exception BadFrac val make_frac : int * int -> rational val add : rational * rational -> rational val toString : rational -> string end

structure Rational1 :> RATIONAL_WRONG = Summer 2019 CSE341: Programming Languages 16 Abstract types So ML has a feature for exactly this situation: In a signature: type foo means the type exists, but clients do not know its definition signature RATIONAL_B = sig type rational exception BadFrac val make_frac : int * int -> rational val add : rational * rational -> rational

val toString : rational -> string end structure Rational1 :> RATIONAL_B = Summer 2019 CSE341: Programming Languages 17 This works! (And is a Really Big Deal) signature RATIONAL_B = sig type rational exception BadFrac val make_frac : int * int -> rational val add : rational * rational -> rational val toString : rational -> string end

Nothing a client can do to violate invariants and properties: Only way to make first rational is Rational1.make_frac After that can use only Rational1.make_frac, Rational1.add, and Rational1.toString Hides constructors and patterns dont even know whether or not Rational1.rational is a datatype But clients can still pass around fractions in any way Summer 2019 CSE341: Programming Languages 18 Two key restrictions So we have two powerful ways to use signatures for hiding: 1. Deny bindings exist (val-bindings, fun-bindings, constructors) 2. Make types abstract (so clients cannot create values of them or access their pieces directly)

(Later we will see a signature can also make a bindings type more specific than it is within the module, but this is less important) Summer 2019 CSE341: Programming Languages 19 A cute twist In our example, exposing the Whole constructor is no problem In SML we can expose it as a function since the datatype binding in the module does create such a function Still hiding the rest of the datatype Still does not allow using Whole as a pattern signature RATIONAL_C = sig type rational

exception BadFrac val Whole : int -> rational val make_frac : int * int -> rational val add : rational * rational -> rational val toString : rational -> string end Summer 2019 CSE341: Programming Languages 20 Signature matching Have so far relied on an informal notion of, does a module typecheck given a signature? As usual, there are precise rules structure Foo :> BAR is allowed if: Every non-abstract type in BAR is provided in Foo, as specified Every abstract type in BAR is provided in Foo in some way Can be a datatype or a type synonym

Every val-binding in BAR is provided in Foo, possibly with a more general and/or less abstract internal type Discussed more general types earlier in course Will see example soon Every exception in BAR is provided in Foo Of course Foo can have more bindings (implicit in above rules) Summer 2019 CSE341: Programming Languages 21 Equivalent implementations A key purpose of abstraction is to allow different implementations to be equivalent No client can tell which you are using So can improve/replace/choose implementations later Easier to do if you start with more abstract signatures (reveal only what you must)

Now: Another structure that can also have signature RATIONAL_A, RATIONAL_B, or RATIONAL_C But only equivalent under RATIONAL_B or RATIONAL_C (ignoring overflow) Next: A third equivalent structure implemented very differently Summer 2019 CSE341: Programming Languages 22 Equivalent implementations Example (see code file): structure Rational2 does not keep rationals in reduced form, instead reducing them at last moment in toString

Also make gcd and reduce local functions Not equivalent under RATIONAL_A Rational1.toString(Rational1.Frac(9,6)) = "9/6" Rational2.toString(Rational2.Frac(9,6)) = "3/2" Equivalent under RATIONAL_B or RATIONAL_C Different invariants, but same properties Essential that type rational is abstract Summer 2019 CSE341: Programming Languages 23 More interesting example Given a signature with an abstract type, different structures can: Have that signature But implement the abstract type differently Such structures might or might not be equivalent

Example (see code): type rational = int * int Does not have signature RATIONAL_A Equivalent to both previous examples under RATIONAL_B or RATIONAL_C Summer 2019 CSE341: Programming Languages 24 More interesting example structure Rational3 = struct type rational = int * int exception BadFrac fun

fun fun fun end make_frac (x,y) = Whole i = (i,1) (* needed for RATIONAL_C *) add ((a,b)(c,d)) = (a*d+b*c,b*d) toString r = (* reduce at last minute *) Summer 2019 CSE341: Programming Languages 25 Some interesting details Internally make_frac has type int * int -> int * int,

but externally int * int -> rational Client cannot tell if we return argument unchanged Could give type rational -> rational in signature, but this is awful: makes entire module unusable why? Internally Whole has type 'a -> 'a * int but externally int -> rational This matches because we can specialize 'a to int and then abstract int * int to rational Whole cannot have types 'a -> int * int or 'a -> rational (must specialize all 'a uses) Type-checker figures all this out for us Summer 2019 CSE341: Programming Languages 26 Cant mix-and-match module bindings

Modules with the same signatures still define different types So things like this do not type-check: Rational1.toString(Rational2.make_frac(9,6)) Rational3.toString(Rational2.make_frac(9,6)) This is a crucial feature for type system and module properties: Different modules have different internal invariants! In fact, they have different type definitions Rational1.rational looks like Rational2.rational, but clients and the type-checker do not know that Rational3.rational is int*int not a datatype! Summer 2019 CSE341: Programming Languages 27

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