Positive - nepbis.org

Positive - nepbis.org

Creating a Positive and Proactive Classroom to Support ALL Learners Brandi Simonsen, Ph.D. Workshop Overview Mon Class-wide Antecedent and Teaching Behavior Strategies (9:30-12:30) Maximizing Structure, Classroom Expectations, & Active Engagement Class-wide Consequence Strategies Tue Appropriate and Responding to Inappropriate (9:30-12:30) Acknowledging Behavior Wed Positive and Proactive Supports for ALL and Action Planning (9:45-12:30) Applying Knowledge of Strategies to An Individual Classroom Thurs Developing Systems to Support Class-wide Support (8:45-10:00, Taking your knowledge to scale (from one classroom to all 10:30-12:30) classrooms) Advance Organizer: Day 4 8:45-9:30 9:30-10:30 10:00-10:30

11:00-11:45 11:45-12:30 12:15-12:30 Overview of the day & Brief Review Lecture & Discussion: Systems to Support Implementation Review Systems Brief BREAK (Check-Out) Lecture & Discussion: Example of Supporting Discuss One Example of Supporting Teachers Table Activity: Jigsaw Brainstorm systems features required to take practices to scale within your school and district Wrap-Up Discuss systems features as a large group Review strand content Developing Systems to Support Teachers Implementation of Positive and Proactive PCBS Practices Lets get started! As a result of attending todays training, you will be able to Describe the need for supporting teachers

implementation of of positive classroom behavior support (PCBS) practices Develop systems to support teachers implementation of PCBS practices Discuss a multi-tiered framework of professional development support for teachers; and Identify promising, efficient, and effective support strategies for teachers PCBS practices. Before we talk specifically about systems, What is implementation? Implementation is specified set of activities designed to put into practice an activity or program of known dimensions (Fixsen, Naoom, Blas, Friedman, & Wallace, 2005, p. 5) Its what we do. Implementation outcomes include changes in adult professional behavior organizational structures and culturesto support the changes in adult professional behavior relationships to consumers, stakeholders, and systems partners (Fixsen et al., 2005, p. 12) Isnt there science to guide implementation? Translated into our language (based on theirs) Begin with an it (evidence-based practice [EBP] or

program; aka source or best example) Identify the who (individuals who work to implement with fidelity; aka purveyors) Identify the where (individuals and organizations that will adopt the EBP; aka destination) Determine how: train, prompt, and use data (performance feedback; aka feedback mechanism or information flow) Consider context (aka influence) (Fixsen, Naoom, Blas, Friedman, & Wallace, 2005, p.12) Isnt there science to guide implementation? New Old Way Where: Teacher / Classroom It: EBP Context Who: Implementation Supporters

How: Train, prompt, use data (Fixsen, Naoom, Blas, Friedman, & Wallace, 2005, p.12) Returning to the Adapted Conceptual Model for Implementation It: EBP Where: Teacher / Classroom Who: Implementation Supporters How: Train, prompt, use data Context

(Adapted from Fixsen, Naoom, Blas, Friedman, & Wallace, 2005, p.12) We know a bit about whats likely to work: Evidence-based practices in classroom management 1. Maximize structure in your classroom. 2. Post, teach, review, monitor, and reinforce a small number of positively stated expectations. 3. Actively engage students in observable ways. 4. Establish a continuum of strategies to acknowledge appropriate behavior. 5.

Establish a continuum of strategies to respond to inappropriate behavior. So we know what theBriesch, it is. Myers, & Sugai, (Simonsen, Fairbanks, Waitwhy arent we doing it? What do we know from the empirical literature? Teachers typically receive little pre- or in-service training in classroom management (Begeny & Martens, 2006; Freeman, Simonsen, Briere, & MacSuga, in press; Markow, Moessner, & Horowitz, 2006; Special Education Elementary Longitudinal Study, 2001, 2002, 2004; Wei, Darling-Hammond, & Adomson, 2010) Multi-component training packages (didactic training + coaching + performance feedback + etc.) result in desired behavior change, especially when trained skills are effective (Abbott et al., 1998; Hiralall & Martens, 1998; Madsen, Becker, & Thomas, 1968; Simonsen,

& So, we may know the it,MacSuga-Gage, but we need toBriere, figure Freeman, out the who Sugai, in preparation; The Metropolitan Child Study supports). (implementation supporters) and how Area (implementation Research Group & Gorman-Smith, 2003; Rollins et al., 1974) Take Away Messages Bottom line: training by itself does not result in positive implementation or intervention outcomes Unfortunately, most teachers receive sit and get training (at best) in classroom and behavior support We need to consider lessons learned and develop systems to support teachers

implementation. (Fixsen, Naoom, Blas, Friedman, & Wallace, 2005, pp. 40-41; National Joint Committee on Learning Disabilities, 2000; Wei et al., 2010) Lets Dive into Systems! As a result of attending todays training, you will be able to Describe the need for supporting teachers implementation of of positive classroom behavior support (PCBS) practices Develop systems to support teachers implementation of PCBS practices Discuss a multi-tiered framework of professional development support for teachers; and Identify promising, efficient, and effective support strategies for teachers PCBS practices. Acknowledgements for this Section (Co-authors of PBIS Technical Brief on Systems to Support Teachers Implementation of Positive Classroom Behavior Support): Jennifer Freeman

Brandi Simonsen Steve Goodman Barbara Mitchell Heather George Jessica Swain-Bradway Kathleen Lane Jeff Sprague Bob Putnam S M E T S Y S N O F

S E R I E R E H B V C I L A T I A E S C T I T O N R

T P H O R F C P O O E P P T U P N S S U O I I S PB TO ENTAT AVIOR

H M E E B L P M O IM O R S S A L C H yp er lin k Guiding Questions

Tables with Details School-Level Scenario PCBS Systems Action Planning Guide: 3 Key Questions Are the foundational systems in place to support PCBS practice implementation by all staff? Do all staff know what PCBS practices to implement and if theyre doing it accurately? Do data indicate that staff are implementing PCBS practices effectively? PCBS Systems Action Planning Guide: 3 Key Questions Are the foundational systems in place to support PCBS practice implementation by all staff? Do all staff know what PCBS practices to implement and if theyre doing it accurately? Do data indicate that staff are implementing PCBS practices

effectively? Are the foundational systems in place to support PCBS practice implementation by all staff? PCPS implementation is a clear school and district priority Examples: District and school administrators have communicated a clear priority for PCBS implementation. Non-Examples: No practices are prioritized for implementation, identified strategies lack evidence of effectiveness, and/or priority practices are not effectively disseminated among all staff. Are the foundational systems in place to support PCBS practice implementation by all staff?

PCPS implementation is a clear school and district priority + School and district resources are available to support PCBS implementation Examples: Dedicated time for training Dedicated time for coaching functions Regular data review Celebration or recognition of staff implementation Non-Examples: No dedicated time or resources Data not shared or not used in problem solving Staff recognition not available or used to celebrate PCBS

implementation Are the foundational systems in place to support PCBS practice implementation by all staff? PCPS implementation is a clear school and district priority + School and district resources are available to support PCBS implementation Examples: Implementation of PCBS connected to clear need in building Implementation of PCBS connected to academic instruction PCBS strategies adapted to ensure classroom contextual and cultural fit

School and district teams have considered alignment and integration of PCBS with other district priorities and initiatives + Non-Examples: Data demonstrating need are not regularly shared Academic strategies taught in isolation Training on practices not connected to why it is important in the school PCBS Systems Action Planning Guide: 3 Key Questions Are the foundational systems in place to support PCBS practice implementation by all staff? Do all staff know what PCBS practices to implement and if theyre doing it accurately?

Do data indicate that staff are implementing PCBS practices effectively? Do all staff know what PCBS practices to implement and if theyre doing it accurately? Clear expectations and explicit training about practices that should be implemented by all staff. Examples: Clearly stated outcomes Explicit (model, lead, test) approach Job-embedded Linked to school data Delivered in various contexts and connected to practice Non-Examples: PD focuses only on theory and assumes educators will discover practices Full-day intensive training with no

follow-up Short trainings not connected to larger need, structure, etc. Do all staff know what PCBS practices to implement and if theyre doing it accurately? Clear expectations and explicit training about practices that should be implemented by all staff. Examples: Prompts and reminders Supportive data-based feedback Supports may be delivered by Coach/mentor Peer/peer team Self Coaching and/or regularly available performance feedback on the use of PCBS practices? +

Non-Examples: Data delivered in punitive evaluative fashion Feedback delayed or not databased Table 2. Coaching Internal or external coach or mentor Peer

Self School or district behavior coach sends regular reminders to staff of the critical features of PCBS strategies, conducts walk through observations of educators, and provides specific and supportive feedback. Mentors assigned to support educators provide reminders of the critical features of PCBS strategies, collect data on the use of each skill, and provide supportive data-based feedback. Professional Learning Communities established within grade level or department teams focus on strategies targeted for improvement; team members review critical features of targeted practice and provides

feedback and implementation support to each other. Pairs of educators work together reminding one another of the critical features of each skill, provide practice opportunities, and observational feedback. Educators commit to being a dedicated coach for at least one strategy and a dedicated learner of a new strategy. Educators are provided with explicit instruction in one or more specific classroom management strategies. Educators set a goal for improvement and are provided with a tool for data collection and evaluation. Educators self-reinforce when they meet their goal. Mentoring or coaching conversations are not focused on specific PCBS strategies or guided by data.

Data are not kept confidential but are shared with peers or administrators or used for evaluative purposes. Em Re Lack of structure for meetings (e.g., not using data to select targeted skills or guide conversations); lack of trust among members; focus becomes student-specific rather than educator skills focused. Em Re

Asking educators to self-manage without clearly understanding the targeted strategy or data collection component. Em Re PCBS Systems Action Planning Guide: 3 Key Questions Are the foundational systems in place to support PCBS practice implementation by all staff? Do all staff know what PCBS practices to implement and if theyre doing it accurately? Do data indicate that staff are implementing PCBS practices

effectively? Do data indicate that staff are implementing PCBS practices Are staff implementing PCBS with fidelity? effectively? Yes No Well done! Monitor outcomes and adjust as needed Determine the number of classrooms needing support (many or a few) Minor Major Review and adjust universal support

Many Determine type and severity of implementation changes (minor or major) Provide supplemental support to small groups of staff needing support Few Consider individualized supports and other strategies for staff members needing intensified support. What data do we use to drive decision making? TABLE 3. TOOLS FOR DATA COLLECTION Table 3. Data Tools

Data Collection Strategy What key strategies can I use to collect data on teacher PCBS implementation? Conditions and Examples Non Examples of Use Tools and Resources for Data Collection Method Under what conditions will this strategy be appropriate? Under what conditions will this strategy be inappropriate? What are some sample tools?

Self-Assessment Checklists Staff have received training on and can identify examples of each measured skill. Staff are unable to recognize or describe PCBS practices. Staff have not been trained in use of the checklist. Observer Checklists

Tools for Measuring DiscreteSkills or Strategies Prepare staff for visit; ensure opportunities for shared reflection and problem solving. Staff have received training on and can identify examples of each measured skill. Staff have set specific goals for improvement of targeted skills. Observations are used for evaluation

purposes or data is not shared back with staff. Data needed for decision making requires information on more than one or two discrete skills. Classroom management selfassessment MO SW-PBS Teacher SelfAssessment of the Effective Classroom Practices (2016) MO SW-PBS Teacher SelfAssessment of Effective Classroom

Practices Wisconsin Walk through tools Self-management training scripts and tools Data-collection applications o SCOA Multi-tiered Framework of Professional Development Support Progress Monitoring Walk-through, Student Data Review, Teacher Collected Data Universal Screening Walk-through & Student Data Review Tier 3 Intensive PD: Data-driven Consultation Tier 2 Targeted PD: Self-Management with Peer or Coaching Supports

Tier 1 Universal PD: Training & SelfManagement How can we approach intensifying our supports (adapted from Simonsen, MasSuga, Briere, Freeman, Myers, Scott, & Sugai, 2013) for educators implementing PCBS? TABLE 4. STRATEGIES TO INTENSIFY SUPPORTS Intensifying supports for educators See Systems Brief Universal Support Focus of supports (precision) Supplemental Support Individualized This category identifies Support

This category of broad support is provided universally to all educators to improve PCBS a more strategic approach of support that focuses on core factors that should be in place for effective implementation of PCBS This category of specialized supports considers the unique needs of educators in implementation of PCBS The school and/or district provides general guidance on PCBS. Small groups of educators

express interest in or indicate need for increased support. Individual educators are identified for specialized support. This support is matched to the need of the educator through functional assessment to determine if there is a skills deficit (educator does not have the requisite skills to implement PCBS) or performance deficit (educator has the skillset but does not consistently implement the PCBS). Ensure that there is administrative support for PCBS through visibility, policy, and priority. Performance

expectations Expectations are communicated to all staff to develop a school climate conducive to learning. Learning application opportunity Review of training content that was previously provided. Amount and frequency of the support Provide high quality training with professional learning community to support implementation. Support is provided by giving additional

information or professional development on PCBS and removal of barriers that may interfere (e.g., competing initiatives, access to training/coaching). Expectations are reiterated or re-visited with selected/some staff to further communicate the importunate of school climate for their classrooms (e.g., grade level). Additional opportunities to practice PCBS in a training setting with feedback from the trainer are provided. Increased opportunities for coaching as a followup to training are Removing barriers that may interfere with effective PCBS practices

(competing initiatives, access to training/coaching). Expectations are communicated specifically and clearly to individual teachers about the importance of developing effective classroom environments. Provide additional opportunity to provide practice of PCBS in actual classroom setting with guidance and feedback from a coach. Provide frequent individual coaching through coaching, video review of recorded Lets Discuss Some Examples As a result of attending todays training, you will be able to Describe the need for supporting teachers implementation of of positive classroom behavior support (PCBS) practices

Develop systems to support teachers implementation of PCBS practices Discuss a multi-tiered framework of professional development support for teachers; and Identify promising, efficient, and effective support strategies for teachers PCBS practices. Acknowledgements for this Session (in Alphabetical Order, with Publication Years): Don Briere (2013) Amy Briesch (2008)

Carla DeLuca (2010) Kate Dooley (under review, in preparation) Sarah Fairbanks (2008) Lindsey Fallon (2012) Jen Freeman (2013, in preparation) Lola Gordon (in preparation) Laura Kern (under review, in preparation) Ashley MacSuga-Gage (2012, 2013, in preparation) Eleanor Maddock (under review, in preparation) Diane Myers (2008, 2010, 2013, under review, in preparation) Terry Scott (2013) George Sugai (2008, 2012, 2013) This is one way to start organizing our implementation supports We know what these are! It: EBP Where: Teacher / Classroom

But Who:? Implementation Supporters Expert Peer We know where! How:? Train, prompt, use data Who How needs SelfContext often? On what? what? (Adapted from Fixsen, Naoom, Blas, Friedman, & Wallace, 2005, p.12) Multi-tiered Framework of Professional Development Support

EXAMPLES Progress Monitoring Walk-through, Student Data Review, Teacher Collected Data Universal Screening Walk-through & Student Data Review Tier 3 Intensive PD: Data-driven Consultation Tier 2 Targeted PD: SelfManagement with Peer or Coaching Supports Tier 1 Universal PD: Training & SelfManagement Self-management may be ONE way to approach this! (adapted from Simonsen, MasSuga, Briere, Freeman, Myers, Scott, & Sugai, 2013) Self Management: A promising component

of effective and efficient PD support Self-management: Individuals manage their own behavior in the same manner as they manage anyone elsesthrough the manipulation of variables of which behavior is a function (Skiner, 1953, p. 228). Self-manipulation of antecedents Engaging in other (self-management) behaviors to affect probability of target behaviors Self-monitoring and self-evaluation Self-manipulation of consequences (e.g., selfreinforcement) What does our initial research on self-management indicate? Across three studies, weve found that self-management with email coaching prompts resulted in desired initial increases in specific classroom management skills across teachers. We are still working to enhance maintenance and generalization of effects. (Simonsen, Freeman, Dooley, Maddock, & Kern, 2017) Teachers Set a goal (criterion for self-reinforcement) Self-monitored daily Entered data into an Excel Spreadsheet, which automatically graphed daily praise rates relative to goal Self-evaluated and self-reinforced

Received weekly email prompts to use specific praise and submit data Where can you find the materials? See classroom tab of nepbis.org for copies of the training scripts, email prompts, and spreadsheets weve developed for tracking praise, prompts, and opportunities to respond. Supporting Teachers with Targeted PD Implementing Targeted Professional Development (PD) Targeted PD may work as tier 1 or 2 PD support for teachers. May be facilitated by a school-based behavior coach, instructional coach, or other school leader with behavioral

expertise. Targeted PD Includes Brief didactic training (1:1 or group setting) Teacher/staff self-management: Daily self-monitoring during brief (15 min) sample of instruction Daily self-evaluation (entering data, determining if goal was met) Self-reinforcement (celebrating on days when goal is met) Weekly email reminders re: skill use and selfmanagement strategies (by behavior coach) Periodic (e.g., bi-weekly) fidelity monitoring of skill use and self-management (by behavior coach) Didactic Training Scripted training that provides: Definition of skill Rational for using the skill Examples/non-examples of the skill Activity to apply the skill in the natural context Definition of self-management Instruction in self-management (i.e., how to self-monitor, enter data, self-evaluate, and self-reinforce) See example for specific praise in your handout and previewed next.

Develop Self-management Plan See example for specific praise in your handout. Use Self-management Self-monitor Use spreadsheet to enter data and self-evaluate Self-reinforce See examples on classrooms tab at nepbis.org. Weekly Email Reminders Brief email reminders about praise and skill use. For example: Remember, specific praise is contingent (delivered immediately after the behavior), specific (names the desired behavior exhibited), and positive. Nice hand raise and Thank you for actively listening are examples of brief specific praise statements. Keep on counting, graphing, reviewing your data, and

reinforcing yourself when you meet your goal! Multi-tiered Framework of Professional Development Support EXAMPLES Progress Monitoring Walk-through, Student Data Review, Teacher Collected Data Universal Screening Walk-through & Student Data Review Tier 3 Intensive PD: Data-driven Consultation Tier 2 Targeted PD: SelfManagement with Peer or Coaching Supports Tier 1 Universal PD: Training & SelfManagement Coaching/Mentoring Self-management may maybe

beANOTHER ONE way way approach this! to to approach this! (adapted from Simonsen, MasSuga, Briere, Freeman, Myers, Scott, & Sugai, 2013) What about other approaches? Consultation approaches may provide intensive supports for new or in-service teachers. (Briere, Simonsen, Myers, & Sugai, 2015; MacSuga & Simonsen, 2011) Another Research Example Don Briere explored the effects of within-school consultation (self-monitoring + structured weekly meetings) on the specific praise rates of 3 new (induction) elementary school teachers Multi-tiered Framework of Professional Development Support EXAMPLES

Progress Monitoring Walk-through, Student Data Review, Teacher Collected Data Universal Screening Walk-through & Student Data Review Tier 3 Intensive PD: Data-driven Consultation Tier 2 Targeted PD: SelfManagement with Peer or Coaching Supports Tier 1 Universal PD: Training & SelfManagement Self-management, Peer Supports may and/or becoaching, ANOTHER way to mentoring approach may this! be

ways to approach this! (adapted from Simonsen, MasSuga, Briere, Freeman, Myers, Scott, & Sugai, 2013) In sum, this is one way to provide implementation supports We know what these are! It: EBP Where: Teacher / Classroom We know where! Who: How: Implementation Train, prompt, Supporters use data Who

Daily How Brief Context data Self needs Expert Weekly training often? On feedback email what? Peer what? prompts (Adapted from Fixsen, Naoom, Blas, Friedman, & Wallace, 2005, p.12) Multi-tiered Framework of Professional Development Support Progress Monitoring Walk-through, Student Data Review, Teacher Collected Data

Universal Screening Walk-through & Student Data Review Tier 3 Intensive PD: Data-driven Consultation Tier 2 Targeted PD: SelfManagement with Peer or Coaching Supports Tier 1 Universal PD: Training & SelfManagement We believe this approach (among others) may be best delivered (adapted from a Simonsen, MasSuga, Briere, Freeman, within multi-tiered framework for PD. Myers, Scott, & Key Take Away Messages Invest in systems to support

teachers implementation of PCBS practices. PD supports organized in a multi-tiered framework may facilitate teachers implementation of PBIS practices. Self-management may be a helpful PD support within a MTF Organizing Supports within an MTS Framework Supporting Social Competence & Academic Achievement 4 PBIS Elements TE M S SY S TA

DA Supporting Staff Behavior OUTCOMES PRACTICES Supporting Student Behavior Supporting Decision Making Supporting Social Competence & Academic Achievement What outcomes do you have for CWPBIS in your school? in your district? OUTCOMES What do these look

like across tiers 1, 2, and 3? Are these reflected in the action plan(s) for your school? for your district? Checklists Walk Through Self-Monitoring TA DA SWIS What data will you collect to (a) evaluate CWPBIS, (b) identify teachers who need support, and (c) progress monitor?

Supporting Decision Making Are these data reflected in the action plan(s) for your school? for your district? Direct Observation What does this look like across tiers 1, 2, and 3? 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Maximize structure in your classroom. Post, teach, review, monitor, and reinforce a small number of positively stated

expectations. Actively engage students in observable ways. Establish a continuum of strategies to acknowledge appropriate behavior. Establish a continuum of strategies to respond to inappropriate behavior. PRACTICES Supporting Student Behavior Supporting Staff Behavior SY S TE M S Traditional PD

Antecedent Prompts Changes Antecedent to Environ Self-Management Coaching/ Behavior Consultation Consequen ce Monitor Reinforce Behavior Consequen ce Correct

Secondary Screening: Unresponsive to Tier 2 or Challenges across X skills Universal Screening: Walkthrough, ODR data, CBM data Tier 3: Individualized Consultation Supports Tier 2: Self-Management (Self-Monitoring, Self Eval, Self SR+), Prompts, & Accountability Tier 1: Overview of Classroom Management Practices (Explicit Training) & Self-Monitoring 1. Maximize structure in your classroom. 2. Post, teach, review, monitor, and reinforce a small number of positively stated expectations. 3. Actively engage students in observable ways. 4. Establish a continuum of

strategies to acknowledge appropriate behavior. 5. Establish a continuum of strategies to respond to inappropriate behavior. (Simonsen, first use August 2011) Taking Practices to Scale: Discussion In addition to the strategies weve tried in research many schools have been busy trying to figure out how to Increase teachers use of classroom management skills Assess classroom management Support new teachers and teachers with significant challenges Lets discuss a few more examples, and then youll have time to jigsaw to identify additional strategies 61

Other examples Principal reviews 1 strategy per faculty meeting and gives grade-level (or content-specific) teams time to action plan around incorporating the strategy into their classrooms. Dean of Students has teachers read a book on classroom management (e.g., Geoff Colvins book) and provides explicit training on each strategy (with CEUs). School arranges peer mentors for all new or struggling teachers. Mentors model and then provide coaching and feedback. 62 Other examples A consultant teaches one strategy (e.g., praise) and asks teachers to self-monitor their use of that strategy during 1 instructional activity per day for 4 weeks. Teachers share praise rates in professional learning communities to support each others practice. PBS team members present content on classroom management (e.g., matrix, lesson plans, etc.). Then, they hold workshop drop in hourswhen teachers can come get assistance

with creating their products. 63 Wrap-up Recap: Evidence Based Practices in Classroom Management 1. Maximize structure in your classroom. 2. Post, teach, review, monitor, and reinforce a small number of positively stated expectations. 3. Actively engage students in observable ways. 4. Establish a continuum of strategies to acknowledge appropriate behavior.

5. Establish a continuum of strategies to respond to inappropriate behavior. (Simonsen, Fairbanks, Briesch, Myers, & Sugai, 2008) Decision-making Guide: 3 Key Questions Are the foundations of effective CPBIS in place? Effectively design the physical environment of the classroom + Develop & teach predictable classroom routines. + Post, define, & teach 3-5 positive classroom expectations. Are proactive and positive CPBIS practices implemented consistently?

Provide high rates of varied opportunities to respond. + Use prompts and active supervision. + Acknowledge behavior with specific praise & other strategies. Do data indicate that students are still engaging in problem behavior? Are students still engaging in problem behavior? Yes Are behaviors minor or major expectation violations? Minor

No Well done! Monitor outcomes and adjust as needed Major Use brief, specific How many students error & involved are (many Do correction data indicate thatare students still other strategies or few)? problem behavior? Many Review, adjust & intensify CWPBIS.

Ask for help! engaging in Few Request additional (tier 2 & 3) support for students. PCBS Systems Action Planning Guide: 3 Key Questions Are the foundational systems in place to support PCBS practice implementation by all staff? + School and district teams have considered alignment and integration of PCBS with other district priorities and initiatives +

School and district PCPS implementation Do all staff know what PCBS resources are is a clear school and available to support practices to implement and if district priority PCBS implementation theyre doing it accurately? Clear expectations and Coaching and/or regularly Do data about indicate that staffperformance are explicit

training available practices that should be feedback on the use of implementing PCBS implemented by all staff PCBS practices + practices effectively? Are staff implementing PCBS with fidelity? Yes No Well done! Monitor outcomes and adjust as needed

Determine the number of classrooms needing support (many or a few) Minor Major Review and adjust universal support Many Determine type and severity of implementation changes (minor or major) Few Provide supplemental Do data indicate that staff support to small implementing

PCBS groups of staff needing support practices effectively? Few Consider are individualized supports and other strategies for staff members needing intensified support. Remember Your Resources Supporting and Responding to Student Behavior PBIS Technical Brief on Systems to Support Teachers Implementation of Positive

Classroom Behavior Support Classroom Management Practice Checklists Action Plan Thank you! [email protected] www.pbis.org www.cber.org

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