Historic Pathways to the American Dream Activity 1.5

Historic Pathways to the American Dream Activity 1.5

SPRINGBOARD Activity 1.5 Historic Pathways to the American Dream Students will: identify and evaluate the philosophical, religious, ethical, and social influences that shaped the literature of a period. extrapolate from primary sources to construct an understanding of a philosophical viewpoint. analyze purpose and historical context in varied sources and evaluate the usefulness of those sources. research and identify primary source documents that exemplify philosophical viewpoints. I dont even want to see them!

If I SEE them, I will take them! SPRINGBOARD Activity 1.5 Historic Pathways to the American Dream REVOLUTIONARIES: American colonists who promoted the concept of an American republic where free citizens, not a monarch, were in control. They believed that America had an obligation to the world to become an independent and democratic society. Students will: identify and evaluate the philosophical, religious, ethical, and social influences that shaped the literature of a period. extrapolate from primary sources to construct an understanding of a philosophical viewpoint. analyze purpose and historical context in varied sources and evaluate the usefulness of those sources. research and identify primary source documents that exemplify philosophical viewpoints.

What was their viewpoint? What is their view of God? What are their values? Do they have an optimistic view of life? What are their views of work and worldly success?

Who is their authority? Do they view man as inherently good or evil? How do they define the American Dream? Which values of this group are still prevalent today? Group 2: REVOLUTIONARIES (see notes on handout)

What is their view of God? Deists who thought the universe had a creator, but that he does not concern himself with the daily lives of humans, and does not directly communicate with humans, either by revelation or by sacred books What are their values? Usefulness, success, reason, natural rights Do they have an optimistic or pessimistic view of life? Optimistic What are their views of worldly success? All men can achieve success through work. Who is their authority? Importance of liberty. Do they view man as inherently good or evil? Man is perfectible and basically good. How do they define the American Dream? Which values of this group are still prevalent today?

Group 2: REVOLUTIONARIES (see notes on handout) Directions: Identify all that apply to the REVOLUTIONARIES philosophy. _____ 1. Education is important primarily to increase ones self-knowledge.

_____ 2. Individuals rights are superior to the needs of society. _____ 3. Belief in God has been characteristic of the American Experience. _____ 4. Mankind is basically evil. _____ 5. Education is important primarily to get a job. _____ 6. Truth is found in faith. _____ 7. Human beings are basically good and getting better. _____ 9. Individual liberties must always be controlled by government authority.

_____ 10. Truth can be found in science. _____ 11. The American Dream means making lots of money. _____ 12. Hard work equals success. _____ 13. Everyone can achieve the American Dream. _____ 14. The American Dream includes getting married and having children. Group 2: REVOLUTIONARIES The Declaration of Independence (Lit p. 240) Morgan Freeman Dec of Ind Complete Iceberg in Packet. Springboard Activity 1.5 Reading for Deeper Meaning

THE TIP OF THE ICEBERG 1.What does it (the text) say? Consider summarizing in a few sentences. The document spelled out why the colonies were revolting against Britain and declaring their Independence. It was made up of 4 parts: (1) The Preamble (Introduction) announcing to the world the declaration of freedom , (2) the listing of the Natural Rights they were entitled to, (3) a list of 28 grievances against the King and (4) a resolution of independency specifying the power and rights the new Independent country must have. CONCEPT MAP

Springboard Activity 1.5 Reading for Deeper Meaning JUST BELOW THE SURFACE 2. What does it (the text) mean? What is the point of the text? Why did the author write it? Consider starting your response with, The author wrote _____ to demonstrate/show/clarify/illustrate/relate The main purpose of the Declaration is to justify and formally announce the colonists revolt against England. It explains that if a government is not protecting the peoples rights, the people have the right AND an obligation

to overthrow that government and start a new one. Governments, they believed, should get their power from the people they govern. They presented a list of 28 complaints against the king and empowered the newly forming country as free and independent states. CONCEPT MAP Springboard Activity 1.5 Reading for Deeper Meaning The declaration not only declared liberty for all 13 colonies, but proved that united, the people of America can achieve anything. The declaration is a symbol that even if things look down and the odds are not in our favor, we can prevail if we stand strong and united. The declaration shows that America will not give up in protection of the right to democracy. It further declared that they would not stand for what was to them, tyranny. The declaration shows our strength and pride.

DEEPER MEANING 3.Why does it (the text) matter? What does it contribute to society? How does it define a subset of humanity? How does it relate to us as a species? CONCEPT MAP Group 2: REVOLUTIONARIES Directions: Complete the following mandatory prewriting before you write your final draft. C- (claim that answers the question) WHAT IS THE QUESTION? How are the values of the Revolutionaries evident in The Declaration of Independence?

Revolutionary values = E- (quoted text evidence from the passage to support your claim) R- (reasoning and explanation of how the quote proves the claim for the passage) Group 2: REVOLUTIONARIES Directions: Complete the following mandatory prewriting before you write your final draft. C- (claim that answers the question) WHAT IS THE QUESTION? How are the values of the Revolutionaries evident in The Declaration of Independence? Revolutionary values = freedom/ independence/ natural rights E- (quoted text evidence from the passage to support your claim): when a long train of abuses and usurpationsreduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government. to which the Laws of Nature and of Natures God entitle them

That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and institute a new Government Laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers .to effect their Safety and Happiness. R- (reasoning and explanation of how the quote proves the claim for the passage) Group 2: REVOLUTIONARIES Directions: Complete the following mandatory prewriting before you write your final draft. R- (reasoning and explanation of how the quotes proves the claim for the passage) That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and institute a new Government

This statement expresses the value of freedom by declaring that when a government denies its people their natural rights and becomes destructive of these ends, to their right to happiness, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it. The revolutionaries upheld the value of freedom from oppression and the firm belief that people were entitled to the pursuit of life liberty and happiness above all else. Springboard Activity 1.5 SAQ/Short Answer Question How are the values of the Revolutionaries evident in The Declaration of Independence? Support your answer with evidence from the excerpt. Answer the prompt in the box below. Do not write outside the box; do not draw additional lines or skip lines inside the box.

The Revolutionaries valued freedom and the belief that natural rights, to which the Laws of Nature and of Natures God entitle them were unalienable for all citizens of a country. The declaration expresses the value of freedom by declaring that when a government denies its people their natural rights and becomes destructive of these ends, to their right to happiness, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it. The revolutionaries upheld the value of freedom from oppression and the firm belief that people were entitled to the pursuit of life liberty and happiness above all else. The declaration was a formal announcement to the world that freedom was not just a duty but a right for all. CONCEPT MAP

Recently Viewed Presentations

  • Dementia and Elder Abuse - NLNPEA

    Dementia and Elder Abuse - NLNPEA

    Definition. Elder abuse has been defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as a single or repeated act ,or lack of appropriate action, occurring within any relationship where there is an expectation of trust and which causes harm or distress...
  • Measurement - Mrs. Kemp's Class

    Measurement - Mrs. Kemp's Class

    Start at the center of the circle and draw your lines outward to the circumference. Try to label each piece of the wedge in the wedge first. Draw a line if it does not fit. Circle graphs need to have...
  • Welcome! Introduction to Cable Logging and Improving Efficiency

    Welcome! Introduction to Cable Logging and Improving Efficiency

    Tower Function: Keeps the cable off the ground and provides lift to the stems, especially near the landing Independent or integrated Small (30ft), medium (60ft), large (90ft) Wooden spar, steel tower or lattice tower One-piece, folding or telescoping Carrier Function:...
  • e Dharawal calend  The Dharawal people lived around

    e Dharawal calend The Dharawal people lived around

    The D'harawal calendar. The D'harawal people lived around where Sydney is now. Through their traditions and Dreaming the D'harawal people knew the signs to look for in nature that told them the season.
  • Lecture 1- Introduction

    Lecture 1- Introduction

    a storyboard, i.e. a cartoon-like series of scenes . a Powerpoint slide show. a video simulating the use of a system. a lump of wood (e.g. PalmPilot) a cardboard mock-up. a piece of software with limited functionality written in the...
  • AAE450 Spring 09 - Purdue Engineering

    AAE450 Spring 09 - Purdue Engineering

    Sellers, "Investigation Into Cost-Effective Propulsion System Options for Small Satellites." Journal of Reducing Space Mission Cost, 1998. Pinero and Bowers. "Power Electronics for a Miniaturized Arcjet." 32. nd. Joint Propulsion Conference and Exhibit," 1996. BrittanyWaletzko- ATT <8>
  • LESSON 9: AGGREGATE PLANNING EXAMPLES Outline  Examples  Chase

    LESSON 9: AGGREGATE PLANNING EXAMPLES Outline Examples Chase

    Develop a production plan and calculate the annual cost for a firm whose demand forecast is fall, 10, 000; winter, 8,000; spring 7,000; summer, 12,000. Inventory at the beginning of fall is 500 units. At the beginning of fall you...
  • Settlement History In the Northwest  Up to 1930

    Settlement History In the Northwest Up to 1930

    Times New Roman Default Design Settlement History In the Northwest - Up to 1930 Non-Economic Forces Related to Early Settlement (Johansen) Settlement History In the Northwest - After 1930 The Historic and Modern Role of Timber in the Washington Economy...