Lesson Study - University of South Florida

Lesson Study - University of South Florida

Lesson Study Amber Brundage Jayna Jenkins Pam Sudduth Shelby Robertson Meet and Greet!! Session Objectives Participants will: Develop common understanding of Lesson Study

Develop teaming structure for Lesson Study Vision, mission, norms, roles, norms, procedures Schedule PD and team meetings (calendar) Select research theme, topic, content area Identify content area standard(s) Prepare for Step 2 Advance Organizer Lesson Study Background, Definition

Develop Team Infrastructure Roles, Norms, Procedures, Vision, Mission Determine Focus Area Investigate and Select Research Theme Select Content, Topic Identify Standards Identify Next Steps

Getting Started Materials Handouts Electronic Materials Norms: The A E I O Us A few agreements for our work together: Ask questions Engage fully Integrate new information

Open your mind to diverse views Utilize what you learn Think and Share On your own, think about Share out Consider this Improving something as complex and

culturally embedded as teaching requires the efforts of all the players including students, parents and politicians. But the teachers must be the driving force behind change. They are best positioned to understand the problems that students face and to generate solutions. Stigler and Heibert (1999) Lesson Study Reflections What you Know

Read Misconceptions About Lesson Study What Questions do you have? What is Lesson Study? Lesson Study Cycle

Lesson Study Defined LS typically involves a group of 3 - 7 teachers working collaboratively through cycles of: planning,

teaching, observing, evaluating, and revising a lesson in order to develop improved ways of supporting pupils learning. Xu and Pedder (2015) Lesson Study Defined Lessons that are developed through LS

process can be understood as working hypotheses, developed together by teachers in Lesson Study teams about how best to support pupils learning in relation to a specific problem or issue their pupils encounter in their learning. Xu and Pedder (2015) Lesson Study Background

Practiced in China and Japan since 1900-1950s 1999 The Teaching Gap: Best Ideas from the Worlds Teachers for Improving Education in the Classroom Investigation of large achievement gaps in math (TIMMS) between US, Germany and Japan Differences between Japan and US scores attributed to teaching practices- literally translated as: Lesson Study 2005 World Association of Lesson Study established Members from 60 countries

Context for Lesson Study Classrooms are far from the ideal learning environments Large amount of content to cover (Desforges, in Dudley 2015) Vast diversity among learners Teacher is outnumbered 20-30:1 A Lesson is like a swiftly flowing river Primary grades teachers engage in 200-300

exchanges every hour with students Results in tacit knowledge teachers often do not consciously have access to Research Outcomes of Lesson Study Xu & Pedder, in Dudley, (2015) Lesson Study in the Context of MTSS Multiple Tiers

of Supports Leadership Problem Solving Process Data Evaluation Capacity Building Infrastructure

Communicatio n& Collaboration MTSS is a framework to ensure successful education outcomes for ALL students by using a databased problem solving process to provide, and evaluate the effectiveness of multiple tiers of integrated academic, behavior, and social-emotional instruction/intervention supports matched to student need in alignment with educational standards. Lesson Study in the Context of MTSS Instruction designed and effectively delivered in

multiple tiers of intensity result in maximum student outcomes for ALL students Strengthens content and pedagogical knowledge to increase student achievement Improves quality of instruction of the tiered continuum of service Provides opportunity to engage in problem solving cycle for continuous improvement What do we want students to know and be able to do?

Why do they not know it or are not able to do it? Is it working? What are we going to do about it? Lesson Study and Problem Solving Step 1: Define

Step 4: Evaluate Step 2: Analyze Step 3: Implement Lets Stop and Reflect

Write additional Thoughts and Big Ideas about LS What Questions do you have? Step 1: Determine Area of Focus Its not about the teacher, its about the instruction and student learning.

Lesson Study in Action Video 1 Effective Teaming: The What Collaboration and Teaming Allows you to: Look at instructional practices from a NEW perspective Critically examine previously held assumptions about student learning

Stimulate creativity Supports outside-the-box thinking Establishes a foundation for collaboration to sustain long-term change Interpersonal Communication (Human Emphasis) 1. 2. 3.

4. 5. 6. Collaborative Relationship Active Involvement Trust/Confidentiality Non-Judgmental Decision-Making Rules Roles and Responsibilities

Characteristics of Effective Teams 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Multidisciplinary representation Specific member roles and responsibilities Well-defined mission

Group norms Regularly scheduled meetings Balanced participation and cooperative relationships 7. Open, collaborative, and positive atmosphere 8. Mutually-agreed upon goals 9. Use data to evaluate goals DeBevoise (1984); McLaughlin & Schwartz (1998) Effective Teaming Roles, Norms, Procedures

Guiding Questions When Developing a Lesson Study Team, Norms and Procedures Forming Lesson Study Team Include

Instructional Staff Instructional Coaches Intervention Specialists Special Educators Content and/or pedagogical expert Administrator Team Example

1 third grade teacher 1 second grade teacher 1 fourth grade teacher 1 ESE teacher 1 resources teacher

1 district language arts director Roles and Responsibilities Examples 1. 2. 3. 4. Team Leader/Facilitator

Recorder/Note-Taker Timekeeper Other? Each role should be covered, but one team member may be responsible for more than one role. Define Team Member Roles Team Lead/Facilitator *

Starts the meeting Reviews purpose Facilitates, keeps the team focused on steps Recorder Takes notes, records minutes, action steps Timekeeper Monitors the time, keeps team aware of time limits by giving warnings (i.e., 10 minutes left) *Team Facilitator will be the direct contact between the LST and the PS/RtI Team

Your Turn: Determine Team Roles Think about the characteristics of professional growth or teamwork settings that have: Encouraged your growth and participation Discouraged your growth and participation Write down some ROLES you feel would be necessary for the team to

function effectively Team Share; Establish Consensus Record on Lesson Study Form Establishing Team Norms 1. Establish norms to build a. Team discipline b. Trust c. Safe environment 2. Developed and agreed upon by all members

3. Helps teams remain focused and on task 4. Process to ensure adherence by all members a. How to monitor rule application b. Ways to recognize exemplary members c. Problem-solve ongoing areas of concern 5. Review and modify, as needed Possible Team Norms Respect and value others: Time

Begin and end on-time Ideas Respectful communication Respectful disagreements Openness to feedback Flexibility in thought/actions Development of consensus Hurd and Licciardo-Musso(2005) Possible Team Norms Continued

Maintain focus: Stay on task Discussion of one topic at a time Stick to the process Engagement: Participation from all group members Take responsibility for the groups success Listen and ask questions Hurd and Licciardo-Musso(2005) Your Turn: Determine Team Norms

Think about the characteristics of professional growth or teamwork settings that have: Encouraged your growth and participation Discouraged your growth and participation Write down some NORMS you feel would be necessary for the team to function effectively Team Share; Establish Consensus

Record on Lesson Study Form Possible Team Procedures Development and adherence to an agenda for each meeting Designation and utilization of roles Decisions are made by consensus and if consensus cant be reached the administrator makes the decision Consistent planning template/tools are utilized Specified methods for communication

between members Your Turn: Determine Team Procedures Think about the characteristics of professional growth or teamwork settings that have: Encouraged your growth and participation Discouraged your growth and participation Write down some PROCEDURES you

feel would be necessary for the team to function effectively Team Share; Establish Consensus Record on Lesson Study Document Vision and Mission Vision/Mission Vision (Future/Where) Source of inspiration and motivation Enhance buy-in and commitment

Outlines where you want to be in the future Mission (Present/How) Creates focus and provides direction Helps support decision-making Outlines how to get where you want to be Bronson Elementary Lesson Study Team Bronson Elementary School In a cooperative effort by school, community and home, we strive to provide a safe environment in which students are expected to

master skills that help them reach their full potential in life. Vision To create a better understanding of how to implement the lesson study cycle and build capacity from year to year. Mission To help students become creative problem solvers through writing and critical thinking and therefore, help them reach their maximum potential in life. Developing Your Vision and Mission Guidelines

1. Short, easy to understand, realistic 2. Aligned with district and school mission statements 3. All team members participate 4. Team gains consensus around a statement or visual that represents the total of all statements Prompts 5. Our vision for this team is 6. The mission of this team is

Your Turn: Developing Vision/Mission Think about your ideas for the Lesson Study team vision and mission and write them down Share ideas with the team Establish consensus Record on Lesson Study Team form Progress Check: Step 1

Determining Focus Area Guiding Questions When Setting Team Goals Determine Focus Area Determine

Theme Content Area Topic Interest Area of common difficulty New curriculum Current school improvement goals and areas of focus

Informed Through Existing data Curricula Standards Teacher discussion

School Data: Lets take a Look! X Elementary X Grade Reading % Level 3 and Above 2015 2016

Statewide District X School X Grade Math % Level 3 and Above Statewide District X School 2015

2016 Developing Research Theme Determine the knowledge and skills you would like for students to have when they exit your school/grade-level Determine current level of performance (all students) What data is available to answer this question? What are the gaps you would most like to address?

What are you most curious about regarding: how students learn? what impacts student learning most? Lewis & Hurd, 2011 Investigate How Students Learn Purpose of Investigating How Students Learn Provides insight into: How they make sense of the material

What kinds of difficulties they have How they answer questions How their thinking changes during the lesson Cerbin & Kopp (2006) Methods for Investigating How Students Learn Discuss and review possible sources of information Review research on learning and common

misconceptions relative to topic Collect and share information Review of existing assessment data If topic is new, teach a dirty lesson to collect data Percentage achieving learning goals Utilize learning inventories with a UDL focus Lesson Study in Action Video 2

Developing Research Theme Research Theme Examples How to use technology to increase academic engagement in mathematics How to incorporate UDL to How to assist students in developing effective problem solving skills to support critical

thinking across content areas Selecting a Research Content Area Once the research theme has been determined select content area of focus Examine current data Within the selected content area consider: Commonly difficult topics for students Current and historical data on achievement and engagement

Commonly disliked topics Commonly difficult topics for teachers to teach New curricula or expectations that teachers want to better understand Lewis & Hurd, 2011 Example Considered Instructional strategies to support all students Differentiated instruction

Universal Design for Learning Data results of current abilities and needs Grade-level standards Activities that allow all students to achieve essential concepts and skills Readiness levels and learning styles

Determined Explore Universal Design for Learning and differentiation strategies to ensure third graders fully engage in standards based instruction They: Reviewed research articles Read Strategies That Work (Harvey & Goudvis, 2000) Recorded findings and

discussions Determine Focus Area: Content Area and Topic Lets Stop and Reflect Write additional Thoughts and Big Ideas about LS What Questions do you have?

Progress Check: Step 1 Before Adobe Check-in Session: Conduct Background Research Investigate Student Learning Identify Standard(s) to unpack Investigate and identify instruction and strategies Who will do what, by when?

Organize to share above findings on on Adobe Organize questions to ask on Adobe Calendar Check Adobe Check-in Session: Next Face-to-face session:

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