Music - Mrs. Clements' Class

Music - Mrs. Clements' Class

MUSIC FOR ALL Kindergarten-Sixth Grade Standards, Vocabulary, Content and Language Objectives, & Lessons/Activities STATE MUSIC CURRICULUM STANDARDS SINGING The student will develop the voice and body as instruments of musical expression. In this standard the student sings to discover and enjoy the literature of childrens songs and to explore and learn about the elements of music. PLAYING The student will play instruments as a means of musical expression. In this standard the student plays classroom instruments to enhance the learning and enjoyment of songs. LISTENING The student will listen to, analyze, and describe music. In this standard the student listens to feel the emotional qualities of the sounds of music and to notice and become acquainted with its elements.

CREATING The students will create music through improvising, arranging, and composing. In this standard the student creates music that expresses his thoughts and feelings and shows some understanding of music elements and skills. Key Concept for Differentiation In an effort to assist teachers in the process of differentiation in Tier One teaching, key concepts have been identified in the curriculum maps as those specific objectives a teacher would focus on during small group instruction with struggling students. Key concepts cover minimum, basic skills and knowledge every student must master. Key concepts are not an alternative to teaching the entire Utah State Core Standards, rather they emphasize which concepts to prioritize for differentiation. 1 Music Expressions Teacher Resource Guide, Warner Bros Publications 2003, pp. 13-16. ISBN 0-7579-1298-2 2 e.g., increased literacy, complex symbolization and meaning skills, integration of sensory data -Richards Institute of ETM, 1985 3e.g. rhythm, accent, timing, flow, pitch, voice inflections, phrasing in reciting a nursery rhyme, telling a story

KINDERGARTEN MUSIC CURRICULUM MAP PREFACE In Kindergarten students develop an awareness of the elements of music through playful song experiences and creative movement. The conceptual sequence begins with opposites and contrasts with kindergarteners, who can identify characteristics and differences more easily when there is a contrast, such as high/low, fast/slow, loud/soft, long/short. Through their participation in music activities the students can develop these important learning skills: The ability to focus and gain intrinsic motivation Social comfort in participating Ease of movement-i.e., the physical ability to move and the desire to try to move

The habit of singing Spatial and sequential reasoning Musical capacity and the ability to recognize and use previously-acquired language skills KINDERGARTEN-MUSIC VOCABULARY 1ST QUARTER MELODY Song Sing/speak Light,unforced Childlike quality Move

Melody Mi-re-do KINDERGARTEN MUSIC VOCABULARY 1ST QUARTER MELODY Hand signs Repeated tones Steps/skips Pitch High/low Up/down Match pitch

MUSIC CONTENT OBJECTIVES-1ST QUARTER MELODY Through playful song experiences and creative movement 1. I can sing with a light, unforced, beautiful childlike quality. 2. I can recognize when melodies move upward or downward or repeat, and make my voice match the pitches. 3. I can express myself through singing and moving to music. MUSIC LANGUAGE OBJECTIVES 1ST QUARTER MELODY Through singing, moving, speaking, and/or hand signs - I can clearly

express how I feel about singing and moving. LESSON ACTIVITIES First I can- Use Hey, Hey, Look At Me (and/or other songs of limited range, e.g., Rain, Rain, Go Away), to help students sing with a light quality in their head voices experiment on various pitches, not ignoring their high tones. Play with the vocal difference between speaking and singing. Teaching Ideas: *Our Amazing Voice!; Developing Singing Skills in the Classroom; 101 Ways to Repeat a Song Second I can- Utilizing instructional strategies from Favorite Songs and/or Lets Do It Again, help children discover melodic direction, repeated tones, and steps and skips. Sing Hot Cross Buns, and experience the descent of the melody using the hand signs as well as desired singing activities from text.

Find additional songs with the same mi-re-do pattern, repeated tones, skips, steps, and help the children recognize them (e.g., Three Blind Mice, Old MacDonald, Mary Had a Little Lamb, Farmer in the Dell, This Old Man, Sally Go Round the Sun, Teddy Bear). Third I can-Play the singing games found in Favorite Songs and Lets Do It Again for these songs: Bluebird, Bluebird, Three Blind Mice, London Bridge, Johnny Get Your Hair Cut, Shake Those Simmons Down, The Farmer in the Dell, Mulberry Bush. Holiday Idea Enjoy singing songs such as this one as you approach the holiday season: Five Fat Turkeys, Boo!, Halloween Witches, The Witch Rides, Thanksgiving RESOURCES Embedded links provide access to selected corresponding music teaching ideas, written scores, and mp3 files for singing, listening and dancing activities from publications such as FAVORITE SONGS AND MUSIC

ACTIVITIES, THE MUSICAL CLASSROOM, and other valuable resources. K; PRE-K STATE MUSIC GUIDEBOOK: Links to additional songs, teaching ideas, music FIRST GRADE MUSIC CURRICULUM MAP PREFACE In first grade students develop an awareness of the elements of music through song experiences, creative movement, and listening activities. The conceptual sequence with first graders builds on the concept of opposites/contrasts by discovering different tone qualities and differences in melodic patterns. Through their participation in music activities the students can develop these important learning skills:

The ability to focus and gain intrinsic motivation Social comfort in participating Ease of movement-i.e., the physical ability to move and the desire to try to move The habit of singing Spatial and sequential reasoning Musical capacity and the ability to recognize and use previously-acquired language skills 1ST GRADE MUSIC VOCABULARY 1ST QUARTER-MELODY Song Echo song Sing/speak

Light, unforced, child-like voice Good posture Breath support Mi-re-do Hand signs Pitch (tone) 1ST GRADE MUSIC VOCABULARY 1ST QUARTER-MELODY Match pitch Up/down High/low

Step/skip Phrase Movement Repeat same/different/similar Melody pattern MUSIC CONTENT OBJECTIVESMELODY 1ST GRADE Through playful song experiences and creative movement1. I can express myself through singing and moving to music. 2. I can sing with a light, unforced, beautiful childlike quality, using good posture and breath support, and match my voice to the pitches. 3. I can recognize when melody patterns are the same, similar, or

different. MUSIC LANGUAGE OBJECTIVES 1ST GRADE-MELODY Through singing, moving, speaking, hand signs, listening, and/or creating: I can clearly communicate what an unforced, childlike singing voice feels like. LESSON ACTIVITIES First I can- Sing a variety of previously learned songs, singing games, and use mire-do hand signs for enjoyment e.g.: Hot Cross Buns, Three Blind Mice, Old MacDonald, Mary Had a Little Lamb, Farmer in the Dell, This Old Man. Second I Can- Use, Johnny Get Your Hair Cut (and other songs of limited range, e.g.,

Tony Chestnut), to help students sing with a light quality in their head voices experiment on various pitches, not ignoring their high tones. Play with the vocal difference between speaking and singing. Help them use good posture and breath support. RESOURCES: *Our Amazing Voice, Developing Singing Skills in the Classroom, 101 Ways to Repeat A Song Third I Can-Utilizing suggestions from Favorite Songs and Lets Do It Again, help children discover same, similar, and different phrases and repeating melodies in these songs: Lil Liza Jane, Did You Ever See A Lassie? In Charlie Over the Ocean, an echo song, every phrase is repeated. In Little Tom Tinker help children discover that every phrase is different. RESOURCES

Embedded links provide access to selected corresponding music teaching ideas, written scores, and mp3 files for singing, listening and dancing activities from publications such as FAVORITE SONGS AND MUSIC ACTIVITIES, THE MUSICAL CLASSROOM, and other valuable resources. 1st Grade STATE MUSIC GUIDEBOOK: Links to additional songs, teaching ideas, music notation, vocabulary, prof. music teaching associations SECOND GRADE MUSIC CURRICULUM MAP PREFACE In second grade students develop an awareness of the elements of music through song experiences, creative movement, and listening activities. The conceptual sequence with second graders focuses on patterns in rhythms, melodies, form and

movement. They can begin to explore and experience melodic rhythms and steady beat through using body percussion, instruments of various tone colors, and performing movement to depict patterns in music. They also learn to recognize musical groups such as ensembles or instrument families. Through their participation in music activities the students can develop these important learning skills: The ability to focus and gain intrinsic motivation Social comfort in participating Ease of movement-i.e., the physical ability to move and the desire to try to move The habit of singing Spatial and sequential reasoning Musical capacity and the ability to recognize and use previously-acquired language skills

2ND GRADE MUSIC VOCABULARY 1ST QUARTER vocal quality accuracy rising/falling interval repeated tones skip/step pitch/tone/note shape of melody 2ND GRADE MUSIC VOCABULARY

1ST QUARTER symbol sound staff lines spaces measure reading music MUSIC CONTENT OBJECTIVESMELODY 2ND GRADE Through structured musical experiences and creative movement: 1. I can sing with a light, unforced, beautiful childlike quality, using good

posture and breath support. 2. I can show through up or down movement when the distance (interval) between two tones is large or small or stays the same. 3. I can notate the mi re do pattern on the lines and spaces of the staff. 4. I can express myself through singing and moving to music. MUSIC LANGUAGE OBJECTIVES 2ND GRADE Through singing, moving, speaking, hand signs, notation, listening, and/or creating: I can demonstrate how notes are placed on the lines and spaces of the staff.

LESSON ACTIVITIES First I Can- Play the singing game Lucy Locket. Observe the child who sings alone and evaluate his/her vocal quality and watch for opportunities to encourage further development. RESOURCES: *Our Amazing Voice, Developing Singing Skills in the Classroom, 101 Ways to Repeat A Song Second I Can- Sing Row, Row, Row Your Boat noticing the small steps as the melody rises and the large skip to the high note beginning and continuing with merrily, merrily, merrily, and notice the small descending steps in life is but a dream. Note: These could be played on a pitched instrument to reinforce the sound. -Through singing and movement, help children detect and show the large and small intervals in songs such as: Are You Sleeping; Bow Belinda; Bluebird, Bluebird; Tinga

Layo; Tony Chestnut. -Help children identify through gesture, body percussion, or rhythm instruments the repeated note patterns in the following songs: If Youre Happy, Bingo, Shell Be Comin Round the Mountain, Sandy Land, Skip to My Lou, and Row, Row Row Your Boat LESSON ACTIVITIES Third I Can -Bow Wow Wow* Use hand signals to show and feel the rise of the melody as it skips up in the first part of the song and skips down in the last part of the song. After many happy experiences with Bow Wow Wow, have the children reflect on the sound of mi re do, and have them show what the last measure of the song looks like in hand signals and on the lines and spaces of the staff. Perhaps the children can recall

the mi re do pattern in previous songs, such as Hot Cross Buns , Three Blind Mice, and Lil Liza Jane, Old MacDonald, Shake Those Simmons Down FourthI can- Enjoy performing a variety of previously learned songs and singing games. RESOURCES Embedded links provide access to selected corresponding music teaching ideas, written scores, and mp3 files for singing, listening and dancing activities from publications such as FAVORITE SONGS AND MUSIC ACTIVITIES, THE MUSICAL CLASSROOM, and other valuable resources. 2nd Grade STATE MUSIC GUIDEBOOK: Links to additional songs,

THIRD GRADE MUSIC FOR LIFE CURRICULUM MAP PREFACE In third grade students develop an understanding of the elements of music through song experiences, creative movement, and listening activities. The conceptual sequence for third grade children combines and builds upon prior knowledge, leading to independent singing and rhythmic competence. They are able to focus on vocal and instrumental tone color, and cultural and historical features of the music literature. At this level the children study various string instruments. Through their participation in music activities the students can develop these important learning skills: The ability to focus and gain intrinsic motivation Social comfort in participating

Ease of movement-i.e., the physical ability to move and the desire to try to move The habit of singing Spatial and sequential reasoning Musical capacity and the ability to recognize and use previously-acquired language skills 3RD GRADE MUSIC VOCABULARY 1ST QUARTER vocal quality posture breath support head voice high tones

accurate pitch (in tune) volume (loud>soft) (soft

intervals music notation music staff measure MUSIC CONTENT OBJECTIVESMELODY 3RD GRADE Through playful song experiences and creative movement 1. I can develop my ability to sing a melody with accurate pitch and rhythm. 2. I can sing with a light, unforced, beautiful childlike quality using good posture and breath support. 3. I can use hand signs to show the direction of simple melody patterns. 4. I

can sing pitches that move up and down or stay the same as I read them in simple music notation. MUSIC LANGUAGE OBJECTIVES 3RD GRADE Through singing, moving, speaking, hand signs, listening, drawing, notation, dramatizing, writing, and/or creating: I can clearly communicate what it means to sing in tune. LESSON ACTIVITIES First and second I Cans - Help children learn to sing songs accurately that may have a wide range, recognizing the low and high tones and how it feels when they

sing those different pitches. Help children realize the high tones are sung in the head voice and with good breath support in order to get an unforced, beautiful child-like quality. Sing the songs many times in a variety of ways, always emphasizing good posture while standing or sitting, or even when having fun by standing on one leg, facing backwards, singing softly, changing the key, closing eyes, etc. Consider songs such as Scotlands Burning, Rocky Mountain, The Ghost of Tom, My Bonnie Lies Over the Ocean, I Love the Mountains, Mama Paquita, Little Tom Tinker. RESOURCES: Our Amazing Voice, Developing Singing Skills in the Classroom, 101 Ways to Repeat A Song LESSON ACTIVITIES

Third and fourth I Cans- Three Blind Mice Relate the downward direction of mi re do hand signs with the downward direction of the mi re do (in three blind mice) notation on the musical staff. In Row, Row, Row Your Boat relate the upward direction of the do re mi (row your boat) pattern to the notation in the first measure of the song. Help children discover the repeated notes before the melody moves up. Suggest that children use the hand signs to help their voices go up and down with the notation. Encourage children to discover these same melodic patterns by singing, using hand signs and pointing it out in the notation in other songs, such as Mary Had a Little Lamb, Hot Cross Buns, Lil Liza Jane, Long Legged Sailor, Mary Had A Baby, Shake Those Simmons Down, Circle Left and The Farmer In The Dell. Hint: When you are studying specific intervals choose songs with a limited range that

emphasize those intervals. RESOURCES Embedded links provide access to selected corresponding music teaching ideas, written scores, and mp3 files for singing, listening and dancing activities from publications such as FAVORITE SONGS AND MUSIC ACTIVITIES, THE MUSICAL CLASSROOM, and other valuable resources. 3rd Grade STATE MUSIC GUIDEBOOK: Links to additional songs, teaching ideas, music notation, vocabulary, prof. music teaching associations FOURTH GRADE MUSIC CURRICULUM MAP PREFACE

In the fourth grade the student expands understanding of the elements of music through performing song games, part songs and accompaniments, creative movement, and listening activities. The conceptual sequence for fourth grade children leads to rhythmic and melodic independence including pitch and beat accuracy, and an understanding of tonality and cultural and historical features. At this level the children study woodwind instruments.+ Through their participation in music activities the students can develop2 these important learning skills: The ability to focus and gain intrinsic motivation Social comfort in participating Ease of movement-i.e., the physical ability to move and the desire to try to move The habit of singing Spatial and sequential reasoning Musical capacity and the ability to recognize and use previously-acquired language skills

MUSIC VOCABULARY 4TH GRADE 1ST QUARTER-MELODY Ostinato Echo song partner songs round harmony pitch accuracy rhythm accuracy MUSIC VOCABULARY 4TH GRADE

1ST QUARTER-MELODY tone tonality major minor scale independent singer staff lines & spaces note recognition CONTENT OBJECTIVES Through playful song experiences and creative movement1. I can sing with a light, unforced, beautiful childlike quality using good

posture and breath support. 2. I can improve my ability to sing a melody with accurate pitch and rhythm. 3. I can develop my ability to sing my own part independently while others are singing a different part in echo songs, rounds and ostinatos. 4. I can tell by the sound whether the song is major or minor. 5. I can develop my ability to play a recorder. LESSON ACTIVITIES First and second I Cans Lead students in singing My Paddle (2pt round), My Bonnie Lies Over the Ocean (AB -verse/chorus), Peace Like a River (abab), Kum Ba Yah (AA-verse/chorus). Listen closely as the children sing

and encourage them to listen to each other and blend their voices in pitch and quality. RESOURCES: Our Amazing Voice, Developing Singing Skills in the Classroom, 101 Ways to Repeat a Song LESSON ACTIVITIES Repeat A Song Third I Can Down by the Bay and Old Texas- In singing these echo songs, help children learn to hold out the long notes while the echo part is sung. This produces harmony. Sing Are You Sleeping and when children are secure with the melody line, consider adding a second part in the form of a simple ostinato. Make the ostinato* by repeating the last phrase (ding dong ding) throughout the song. Notice that an ostinato can be created from any phrase, not just the last.

Expand the experience by adding actions or hand signs that illustrate the words on the ostinato phrase you choose. Expand the experience by adding an action that illustrates the words on the ostinato. A four-part round can be sung if and when the children are ready. Be particularly aware of vocal quality in part-singing, as children may try to sing louder to hold their own. LESSON ACTIVITIES Help children develop rhythmic and tonal (pitch) security as they sing these songs. When they are ready, Let them discover the delight of enjoying them as partner songs: Bow Belinda, Skip to my Lou & Sandy Land.

*Note: A quick way to understand an ostinato is through singing these words (from a Grace Nash workshop) to the melody of Are You Sleeping? Let the children be your echo. Ostinato, ostinato; What are you, What are you? Im a little pattern, Im a little pattern; Stubborn too, stubborn too. FIFTH GRADE MUSIC CURRICULUM MAP PREFACE In the fifth grade the student shows competence in understanding the elements of music through song games, two-part singing, creative movement, playing accompaniment, listening activities, gaining familiarity with masterworks, and identifying instrumental qualities. The conceptual sequence for fifth grade children is to expand their ability to perform and enjoy their understanding of a wide range of music.

They are intellectually and developmentally ready to put concepts into a more personal context and discover how music impacts their life as they become discriminating creators and listeners of music. At this level children study brass instruments. Through their participation in music activities the students can develop these important learning skills: The ability to focus and gain intrinsic motivation Social comfort in participating Ease of movement-i.e., the physical ability to move and the desire to try to move The habit of singing Spatial and sequential reasoning Musical capacity and the ability to recognize and use previously-acquired language skills MUSIC 5TH GRADE VOCABULARY 1ST QUARTER-MELODY

vocal quality Pitch accuracy Rhythm Accuracy independent singing 2-part singing home tone (tonal center, or key) Instrumental music Tonalities major /minor CONTENT OBJECTIVES Through song experiences, two-part singing, and listening activities: 1. I can sing with a light, unforced, beautiful, childlike quality using good

posture and breath support. 2. I can improve my ability to sing a melody line with accurate pitch and rhythm. 3. I can develop my ability to read and sing my own part independently while others are singing a different part. 4. I can recognize the home tone of songs. 5. I can distinguish the difference in color between major and minor tonality in songs and instrumental works LANGUAGE OBJECTIVES Through singing, moving, speaking, hand signs, listening, drawing, notation, dramatizing, writing, mapping, and/or creating: I can clearly

communicate differences between major & minor tonalities. LESSON ACTIVITIES First, second, and third I Cans: Sing part songs, partner songs, rounds, songs with descants and ostinatos, as well as unison songs to develop skill and independence. Select such songs as: Chumbara, Rock-a-My Soul & Hes Got the Whole World in His Hands, Old Abram Brown, Cindy, Hey Ho, & Oh Susanna . Note: See Developing Singing Skills , Our Amazing Voice , 101 Ways to Repeat A Song Fourth I Can: Sing a familiar song together, such as America, or Row, Row, Row, Swing Low, Sweet Chariot and stop just before the last note. Ask where does the voice want to go? To the home tone of course, which

is the tonal center (or key) of the song. LESSON ACTIVITIES Fifth I Can: Have students become familiar with Erie Canal and help them recognize the difference in color or mood between the minor verse and the major chorus. Ask them why they think the verse is in a minor tonality and the chorus is in a major tonality. Can they get a clue from the words? Have the students practice their ability to identify major and minor tonalities by listening to the accompaniments and by singing or playing such songs as: (minor) Johnny Has Gone For a Soldier (recorder); (major) All Night, All Dayrecorder on all night, all day; (minor) Follow the Drinking Gourd, When Johnny Comes Marching Home; (major) Cindy, Clementine, Kum Ba Yah -recorder), Cotton-Eyed Joe-recorder. LISTEN to the 1st movement of Mozarts Symph #40 in G-minor and compare it to 1st movement of Mozarts Eine Kleine Nacht Musik (in major).

Play other recordings in both major and minor and see if children can hear the difference in tonality. Holiday: Halloween Night ABC p. 34 2-pt song; Ghost of Tom, The (BYU); Night on Bald Mountain These are all in Minor RESOURCES Embedded links provide access to selected corresponding music teaching ideas, written scores, and mp3 files for singing, listening and dancing activities from publications such as FAVORITE SONGS AND MUSIC ACTIVITIES, THE MUSICAL CLASSROOM, and other valuable resources. 5th Grade STATE MUSIC GUIDEBOOK. Links to additional songs, teaching ideas, music notation, vocabulary, prof. music teaching

SIXTH GRADE MUSIC CURRICULUM MAP PREFACE In the sixth grade the student shows increased competence in understanding the elements of music through song games, two and three-part singing, movement, improvising and playing accompaniments, and listening activities. The conceptual sequence for the students culminates in their expanded ability to perform and enjoy a wide range of music experienced throughout their elementary school years. They are able to begin making choices about their personal connections with music, as well as their pursuit of music as students, performers, listeners and creators. At this level, the students study percussion and keyboard instruments. Through their participation in music activities the students can develop these important learning skills: The ability to focus and gain intrinsic motivation

Social comfort in participating Ease of movement-i.e., the physical ability to move and the desire to try to move The habit of singing Spatial and sequential reasoning Musical capacity and the ability to recognize and use previously-acquired language skills MUSIC 6TH GRADE VOCABULARY1ST QUARTER-MELODY vocal quality pitch accuracy rhythm accuracy major & minor tonalities independent singing

2 and 3-part singing EMPHASIS CONCEPTS Note: Singing counter melodies and descants constitutes another of the many approaches to part singing. A counter melody is an added melodic part, usually lower than the original melody, which often imitates it and often moves in a contrary motion to it. Ideally, a descant is a melody in its own right although written to accompany another melody. In practice, the descant is subordinate to the melody. It is usually higher in pitch than the melody and a small group of children sing it while the majority of the children sing the melody. The reason for this is that high pitches sound relatively louder than low pitches when they are combined in part singing; therefore a small group on a high part balances with a larger group

on a low part. When the teacher understands the relation between counter melodies or descants and the chords and the original melodies, he can guide children to compose them. This is from Music in the Elementary School by Robert Evans Nye and Vernice Trousdale Nye. Prentice-Hall, Inc. 1957. p. 203 CONTENT OBJECTIVES Through song games, unison, two and three-part singing, 1. I can sing with a light, unforced, beautiful childlike quality using good posture and breath support. 2. I can increase my ability to read and sing a melody line with accurate pitch and rhythm.

3 I can increase my ability and independence in singing unison songs, partner songs, rounds, two and three-part harmony, and songs with descants and countermelodies. 4. I can recognize the home tone of songs and distinguish the difference in color between major and minor tonality in songs and instrumental works. 5. I can express my own feelings and thoughts through singing and moving to music. LANGUAGE OBJECTIVES Through singing, moving, speaking, hand signs, listening, drawing, notation, dramatizing, and/or writing: I can clearly explain the differences between unison songs, partner songs, rounds, two and three-part

harmony, and songs with descants and countermelodies. LESSON ACTIVITIES First I Can Lead children in songs such as: Amazing Grace, Peace Like a River, Simple Gifts, Take Me Out to the Ballgame, Oh How Lovely Is the Evening, Oh Shenandoah Second I Can Help the children sing and explore new songs, paying attention to skips and steps and interesting rhythm patterns in such songs as Charlotte Town, Swing Low, Sweet Chariot & All Night, All Day, and by singing or playing such songs as: MINOR: Halloween Night & Tum Balalyka part singing; Hey Ho Nobody Home round, We Come to Greet You In Peace, When Johnny Comes Marching Home;

MAJOR: Wabash Cannon Ball; Sourwood Mountain, Little Wheel A-Turnin, Oh Shenandoah, The Water is Wide-part singing, Dry Bones-unison, Kum Ba Yah , Cotton-Eyed Joe , All Night, All Daymelodies could be played on recorder. LESSON ACTIVITIES CONTINUED Third I Can Participate with the children in singing songs and games such as: Our Old Sow, (unison song game); Swing Low, Sweet Chariot w/All Night, All Day, My Homes in Montana w/Home on the Range, Three Blind Mice w/Are You Sleeping (partner songs); You Are My Sunshine (2-part harmony on refrain); Oh How Lovely Is the Evening (round, 2 & 3-part harmony), Simple Gifts (3 part vocal accompaniment); Star Spangled Banner, Cindy-key of F (descant); Charlotte Town (countermelody).

Fourth I Can Sing a familiar song together, such as: Take Me Out to the Ball Game, or, Swing Low, Sweet Chariot and stop just before the last note. Ask where does the voice want to go? To the home tone of course, which is the tonal center (or key) of the song. Have the students practice their ability to identify major and minor tonalities by listening to the accompaniments, LESSON ACTIVITIES CONTINUED and by singing or playing such songs as: MINOR: Halloween Night & Tum Balalyka part singing; Hey Ho Nobody Home round, We Come to Greet You In Peace, When Johnny Comes Marching Home; MAJOR: Wabash Cannon Ball; Sourwood Mountain, Little Wheel A-Turnin, Oh Shenandoah, The Water

is Wide-part singing, Dry Bones-unison, Kum Ba Yah , Cotton-Eyed Joe , All Night, All Daymelodies could be played on recorder. LESSON ACTIVITIES CONTINUED LISTEN: Ask children to determine the tonality as they listen to instrumental works such as: Brahmss Hungarian Dance #5(minor) and Beethovens Fur Elise (minor); contrast with: Joplins The Entertainer (major), and Wagners Wedding March (major). Fifth I Can Lead students in their expressions of appreciation for nature, home, family, friends, and feelings of excitement/sadness/happiness through such songs as: Simple Gifts, America the Beautiful, (descant); Star Spangled Banner, We Come to Greet you in Peace, I Love the Mountains,

Hes Got the Whole World in His Hands, Make New Friends, This Little Light of Mine, Mama Paquita, Hush Little Baby, You Are My Sunshine.

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