Sexual Harassment, Sexual Assault, Dating Violence, and Stalking:

Sexual Harassment, Sexual Assault, Dating Violence, and Stalking:

Sexual Harassment, Sexual Assault, Dating Violence, and Stalking: New State Mandates for Postsecondary Educational Institutions Training Slide #1 1 Topics Covered What Postsecondary Institutions Must Do Definitions Policy Information Employee Reporting

Requirements Confidentiality & Victim Rights Consequences of Failing to Report or False Reporting Retaliation Remedies and Support Services Administrative Reporting Requirements Disciplinary Process Withdrawal and Graduation Other Institutional Duties

Note: In compliance with Senate Bill 212 and House Bill 1735, 86th Texas Legislature, this training was developed by the Title IX Training Advisory Committee in November 2019. Training Slide #2 2 What Postsecondary Institutions Must Do under the New Law Training Slide #3 3 What Postsecondary Institutions Must Do Adopt policies on sexual harassment, sexual assault,

dating violence, and stalking Implement new and improved processes for reporting incidents Develop comprehensive prevention and outreach programs Provide amnesty or immunity to students and employees who report incidents Substantially comply with the mandates or be subject to financial penalties for noncompliance Training Slide #4 4 What about Title IX? Title IX and other federal laws, including Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) and Clery

remain in full force and effect for federal enforcement of sex discrimination impacting any persons access to a federally funded education program, benefit, or activity. (Pending from the U.S. Dept. of Education are regulations expected to provide new and different requirements for compliance with Title IX.) In 2019, the 86th Texas Legislature enacted two new laws relating to sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking: Senate Bill 212: authored by Senator Joan Huffman House Bill 1735: authored by Representative Donna Howard Training Slide #5 5

What has Changed? SB 212 Establishes New Requirements for: Reporting incidents of sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking by employees of postsecondary institutions HB 1735 Establishes New Requirements that Postsecondary Institutions: Adopt policies on sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking Provide training to new undergraduate students (first-year and transfers) Develop Prevention and Outreach Programs Provide trauma-informed investigation training to all law enforcement employees And more Training Slide #6

6 Sexual Misconduct Policy Mandates Each institution shall adopt governing board-approved policy on sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking applicable to enrolled students and employees. The policy must include: Definitions of prohibited behavior Sanctions for violations Protocol for reporting and responding to reports which includes electronic reporting Interim measures to protect alleged victims, including protection from retaliation and may allow measures for others

involved as needed Training Slide #7 7 Definition of Terms Training Slide #8 8 Definitions of Reportable Conduct Sexual Harassment "Sexual harassment" means unwelcome, sex-based verbal or physical conduct that: (A) in the employment context, unreasonably interferes with a

person's work performance or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work environment; or (B) in the education context, is sufficiently severe, persistent, or pervasive that the conduct interferes with a student's ability to participate in or benefit from educational programs or activities at a postsecondary educational institution. (Citation: Texas Education Code, Sections 51.251 & 51.281) Training Slide #9 9 Definitions of Reportable Conduct Sexual Assault Sexual assault means an offense that meets the definition of rape,

fondling, incest, or statutory rape as used in the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting program: (A) Rape means the penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim. (B) Fondling means the touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her age or because of his/her temporary or permanent mental incapacity. (C) Incest means sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law. (D) Statutory Rape means sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent. (Citation: 34 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 668.46) Training Slide #10

10 Definitions of Reportable Conduct Dating Violence Dating violence means violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim. (A) The existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the reporting party's statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship. (B) For the purposes of this definition (1) Dating violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse. (2) Dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of

domestic violence. (Citation: 34 CFR 668.46) Training Slide #11 11 Definitions of Reportable Conduct Stalking Stalking means engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for the person's safety or the safety of others; or suffer substantial emotional distress. For the purposes of this definition: (A) Course of conduct means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts in which the stalker directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means, follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about a person, or interferes with a person's property.

(B) Reasonable person means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the victim. (C) Substantial emotional distress means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling. (Citation: 34 CFR 668.46) Training Slide #12 12 Policy on Sexual Misconduct, to include Sexual Harassment, Sexual Assault, Dating Violence, and Stalking

Training Slide #13 13 Sexual Misconduct Policy Mandates Each policy must include: The importance of a victim of sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, or stalking going to a hospital for treatment and preservation of evidence, if applicable, as soon as practicable after the incident The right of a victim of sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, or stalking to report the incident to the institution and to receive a prompt and equitable resolution of the report The right of the victim of a crime to choose whether to report the crime to law enforcement, to be assisted by the institution in reporting the crime, or to decline to report the crime to law enforcement

Note: See Title IX Coordinator Sexual Misconduct Policy Checklist in the Training Appendix. Training Slide #14 14 Sexual Misconduct Policy Mandates Each institution shall review its sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, or stalking policy at least every two years and shall revise the policy and obtain approval from the institutions governing board. Training Slide #15

15 Sexual Misconduct Policy Mandates Your institutions policy must: Be in the student and personnel/faculty handbooks or institutional equivalents Have a webpage dedicated to the policy Include a clearly identifiable link on the institutions homepage Training Slide #16 16

Sexual Misconduct Policy Mandates Each institution must require each freshman or undergraduate transfer student to attend an orientation on the institutions sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking policy. Before or during the first semester or term of enrollment This orientation may be online Training Slide #17 17 Sexual Misconduct Policy Protocol

As part of the protocol for responding to reports of sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, or stalking, each institution must: To the greatest extent practicable based on the number of counselors employed, ensure each alleged victim, alleged perpetrator, and reporters of such incidents has access to counseling provided by a counselor who is not providing counseling to others involved in the incident Allow an alleged victim or alleged perpetrator to drop a course in which both parties are enrolled without academic penalty Training Slide #18 18

Sexual Misconduct Outreach Program Each institution must develop a comprehensive prevention and outreach program on sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, or stalking for enrolled students and employees which provides: a range of strategies to prevent sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, or stalking a public awareness campaign a victim empowerment program primary prevention, bystander intervention, and risk reduction strategies Note: See Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website at: https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/sexualviolence/ Training Slide #19

19 Sexual Misconduct Outreach Program This program shall also provide information regarding the protocol for reporting incidents of sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, or stalking, including the name, office location, and contact information for the Title IX Coordinator and which must: Email the information to students at the beginning of the semester or term Include the information in orientation which may be online Training Slide #20 20

Equal Access Postsecondary educational institutions shall ensure equal access for disabled employees and students. Institutions shall make reasonable efforts to consult with the disability services office of the institution and/or advocacy groups to ensure access for disabled (differently-abled) students and employees. Institutions should ensure websites, policies, and forms are accessible to disabled (differently-abled) employees and students. Training Slide #21 21

Equal Access Example: A student who is blind wishes to report an incident to the Title IX Coordinator. The Title IX Coordinator must ensure the student has equal access to reporting forms, websites, and policies. Training Slide #22 22 Employee Reporting Requirements Training Slide #23

23 New Reporting Requirements All employees* must promptly report to the institutions Title IX coordinator or deputy coordinator: Observations witnessed or information received while in the course and scope of their employment; That the employee reasonably believes constitutes an incident of sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, or stalking; Committed by or against A student who was enrolled at the institution at the time of the incident An employee employed by the institution at the time of the incident * Four categories of employees are excepted from mandatory reporting.

Training Slide #24 24 New Reporting Requirements Example: An accountant in the business office is out to eat at a restaurant with friends on a Saturday evening. During dinner, the accountant overhears someone from the next table talking about working at your institution and being groped by their supervisor. Does the accountant have the report to the Title IX Coordinator? The Texas law would not require the accountant to report, because the accountant was engaged in a personal activity at the time they heard the information and was not performing duties to further the institutions

interests. However, the institutions policy may impose different requirements. Training Slide #25 25 What must be reported by an employee? ALL INFORMATION, unless the report is made to an employee who is designated or licensed to maintain confidentiality. An employee must report: All information relevant to the incident known to the employee

Regardless of when or where the incident occurred For purposes of the institutions investigation To redress the incident via interim measures or other forms of support To convey an alleged victims request for confidentiality Training Slide #26 26 What must be reported by an employee? Example: A lecturer shares with their department chair that a tenured faculty member in the department made unwanted sexual advances toward the lecturer. The lecturer asks the department

chair to keep the concern anonymous. Can the department chair withhold the lecturers name when making the report to the Title IX Coordinator? No. The department chair must share all information known to them with the Title IX Coordinator. The department chair should indicate that the lecturer wishes to remain anonymous, and the Title IX Coordinator will take that into account in moving forward with the matter. Training Slide #27 27 Circumstances in which Employees Must Report Employees shall promptly report information

regarding the occurrence of an incident the employee reasonably believes constitutes sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, or stalking committed by or against a person who was or is a student or employee of the institution at the time of the alleged misconduct. The employee shall report information that they witness, receive first hand, receive second hand or via hearsay, overhear, or are otherwise made aware of. Training Slide #28 28 Circumstances in which Employees Must Report

The employee is required to report regardless of when or where the incident occurred. The exception is when incidents are disclosed at a sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, or stalking public awareness event sponsored by the institution or by a student organization affiliated with the institution. The employee is required to report all known details, including if and how the report was remedied and if the alleged victim has expressed a desire to keep the report confidential. Training Slide #29 29

Circumstances in which Employees Must Report Example: Professor Crane receives an email from a student explaining that they had missed class due to being attacked by an ex. The professor contacts the Title IX Coordinator asking if the professor needs to report, as there were very few details included in the students email. The professor explains they are not sure of when or where the attack happened, or if it involved a student from their institution. Professor Crane should report regardless of when or where the incident occurred, as it involves a student who is enrolled at the institution. Even if there are very few details, Professor Crane should include them all. Training Slide #30

30 Where should reports be made? Reports may be made: Online INSERT LINK TO REPORTING FORM To the institutions Title IX Coordinator INSERT TIX COORD. INFO To the institutions Deputy Title IX Coordinators INSERT TIX DEPUTY INFO Training Slide #31

31 Where should reports be made? In addition to the aforementioned reporting options, students and employees may report incidents in which they were a victim of sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, or stalking in confidence to: INSERT

INSERT INSERT INSERT INSERT INSERT DESIGNATED CONFIDENTIAL RESOURCE (STUDENTS VS ALL) HEALTH PROFESSIONAL COUNSELING CENTER MEDICAL RESOURCE ADVOCACY CENTER CLERGY Training Slide #32

32 Online Reporting Option for Students & Employees An online reporting option must be available for enrolled students and current employees. The reporting option, at a minimum, must: be accessible on the institutions website homepage via a clearly identifiable link allow for anonymous reporting allow for reporting of allegations of sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, or stalking committed against or witnessed by the student or employee be accessible to differently-abled persons Training Slide #33

33 Employees Excepted: Category 1 Employees Who are Students Employees who are enrolled as students at the institution are not mandatory reporters. However, employees may be mandatory reporters under their institutions policies, regulations, rules, or procedures. Training Slide #34 34 Employees Excepted: Category 1

Employees Who are Students Example: The institution designates students who work in student housing as employees who are required to report sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking. A student tells their resident advisor that the student has been sexually harassed by a staff member. Is the resident advisor required to report? The resident advisor is required by the institutions policy (but not by Texas law) to report. Sanctions for failure to report are determined solely by the institutions policy. The Texas law requiring mandatory termination and criminal liability would not apply. Training Slide #35

35 Employees Excepted: Category 2 Employees Who are Victims Victims of sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, or stalking are not mandatory reporters of/for their own incident. Training Slide #36 36 Employees Excepted: Category 3

Employees Receiving Information at a Public Awareness Event Employees are not required to report information about an incident that is disclosed at a public awareness event on sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, or stalking. Training Slide #37 37 Employees Excepted: Category 3 Employees Receiving Information at a Public Awareness Event Example: The universitys Women and Gender Resource Center hosted an event during Sexual Assault Awareness Month where victims of

sexual violence shared their stories publicly from the stage. During the event, a student shares a poem that details a sexual assault the student experienced during their freshman year. An English professor heard this disclosure during the event. Is the professor required to report this to the Title IX Coordinator? No, required reporters are not required to report disclosures made during public awareness events such as Take Back the Night or events hosted during Sexual Assault Awareness Month. Training Slide #38 38 Employees Excepted: Category 4 Confidential Employees (limited disclosure)

Employees whose institution designates them as persons with whom students may speak confidentially may be limited in the information they must report. IF the information they receive was conveyed under circumstances rendering the communication confidential or privileged under other law. NOTE: Employees designated as confidential employees MUST fully report incidents observed or reported to them under circumstances outside the scope of a confidential communication without limitation. Training Slide #39 39

Employees Excepted: Category 4 Confidential Employees (limited disclosure) Example: Ifeoma is a counselor in the universitys Student Counseling Center. Alvin, a student at the university and one of Ifeomas clients, discloses to Ifeoma in a counseling session that he is concerned his roommate James is not doing well following a breakup with Alex, a romantic partner. He explains that James has been calling the former partner at all hours of the night, upwards of 50 times a day sometimes. James has also been standing outside Alexs residence hall to observe Alexs comings and goings, contacting Alexs friends and family through social media to beg them to get Alex to talk to him. Is Ifeoma required to report this information to the Title IX Coordinator? If so, what is she required to report? Yes, Ifeoma is required to report to the Title IX Coordinator that she has become aware of alleged stalking. Ifeoma may not report any additional information.

Training Slide #40 40 Employees Excepted: Category 4 Confidential Employees (limited disclosure) Example: If in the last example, Alvin, instead of being a student client, is a coworker, is Ifeoma required to report this information to the Title IX Coordinator? If so, what is she required to report? If the information is not received in a setting that renders it confidential, Ifeoma must report all information that Alvin has told her about Jamess

alleged stalking behavior. Training Slide #41 41 Confidentiality, Confidential Employees, and Student Advocates Training Slide #42 42 Caution on Confidentiality The new law does not authorize institutions to designate confidential employees for non-students who report sexual harassment, sexual

assault, dating violence, or stalking. However, employees whose duties authorize them to receive and maintain confidential or privileged information may do so for students and non-students, if received under circumstances rendering the communication confidential or privileged under other law. e.g. Licensed professional counselors Healthcare providers Clergy Legal counsel

Training Slide #43 43 Another Caution on Confidentiality for Employee Health or Medical Providers Information regarding an incident of sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence. or stalking that is disclosed to a healthcare provider or medical provider employed by the institution is confidential and may only be shared by the provider with the victims consent. As confidential employees, healthcare and medical providers must report each incident to the institutions Title IX Coordinator by type and must not include any information identifying the victim.

Training Slide #44 44 Another Caution on Confidentiality for Employee Health or Medical Providers Example: Teresita is a certified nurse practitioner in the universitys Student Health and Wellness Center. Teresita sees a patient, Abby, who comes into the office for sexually transmitted disease and pregnancy testing. Abby discloses that she was sexually assaulted the previous night and wants to ensure that she has not contracted any sexually transmitted infections or become pregnant as a result of this sexual assault. She tells Teresita that she wants to report the assault to the police, but she is too overwhelmed to find the police contact information. May Teresita report this sexual assault to the police on Abbys behalf?

Yes, with Abbys consent, Teresita may contact the relevant police department. It is recommended that Teresita gain Abbys written consent for this. Teresita is also required to report to the Title IX Coordinator that there has been a sexual assault. Without Abbys consent, that is the only information that can be reported to the Title IX Coordinator. Training Slide #45 45 Who else may maintain confidential information? The new law authorizes institutions to designate one or more students to serve as Student Advocates. Student Advocates must be enrolled as a student at the institution.

Training Slide #46 46 Advocates under Other Law Advocates for Survivors of Sexual Assault Survivor Advocates must be meet certification requirements set by the Office of the Texas Attorney General. Confidential communications must be made: By a survivor of sexual assault or other sex offense as prescribed by law In the course of receiving sexual assault advocacy services Training Slide #47

47 Advocate Confidentiality under Other Law Texas Government Code Victims of Sexual Assault Victims of sexual assault have the right to confidential communication between a sexual assault advocate or a sexual assault program. A sexual assault advocate or a sexual assault program must be certified according to the minimum standards set forth by the Texas Attorney General. To find a list of sexual assault advocate programs in Texas, click here: http://taasa.org/crisis-center-locator/ For sexual assault program minimum standards requirements for advocate training certification, click here: https://www.texasattorneygeneral.gov/sites/default/files/files/divisions/crime-victims/SATP-Certification-Guide.pdf Texas Family Code Victims of Dating/Family Violence Victims of dating/family violence can seek supportive services from a family violence center with enhanced confidentiality. State law provides privilege for written and oral confidential communications exchanged between a victim of family violence and an advocate at a family violence center.

To find a list of local family violence centers in Texas, click here: http://tcfv.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/tcfv_srv_directory_2019.pdf Training Slide #48 48 Advocates under Other Law Example: A student reports a sexual assault to a Student Advocate or Title IX Coordinator and wants to know if they should or can get a sexual assault exam. The Student Advocate or Title IX Coordinator will refer the victim to a hospital or community-based program that has a sexual assault nurse examiner (SANE) on staff. Once they present to the hospital or community-based program as a victim of sexual

assault, an advocate for a sexual assault survivors will arrive to assist them in receiving the necessary services. Training Slide #49 49 What must confidential employees report? Employees designated or licensed to maintain confidentiality must report only the type of incident reported to them They may not report information that would violate a students expectation of privacy, UNLESS The employee is required to report information under other law

The student consents to disclosure NOTE: Only a single report stating the type of incident is required when multiple confidential employees receive information about the same incident. Training Slide #50 50 What must Student Advocates report? Student Advocates may not disclose any communication made by a student UNLESS Disclosure is required by law The student consents to disclosure

Training Slide #51 51 What must Student Advocates report? Example: The university designated Trent as a Student Advocate. After the university announced Trent as one of the Student Advocates, a fellow student stopped Trent after class to discuss a concern. Trent set up a time to meet with a student during his Student Advocate hours. The student reported to Trent that she was sexually assaulted by a non-affiliated person off campus over the weekend. Should Trent report this matter? Trent can only disclose this matter to the Title IX Coordinator with the written consent of the student (victim/complainant). Student Advocates are confidential and can only disclose if a federal law requires them to do so.

Training Slide #52 52 Who is protected by confidentiality? An alleged victim of sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, or stalking A person who: Reports an incident of sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, or stalking Seeks guidance or support concerning an incident from the institution Participates in the investigation or adjudication of an incident Is alleged to have committed or assisted in the commission of an

incident of sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, or stalking Training Slide #53 53 What is protected by confidentiality? The identity of the person is confidential, unless waived in writing by the person. The identity Is not subject to disclosure under the Texas Public Information Act And may only be disclosed to: The postsecondary institution to conduct an investigation of the report Law enforcement to conduct a criminal investigation of the report, as appropriate A healthcare provider in an emergency situation as determined by the institution

NOTE: For cases in which an investigation is deemed necessary, the identities of the parties and witnesses will be disclosed to the parties and witnesses, as necessary. Training Slide #54 54 Victim Rights Training Slide #55 55 Victim Request Not to Investigate

A victim may request that the institution not investigate the reported incident. The institution may choose whether or not to honor the request not to investigate after considering: Seriousness of the allegation Existence of other reports Risk of harm to others Any other relevant factors Training Slide #56

56 Victim Request Not to Investigate The institution must tell the victim the outcome of the decision regarding whether to investigate. If the institution decides to investigate, it must comply with the confidentiality requirements under applicable federal and state law. If the institution does not investigate, it must take the reasonable steps it determines are necessary, consistent with the law and institutional policy, to protect the health and safety of the community in relation to the alleged incident. Training Slide #57

57 Consequences for Failure to Report or False Reporting Training Slide #58 58 Employment Consequences Mandatory Termination A postsecondary educational institution shall terminate the employment of an employee whom the institution determines in

accordance with the institution's disciplinary procedure to have committed an offense [of failure to report]. Training Slide #59 59 Employment Consequences What is required of the institution? Conduct an investigation through the schools faculty/staff disciplinary process to determine whether the employee committed the offense of failure to report.

If it is determined that the employee did in fact commit this offense, termination is required. Training Slide #60 60 Criminal Penalties In addition, it is a: Class B misdemeanor (punishable by a maximum of 180 days in jail and/or a maximum fine of $2,000) for a person who is required to make a report under Section 51.252 and knowingly fails to make the report or with the intent to harm or deceive, knowingly makes a

report . . . that is false. The offense is escalated to a Class A misdemeanor (punishable by up to one year in jail and/or a maximum fine of $4,000) if it is shown on the trial of the offense that the actor intended to conceal the incident. Training Slide #61 61 Retaliation Training Slide #62 62

Retaliation Victims & Respondents A postsecondary educational institution shall take reasonable steps to ensure: Victims of sexual harassment, stalking, sexual assault, and/or dating violence receive interim measures that protect against retaliation The victim and respondent are protected from retaliation and harassment during the disciplinary process Training Slide #63 63 Retaliation Victims & Respondents

Example: The day before the hearing in a stalking case, the Title IX Coordinator learned that friends of the victim sent the respondent harassing messages and followed the respondent around campus. The Title IX Coordinator must act to stop the harassment of the respondent during the disciplinary process. Training Slide #64 64 Retaliation Witnesses & Reporters A postsecondary educational institution may not discipline or discriminate against an employee or student who in good faith:

Reports an incident of sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, or stalking Cooperates with the investigation, disciplinary process, or judicial proceeding related to the report This provision does not include a person who perpetrated or assisted in the perpetration of an act of sexual harassment, stalking, dating violence, or sexual assault. Training Slide #65 65 Retaliation Witnesses & Reporters A person acting in good faith who reports or cooperates in an investigation: Is immune from civil liability, and from criminal

liability for offenses punishable by fine only, that might otherwise be incurred or imposed as a result of those actions Training Slide #66 66 Retaliation Witnesses & Reporters Example: An employee overheard a discussion between two coworkers. The employee reported the matter to the Title IX Coordinator believing the discussion constituted sexual harassment. After an investigation, the Title IX Coordinator determined that the incident did not constitute sexual harassment.

The employee reported the matter in good faith and should not be disciplined for making a report. Training Slide #67 67 Remedies, Interim Measures, and Support Services for All Parties Training Slide #68 68 Remedies, Interim Measures, and Support Services for All Parties

In responding to reports, the institution must: Provide interim and supportive measures to protect victims during the process Implement measures to protect both parties from retaliation Offer each party counseling by an individual who does not provide counseling to any other person involved in the incident, to the greatest extent practicable Permit either party to drop a course in which both parties are enrolled without an academic penalty The institution may also provide interim measures and other support services to the accused party, witnesses, and other participants, consistent with its policy. Title IX and the Clery Act impose additional requirements. Training Slide #69

69 Administrative Reporting Requirements Training Slide #70 70 Overview Reporting Requirements in the Tex. Edu. Code 51.253 1. Title IX Coordinator (TIXC) Report Requirement 2. Imminent Danger Reporting Requirement 3. Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Report Requirement

CEO reporting exceptions Additional clarifications and guidance for institutions? Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) recommended templates (Report Templates) in the Training Appendix Supplemental training on the Report Templates in the Training Appendix Supplemental reference on Title IX Coordinator Sexual Misconduct Policy Checklist in the Training Appendix Training Slide #71 71 Administrative Reporting Requirements Who does this apply to? Postsecondary educational institutions, which means an

institution of higher education or a private or independent institution of higher education: o "Institution of higher education" means any public technical institute, public junior college, public senior college or university, medical or dental unit, public state college, or other agency of higher education, including Systems of higher education. o Private or independent institution of higher education includes private or independent colleges or universities. Training Slide #72 72 1. Title IX Coordinator Report

Training Slide #73 73 Title IX Coordinator Report: Introduction The institutions Title IX Coordinator (TIXC) is responsible for submitting a written report to the institutions Chief Executive Officer (e.g., President of the institution) at least once every three months; effective January 1, 2020. The THECB will make available a recommended template to the institutions for the Title IX Coordinator Report, which will satisfy the reporting requirements of this section for the THECB. Using the report template is not required. Training Slide #74

74 Required Information in the TIXC Report 1. Information on the investigation of the reports received by employees (as required in Sect. 3.5) on sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, or stalking (as defined in Sect. 3.3); 2. Information on the disposition (if any) of any disciplinary processes arising from those reports; and

3. Information on the reports for which the institution determined not to initiate a disciplinary process (if any). Training Slide #75 75 TIXC Report: Clarifications Disposition (for the purposes of this section) means the final result under the institutions disciplinary process. When identifiable, reports may exclude duplicate reports

of a single alleged incident. Reports may separately specify the number of confidential reports received by confidential employees, who are only required to report type of incident to the TIXC or Deputy TIXC. Training Slide #76 76 2. Imminent Danger Reporting Training Slide #77 77

Imminent Danger Reporting: Introduction The institutions Title IX Coordinator (TIXC) or Deputy TIXC is responsible for immediately reporting to the institutions Chief Executive Officer (e.g., President of the institution) an incident reported by an employee, if the TIXC has cause to believe that the safety of any person is in imminent danger as a result of the incident. This reporting requirement of the TIXC or Deputy TIXC is effective January 1, 2020. Training Slide #78 78 Imminent Danger: Reporting Guidance

Institutions may consider establishing the criteria for determining a cause to believe that the safety of any person is in imminent danger as a result of the incident. Institutions can determine the process and procedures for how the TIXC or Deputy TIXC will report to the CEO of imminent danger notifications, and the type of information that will be included in the notifications. Once determined by the institution, the institution should consider documenting the notification process with the TIXC and keeping written records of the imminent danger notifications for the TIXC record keeping purposes. Training Slide #79 79

3. Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Report Training Slide #80 80 CEO Report: Introduction The institutions Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is responsible for: 1. Submitting a summary report (CEO Report) to the institutions governing body (e.g., Board of Regents, Board of Trustees) at least once annually, during either the fall or spring semester; and 2. Posting the summary report (CEO Report) on the institutions website at least once annually, during either the fall or spring semester; both effective January 1, 2020.

The THECB will make available a recommended template to the institutions for the CEO Report, which will satisfy the reporting requirements of this section for the THECB. Using the report template is not required. Training Slide #81 81 CEO Report: Exception If for any semester an institution has fewer than 1,500 enrolled students, the CEO must submit and post a summary report for that semester only if more than five (5) reports were received.

If an institution meets this exception criteria in a semester: The institution should still consider communicating to the institutions governing body that the exception criteria was met and posting on the institutions website that the exception criteria was met, and therefore, explained publicly on the institutions website. Training Slide #82 82 Required Information in the CEO Report 1. The number of reports received by employees on sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, or stalking;

2. The number of investigations conducted as a result of those reports; 3. The disposition (if any) of any disciplinary processes arising from those reports; Training Slide #83 4. The number of those reports for which the institution determined not to initiate a disciplinary process (if any); 5. Any disciplinary actions

taken. *The CEO Report may not identify any person (associated with the reports received by an employee) 83 CEO Report: Clarifications Disposition (for the purposes of this section) means the final result under the institutions disciplinary process. When identifiable, reports may exclude duplicate reports of a single alleged incident. Reports may separately specify the number of confidential reports received by employees, who are

only required to report type of incident to the TIXC or Deputy TIXC. Training Slide #84 84 Posting the CEOs Summary Report (CEO Report) on the Institutions Website The CEO Report Template is written purposefully so that an institution could publish the summary report (CEO Report) in its entirety on an annual basis, including the memo introduction, the summary data report, and the included footnotes in the CEO Report to ensure the full context of the summary data is explained publicly on the institutions website.

The CEO must post the summary report (CEO Report) on the institutions website at least once annually, during either the fall or spring semester by October of each year, in order to certify in writing that the institution is in substantial compliance. Training Slide #85 85 Posting the Exception on the Institutions Website As stated previously: If for any semester an institution has fewer than 1,500 enrolled students, the CEO shall submit and post a summary report for that semester only if more than five (5) reports were received. If an institution meets this exception criteria in a

semester: The institution should still consider communicating to the institutions governing body that the exception criteria was met and posting on the institutions website that the exception criteria was met, and therefore, explain publicly on the institutions website. Training Slide #86 86 CEO Certification to the THECB As referenced in the rules for Compliance: The institutions Chief Executive Officer (CEO) must annually certify in writing to the Texas Higher Education Coordaining Board (THECB), in October of each year, that the institution is in substantial compliance with the

statute. Training Slide #87 87 CEO Certification to the THECB (continued) In order for the institutions CEO to certify substantial compliance: 1. The CEO must have already submitted a summary report (CEO Report) to the institutions governing body (e.g., Board of Regents, Board of Trustees) at least once annually, during either the fall or spring semester; and 2. The CEO must have already posted the summary report (CEO

Report) on the institutions website at least once annually, during either the fall or spring semester. Training Slide #88 88 Questions or clarifications needed on the Administrative Reporting Requirements? Contact the THECB: Cathie A. Maeyaert, J.D. Director for Private Postsecondary Institutions Title IX Coordinator for Higher Education Institutions Direct Phone: (512) 427-6527 Email: [email protected]

Training Slide #89 89 Disciplinary Process Training Slide #90 90 Student Rights During the Disciplinary Process Both the student alleged to have

violated the policy and the alleged victim must be afforded the following rights throughout the disciplinary process: Number One A prompt and equitable opportunity to present witnesses and other evidence relevant to the alleged violation during the process Number Two Equitable access to all evidence relevant to the

alleged violation in the institution's possession Number Three Protection from retaliation and harassment as deemed reasonable during the pending disciplinary process Training Slide #91 91 Withdrawal or Graduation Training Slide #92 92

Respondent Withdrawal or Graduation If a student withdraws or graduates from a postsecondary educational institution pending a disciplinary charge alleging that the student violated the institution's code of conduct by committing sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, or stalking, the institution: (1) May not end the disciplinary process or issue a transcript to the student until the institution makes a final determination of responsibility; and (2) Shall expedite the institution's disciplinary process as necessary to accommodate both the student's and the alleged victim's interest in a speedy resolution. Training Slide #93

93 Other Institutional Duties Training Slide #94 94 Sharing Information with Other Institutions On request by another postsecondary educational institution, a postsecondary educational institution shall provide to the requesting institution information relating to a determination by the institution that a student enrolled at the institution violated the institution's code of conduct by committing sexual harassment, sexual

assault, dating violence, or stalking as permitted by state or federal law. Training Slide #95 95 Trauma Informed Investigation Training Each peace officer employed by a postsecondary educational institution shall complete training on traumainformed investigation into allegations of sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking. Training Slide #96 96

Memoranda of Understanding All postsecondary educational institutions shall enter into a memorandum of understanding with one or more: (1) local law enforcement agencies; (2) sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, or stalking advocacy groups; or (3) hospitals or other medical resource providers. Training Slide #97 97 Annual Certification The Chief Executive Officer must certify in writing to the

THECB, each October, as follows: That the institution is in substantial compliance with Texas Education Code Subchapter E-2 (Sections 51.251-51.260) Reminder: Substantial Compliance means a postsecondary educational institution has made a good faith effort to comply with the requirements under these rules provided that the deficiencies identified by the THECB can be readily corrected. The following template (hyperlink) must be used for this certification. Training Slide #98 98 Non-Compliance

If the THECB finds that an institution is not in substantial compliance with Texas Education Code (Subchapters E-2 on or after January 1, 2020, and E3 on or after August 1, 2020): The THECB may assess an administrative penalty against the institution in an amount not to exceed $2 million. Note: If such a finding is made, the THECB shall consider the nature of the violation and the number of students enrolled at the institution in determining the amount of the penalty. The THECB will provide State Officials with a report that identifies institutions found not to be in substantial compliance and summarizes any penalties assessed during the calendar year preceding the date of the report. Training Slide #99 99

Administrative Penalty Assessment If the THECB assesses an administrative penalty against an institution, the following will occur: The THECB will provide the institution with written notice of the THECBs reasons for assessing the penalty; and The institution may appeal the penalty. Note: An institution cannot pay the administrative penalty using state or federal money. The THECB will deposit any administrative penalty collected to the credit of a sexual assault program fund. Training Slide #100 100

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