P505: Programming Languages Lecture 1: Intro; Caml ...

P505: Programming Languages Lecture 1: Intro; Caml ...

CSEP505: Programming Languages Lecture 4: Untyped Lambda-Calculus, Formal Operational Semantics, Dan Grossman Autumn 2016 Where are we To talk about functions more precisely, we need to define them as carefully as we did IMPs constructs First try adding functions & local variables to IMP on the cheap It didnt work [see last week] Now back up and define a language with nothing but functions [started last week] And then encode everything else Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman

2 Review Cannot properly model local scope via a global heap of integers Functions are not syntactic sugar for assignments to globals So lets build a model of this key concept Or just borrow one from 1930s logic And for now, drop mutation, conditionals, and loops We wont need them! The Lambda calculus in BNF Expressions: e ::= x | x. e | e e Values: v ::= x. e Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman

3 Thats all of it! [More review] Expressions: e ::= x | x. e | e e Values: v ::= x. e A program is an e. To call a function: substitute the argument for the bound variable Thats the key operation we were missing Example substitutions: (x. x) (y. y) y. y (x. y. y x) (z. z) y. y (z. z) (x. x x) (x. x x) Lecture 4 (x. x x) (x. x x) CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman

4 Why substitution [More review] After substitution, the bound variable is gone So clearly its name didnt matter That was our problem before Given substitution we can define a little programming language (correct & precise definition is subtle; well come back to it) This microscopic PL turns out to be Turing-complete Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 5 Full large-step interpreter type exp = Var of string

| Lam of string*exp | Apply of exp * exp exception BadExp let subst e1_with e2_for x = (*to be discussed*) let rec interp_large e = match e with Var _ -> raise BadExp(* unbound variable *) | Lam _ -> e (* functions are values *) | Apply(e1,e2) -> let v1 = interp_large e1 in let v2 = interp_large e2 in match v1 with Lam(x,e3) -> interp_large (subst e3 v2 x) | _ -> failwith "impossible" (* why? *) Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 6

Interpreter summarized Evaluation produces a value Lam(x,e3) if it terminates Evaluate application (call) by 1. Evaluate left 2. Evaluate right 3. Substitute result of (2) in body of result of (1) 4. Evaluate result of (3) A different semantics has a different evaluation strategy: 5. Evaluate left 6. Substitute right in body of result of (1) 7. Evaluate result of (2)

Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 7 Another interpreter type exp = Var of string | Lam of string*exp | Apply of exp * exp exception BadExp let subst e1_with e2_for x = (*to be discussed*) let rec interp_large2 e = match e with Var _ -> raise BadExp(*unbound variable*) | Lam _ -> e (*functions are values*) | Apply(e1,e2) -> let v1 = interp_large2 e1 in (* we used to evaluate e2 to v2 here *)

match v1 with Lam(x,e3) -> interp_large2 (subst e3 e2 x) | _ -> failwith "impossible" (* why? *) Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 8 What have we done Syntax and two large-step semantics for the lambda calculus First was call by value Second was call by name untyped Real implementations dont use substitution They do something equivalent

Amazing (?) fact: If call-by-value terminates, then call-by-name terminates (They might both not terminate) Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 9 What will we do Go back to math metalanguage Notes on concrete syntax (relates to OCaml) Define semantics with inference rules Lambda encodings (show our language is mighty) Define substitution precisely Environments Next time?? Small-step

Play with continuations (very fancy language feature) Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 10 Syntax notes When in doubt, put in parentheses Math (and OCaml) resolve ambiguities as follows: 1. x. e1 e2 is (x. e1 e2) not (x. e1) e2

General rule: Function body starts at the dot and ends at the first unmatched right paren Example: (x. y (z. z) w) q Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 11 Syntax notes 2. e1 e2 e3 is (e1 e2) e3 not e1 (e2 e3) General rule: Application associates to the left So e1 e2 e3 e4 is (((e1 e2) e3) e4) Lecture 4

CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 12 Its just syntax As in IMP, we really care about abstract syntax Here, internal tree nodes labeled or apply (i.e., call) Previous 2 rules just reduce parens when writing trees as strings Rules may seem strange, but theyre the most convenient Based on 70 years experience Especially with currying Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 13 What will we do

Go back to math metalanguage Notes on concrete syntax (relates to OCaml) Define semantics with inference rules Lambda encodings (show our language is mighty) Define substitution precisely Environments Next time?? Small-step Play with continuations (very fancy language feature) Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 14 Inference rules A metalanguage for operational semantics

Plus: more concise (& readable?) than OCaml Plus: useful for reading research papers Plus: natural support for nondeterminism Definition allowing observably different implementations Minus: less tool support than OCaml (no compiler) Minus: one more thing to learn Minus: painful in Powerpoint Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 15 Informal idea Want to know: what values (0, 1, many?) an expression can evaluate to So define a relation over pairs (e,v): Where e is an expression and v is a value

Just a subset of all pairs of expressions and values If the language is deterministic, this relation turns out to be a function from expressions to values Metalanguage supports defining relations Then prove a relation is a function (if it is) Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 16 Making up metasyntax Rather than write (e,v), well write e v. Its just metasyntax (!) Could use interp(e,v) or v e if you prefer Our metasyntax follows PL convention Colors are not conventional (slides: green = metasyntax) And distinguish it from other relations

First step: define the form (arity and metasyntax) of your relation(s): ev This is called a judgment Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 17 What we need to define So we can write e v for any e and v But we want such a thing to be true to mean e can evaluate to v and false to mean it cannot Examples (before the definition): (x. y. y x) ((z. z) (z. z)) y. y (z. z) in the relation (x. y. y x) ((z. z) (z. z)) z. z not in the relation y. y y. y in the relation (y. y) (x. y. y x) y. y not in the relation

(x. x x) (x. x x) y. y not in the relation (x. x x) (x. x x) (x. x x) (x. x x) metasyntactically bogus Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 18 Inference rules ev e{v/ x} = e [lam] x. e x. e e1 x. e3 e2 v2 e3{v2/x} = e4 e4 v [app] e1 e2 v

Using definition of a set of 4-tuples for substitution (exp * value * variable * exp) Will define substitution later Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 19 Inference rules ev e{v/x} = e [lam] x. e x. e e1 x. e3 e2 v2 e3{v2/x} = e4 e4 v

[app] e1 e2 v Rule top: hypotheses (0 or more) Rule bottom: conclusion Metasemantics: If all hypotheses hold, then conclusion holds Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 20 Rule schemas e1 x. e3 e2 v2 e3{v2/x} = e4 e4 v [app] e1 e2 v Each rule is a schema you instantiate consistently So [app] works for all x, e1, e2, e3, e4, v2, and v But each e1 has to be the same expression

Replace metavariables with appropriate terms Deep connection to logic programming (e.g., Prolog) Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 21 Instantiating rules [lam] x. e x. e Two example legitimate instantiations: z. z z. z x instantiated with z, e instantiated with z z. y. y z z. y. y z x instantiated with z, e instantiated with y. y z Two example illegitimate instantiations: z. z y. z

z. y. y z z. z. Z Must get your rules just right so you dont allow too much or too little Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 22 Derivations Tuple is in the relation if there exists a derivation of it An upside-down (or not?!) tree where each node is an instantiation and leaves are axioms (no hypotheses) To show e v for some e and v, give a derivation But we rarely hand-evaluate like this Were just defining a semantics remember Lets work through an example derivation for (x. y. y x) ((z. z) (z. z)) y. y (z. z)

Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 23 Which relation? So exactly which relation did we define The pairs at the bottom of finite-height derivations Note: A derivation tree is like the tree of calls in a large-step interpreter [when relation is a function] Rule being instantiated is branch of the match-expression Instantiation is arguments/results of the recursive call Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman

24 A couple extremes This rules are a bad idea because either one adds all pairs to the relation e1 v1 e v e v This rule is pointless because it adds no pairs to the relation e v e v Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman

25 Summary so far Define judgment via a collection of inference rules Tuple in the relation (judgment holds) if a derivation (tree of instantiations ending in axioms) exists As an interpreter, could be nondeterministic: Multiple derivations, maybe multiple v such that e v Our example language is deterministic In fact, syntax directed (1 rule per syntax form) Still need rules for e{v/x}=e Lets do more judgments (i.e., languages) to get the hang of it Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 26

Call-by-name large-step e N v e{v/x} = e [lam] x. e N x. e e1 N x. e3 e3{e2/x} = e4 e4 N v [app] e1 e2 N v Easier to see the difference than in OCaml Formal statement of amazing fact: For all e, if there exists a v such that e v then there exists a v2 such that e N v2 (Proof is non-trivial & must reason about substitution) Lecture 4

CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 27 IMP Two judgments H;e i and H;s H2 Assume get(H,x,i) and set(H,x,i,H2) are defined Lets try writing out inference rules for the judgments Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 28 What will we do Go back to math metalanguage Notes on concrete syntax (relates to OCaml)

Define semantics with inference rules Lambda encodings (show our language is mighty) Define substitution precisely Environments Next time?? Small-step Play with continuations (very fancy language feature) Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 29 Encoding motivation Fairly crazy: we left out integers, conditionals, data structures, Turns out were Turing complete We can encode whatever we need (Just like assembly language can)

Motivation for encodings Fun and mind-expanding Shows we are not oversimplifying the model (numbers are syntactic sugar) Can show languages are too expressive Example: C++ template instantiation Encodings are also just (re)definition via translation Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 30 Encoding booleans The Boolean Abstract Data Type (ADT) There are 2 booleans and 1 conditional expression The conditional takes 3 (curried) arguments If 1st argument is one bool, return 2nd argument If 1st argument is other bool, return 3rd argument

Any set of 3 expressions meeting this specification proper encoding of booleans is a Here is one (of many): true x. y. x false x. y. y if b. t. f. b t f Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 31 Example Given our encoding: true x. y. x

false x. y. y if b. t. f. b t f We can derive if true v1 v2 v1 And every law of booleans works out And every non-law does not By the way, this is OOP Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 32 But Evaluation order matters! With , our if is not YFLs if if true (x.x) (x. x x) (x. x x) doesnt terminate but

if true (x.x) (z. (x. x x) (x. x x) z) terminates Such thunking is unnecessary using N Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 33 Encoding pairs The Pair ADT There is 1 constructor and 2 selectors 1st selector returns 1st argument passed to the constructor 2nd selector returns 2nd argument passed to the constructor This does the trick: make_pair x. y. z. z x y first p. p (x. y. x) second

p. p (x. y. y) Example: snd (fst (make_pair (make_pair v1 v2) v3)) v2 Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 34 Reusing Lambda Is it weird that the encodings of Booleans and pairs both used (x. y. x) and(x. y. y) for different purposes? Is it weird that the same bit-pattern in binary code can represent an int, a float, an instruction, or a pointer? Von Neumann: Bits can represent (all) code and data Church (?): Lambdas can represent (all) code and data Beware the Turing tarpit

Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 35 Encoding lists Why start from scratch? Can build on bools and pairs: empty-list cons is-empty head tail

is make_pair false false is h.t.make_pair true make_pair h t is is is Note: Not too far from how lists are implemented Taking tail (tail empty) will produce some lambda Just like, without page-protection hardware , null->tail->tail would produce some bit-pattern Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 36 Encoding natural numbers

Known as Church numerals Will skip in the interest of time The natural number ADT is basically: zero successor (the add-one function) plus is-equal Encoding is correct if is-equal agrees with elementary-school arithmetic [Dont need full recursion, but with full recursion, can also just do lists of Booleans] Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 37 Recursion Can we write useful loops? Yes!

To write a recursive function: Write a function that takes an f and call f in place of recursion: Example (in enriched language): f.x.if x=0 then 1 else (x * f(x-1)) Then apply fix to it to get a recursive function fix f.x.if x=0 then 1 else (x * f(x-1)) Details, especially in CBV are icky; but its possible and need be done only once. For the curious: fix is f.(x.f (y. x x y))(x.f (y. x x y)) Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 38 More on fix fix is also known as the Y-combinator The informal idea:

fix(f.e) becomes something like e{(fix (f.e)) / f} Thats unrolling the recursion once Further unrollings are delayed (happen as necessary) Teaser: Most type systems disallow fix So later well add it as a primitive Example: OCaml can never type-check (x x) Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 39 What will we do Go back to math metalanguage Notes on concrete syntax (relates to OCaml) Define semantics with inference rules Lambda encodings (show our language is mighty)

Define substitution precisely Environments Next time?? Small-step Play with continuations (very fancy language feature) Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 40 Our goal Need to define e1{e2/x} = e3 Used in [app] rule Informally, replace occurrences of x in e1 with e2

Shockingly subtle to get right (in theory or programming) (Under call-by-value, only need e2 to be a value, but that doesnt make it much easier, so define the more general thing.) Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 41 Try #1[WRONG] e1{e2/x} = e3 x{e/x} = e y != x y{e/x} = y

e1{e2/x} = e3 (y.e1){e2/x} = y.e3 ea{e2/x} = ea eb{e2/x} = eb (ea eb) {e2/x} = ea eb Recursively replace every x leaf with e2 But the rule for substituting into (nested) functions is wrong: If the functions argument binds the same variable (shadowing), we should not change the functions body Example program: (x.x.x) 42 Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 42

Try #2 [WRONG] e1{e2/x} = e3 x{e/x} = e y != x y{e/x} = y e1{e2/x} = e3 y!=x (y.e1){e2/x} = y.e3 ea{e2/x} = ea eb{e2/x} = eb (ea eb) {e2/x} = ea eb

(x.e1){e2/x} = x.e1 Recursively replace every x leaf with e2, but respect shadowing Still wrong due to capture [actual technical term]: Example: (y.e1){y/x} Example (y.e1){(z.y/x} In general, if y appears free in e2 Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 43 More on capture Good news: capture cant happen under CBV or CBN If program starts with no unbound (free) variables Bad news: Can still result from inlining Bad news: Its still the wrong definition in general

My experience: The nastiest of bugs in language tools Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 44 Try #3 [Almost Correct] First define an expressions free variables (braces here are set notation) FV(x) = {x} FV(e1 e2) = FV(e1) U FV(e2) FV(y.e) = FV(e) {y} Now require no capture: e1{e2/x} = e3 y!=x y not in FV(e2) (y.e1){e2/x} = y.e3

Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 45 Try #3 in Full e1{e2/x} = e3 x{e/x} = e y != x y{e/x} = y e1{e2/x} = e3 y!=x y not in FV(e2) (y.e1){e2/x} = y.e3

ea{e2/x} = ea eb{e2/x} = eb (ea eb) {e2/x} = ea eb (x.e1){e2/x} = x.e1 No mistakes with what is here but only a partial definition What if y is in the free-variables of e2 Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 46 Implicit renaming

e1{e2/x} = e3 y!=x y not in FV(e2) (y.e1){e2/x} = y.e3 But this is a partial definition due to a syntactic accident, until We allow implicit, systematic renaming of any term In general, we never distinguish terms that differ only in variable names A key language-design principle Actual variable choices just as ignored as parens Means rule above can always apply with a lambda Called alpha-equivalence: terms differing only in names of variables are the same term Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 47 Try #4 [correct]

[Includes systematic renaming and drops an unneeded rule] e1{e2/x} = e3 x{e/x} = e y != x y{e/x} = y e1{e2/x} = e3 y!=x y not in FV(e2) (y.e1){e2/x} = y.e3 ea{e2/x} = ea eb{e2/x} = eb (ea eb) {e2/x} = ea eb Lecture 4

(x.e1){e2/x} = x.e1 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 48 More explicit approach While everyone in the PL field: Understands the capture problem Avoids it by saying implicit systematic renaming you may find that unsatisfying especially if you have to implement substitution while avoiding capture So this more explicit version also works (fresh z for y): z not in FV(e1) U FV(e2) U {x} e1{z/y} = e3 e3{e2/x} = e4 (y.e1){e2/x} = z.e4

You have to find an appropriate z, but one always exists and __$$tmp appended to a global counter probably works Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 49 Note on metasyntax Substitution often thought of as a metafunction, not a judgment Ive seen many nondeterministic languages But never a nondeterministic definition of substitution So instead of writing: e1 x. e3 e2 v2 e3{v2/x} = e4 e4 v [app] e1 e2 v Just write: e1 x. e3 e2 v2 e3{v2/x} v

[app] e1 e2 v Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 50 What will we do Go back to math metalanguage Notes on concrete syntax (relates to OCaml) Define semantics with inference rules Lambda encodings (show our language is mighty) Define substitution precisely Environments Next time?? Small-step Play with continuations (very fancy language feature)

Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 51 Where were going Done: large-step for untyped lambda-calculus CBV and CBN Note: infinite number of other reduction strategies Amazing fact: all equivalent if you ignore termination! Now other semantics, all equivalent to CBV: With environments (in OCaml to prep for Homework 3) Basic small-step (easy) Contextual semantics (similar to small-step) Leads to precise definition of continuations Lecture 4

CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 52 Slide repeat type exp = Var of string | Lam of string*exp | Apply of exp * exp exception BadExp let subst e1_with e2_for x = (*to be discussed*) let rec interp_large e = match e with Var _ -> raise BadExp(*unbound variable*) | Lam _ -> e (*functions are values*) | Apply(e1,e2) -> let v1 = interp_large e1 in let v2 = interp_large e2 in match v1 with Lam(x,e3) -> interp_large (subst e3 v2 x)

| _ -> failwith "impossible" (* why? *) Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 53 Environments Rather than substitute, lets keep a map from variables to values Called an environment Like IMPs heap, but immutable and 1 not enough So a program state is now exp and environment A function body is evaluated under the environment where it was defined! Use closures to store the environment See also Lecture 1 Lecture 4

CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 54 No more substitution type exp = Var of string | Lam of string * exp | Apply of exp * exp | Closure of string * exp * env and env = (string * exp) list let rec interp env e = match e with Var s -> List.assoc s env (* do the lookup *) | Lam(s,e2) -> Closure(s,e2,env) (* store env! *) | Closure _ -> e (* closures are values *) | Apply(e1,e2) -> let v1 = interp env e1 in let v2 = interp env e2 in match v1 with

Closure(s,e3,env2) -> interp((s,v2)::env2) e3 | _ -> failwith "impossible" Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 55 Worth repeating A closure is a pair of code and environment Implementing higher-order functions is not magic or run-time code generation An okay way to think about OCaml Like thinking about OOP in terms of vtables Need not store whole environment of course See Homework 3 Lecture 4

CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman 56 What will we do Go back to math metalanguage Notes on concrete syntax (relates to OCaml) Define semantics with inference rules Lambda encodings (show our language is mighty) Define substitution precisely And revisit function equivalences Environments Next time?? Small-step Play with continuations (very fancy language feature) Lecture 4 CSE P505 August 2016 Dan Grossman

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