Emagram - UMD

Emagram - UMD

Review of Fundamentals of Thermodynamic Objective: To find some useful relations among air temperature, volume, and pressure. Review Ideal Gas Law: PV = nRT P = RdT = RT First Law of Thermodynamics: q = du + w W = pd Uncertainty Analysis P2 Z =H o ln

P1 Ho = R'T =287 303 / 9.80 =8870m g Uncertainty in T: ~ 0.2 K Uncertainty (precision) in p: ~ 0.2 torr If Gaussian, 95% C.I. = 2 Uncertainty Analysis 2

Z Z U = + T p 2 1/2

1/2 2 0.4 2 = + ( ?)

303 Z ln [ ( p- 2 / po )] =0.2 =1ln [ ( p/ po )] p 2 1/2

0.4 2 = + ( 0.2 ) ~ 0.2 303 U =20% at 2 for 95% C.I. Uncertainty Analysis For an airplane at 33,000 (10 km) uncertainty of 2 m (6) is acceptable.

(But T becomes a bigger factor.) Review (cont.) Definition of heat capacity: cv = du/dT = u/T cp = cv + R Reformulation of first law for unit mass of an ideal gas: q = cvdT + pd q = cpdT dp Review (cont.) For an isobaric process:

q = cpdT For an isothermal process: q = dp = pd = w For an isosteric process: q = cvdT = du For an adiabatic process: cvdT = pd and cpdT = dp Review (cont.) For an adiabatic process: cvdT = pd and cpdT = dp du = w (T/T0) = (p/p0)K

Where K = R/cp = 0.286 (T/) = (p/1000)K Define potential temperature: = T(1000/p)K Potential temperature, , is a conserved quantity in an adiabatic process. Review (cont.) definition of as entropy. d q/T d = 0 Entropy is a state variable.

= cpln(/0) In a dry adiabatic process potential temperature doesnt change, thus entropy is conserved. Review (cont.) Remember potential temperature: = T(1000/p)K Potential temperature, , is a conserved quantity in a dry adiabatic process; K = 0.286 New quantity: Equivalent Potential Temperature, e, is conserved in both dry and saturated adiabatic ascent or descent. From Wallace and

Hobbs (p. 85 ), assuming that ws/T 0 then e . -Lvws/cpT ln( ln(/e) e exp(Lvws/cpT) This is a useful quantity for convective processes. Thermodynamic Diagrams Graphic representation of scientific data. Wallace and Hobbs Ch. 3; Salby Ch. 5 GENERAL INTRODUCTION: Thermodynamic (also called adiabatic or aerological) diagrams of various types are in use, and the earliest dates from the 19th century. They are all based on the same principles, and differences are mainly in appearance. Each chart contains five sets of lines:

isobars, isotherms, dry adiabats, pseudo-adiabats & saturation moisture lines. The calculations are based on the basic laws of thermodynamics and temperature-pressure-humidity relationships, that can be accomplished very quickly. The diagrams are such that equal area represents equal energy on any point on the diagram: this simplifies calculation of energy and height variables too when needed. For basic calculation such as condensation level, temperature of free convection, it will be enough to understand what the various sets of lines mean, and more importantly, how to use them. *** THERMODYNAMIC DIAGRAMS *** Page-2 Contd

There are four/five such diagrams called : the Emagram the Tephigram the SkewT/Log P diagram (modified emagram) the Psuedoadiabatic (or Stve) diagram ** The emagram was devised in 1884 by H. Hertz. In this plot, the dry adiabatic lines have an angle of about 45o with the isobars; isopleths of saturation mixing ratio are almost straight and vertical. In 1947, N. Herlofson proposed a modification to the emagram which allows straight, horizontal isobars, and provides for a large angle between isotherms and dry adiabats, similar to that in the tephigram. ** The Tephigram takes its name from the rectangular Cartesian coordinates : temperature and entropy. The Greek letter 'phi' was used for entropy, hence Te-phi-gram

(or T--gram). The diagram was developed by Sir William Napier Shaw, a British meteorologist about 1922 or 1923, and was officially adopted by the International Commission for the Exploration of the Upper Air in 1925. *** THERMODYNAMIC DIAGRAMS *** Page-3 Contd ** The Stve diagram was developed ca 1927 by G. Stve and gained widespread acceptance in the United States: it uses straight lines for the three primary variables, pressure, temperature and potential temperature. In doing so we sacrifices the equal-area requirements (from the original Clapeyron diagram) that are satisfied in the other two diagrams. ** The SkewT/Log(-P) diagram is also in widespread use in North America. This is in

fact a variation on the original Emagram, which was first devised in 1884 by H. Hertz. The area bounded by various lines is linearly proportional to useful physical quantities such as convectively available potential energy (CAPE). We can solve Poissons Eq. graphically: K 0.286 K p 1000 Where p0 is a constant. pK = 0 T =

T Each dry adiabat is a straight line from q q T at 1000 hPa to T = 0 at p = 0. If we skew the isotherms to be at a 45o angle we get the Skew-T ln p diagram. *** THERMODYNAMIC DIAGRAMS *** the Emagram the Tephigram the SkewT/Log P diagram

(modified emagram) the Psuedoadiabatic (or Stve) diagram Isobars and Isotherms Stve Diagram. The pressure and temperature uniquely define the thermodynamic state of a dry air parcel (an imaginary balloon) of unit mass at any time. The horizontal lines represent isobars and the

vertical lines describe isotherms. This is a pseudoadiabatic chart; the isotherms run vertically. Dry Adiabatic Lines These lines represent the change in temperature that an unsaturated air parcel would undergo if moved up and down in the atmosphere and allowed to expand or become compressed (in a dry adiabatic

process) because of the air pressure change in the vertical. Linear wrt Z or ln(p). Pseudo or Wet Adiabatic Lines These curves portray the temperature changes that occur upon a saturated air parcel when vertically displaced. Saturation adiabats appear on the thermodynamic diagram as a set of curves with slopes ranging from

0.2C/100 m in warm air near the surface to that approaching the dry adiabats (1C/100 m) in cold air aloft. Isohume Mixing Ratio Lines These lines (also called saturation mixing ratio lines or isopleths) uniquely define the maximum amount of water vapor that could be held in the atmosphere (saturation mixing ratio) for

each combination of temperature and pressure. These lines can be used to determine whether the parcel were saturated or not. *** Emagram *** The emagram was devised in 1884 by H. Hertz. In this, the dry adiabats make an angle of about 45o with the isobars; isopleths of saturation mixing ratio are almost straight and vertical. In 1947, Herlofson proposed a modification to the emagram which allows straight, horizontal isobars, and provides for a large angle between isotherms and dry adiabats. Area on emagram denotes total work done in a cyclic

process. Energy-per-unit-mass-diagram w = -R T dlnP isotherms isobars RlnP T

T A true thermodynamic diagram has Area Energy *** Emagram *** Emagram *** SkewT-LogP diagram ***

** The SkewT/Log(-P) diagram is also in widespread use in weather services. This is in fact a variation on the original Emagram, first devised in 1884 by H. Hertz. y = -RlnP x = T + klnP k is adjusted to make the angle between isotherms and dry adiabats nearly o 90 . Printable Skew-T: http://www.elsevierdirect.com/companion.jsp? ISBN=9780127329512

Definition Wet bulb potential temperature the temperature an air parcel would have if cooled from it its initial state to saturation and brought 1000 hPa in a moist adiabatic process. Useful in that it is conserved in adiabatic changes. Most easily found with a thermodynamic diagram. See R&Y, figures 2.2 and 2.3. Follow the dry adiabat up from T until it meets the mixing ratio corresponding to Td; this is the Tc. Follow the wet adiabat down to the wet bulb temp (Tw) and wet bulb pot temp (qw) at 1000 hPa.

Start 9/16/14 Tephigram*** ** The Tephigram takes its name from the rectangular Cartesian coordinates : temperature and entropy. Entropy is denoted by Greek letter 'phi' was used, hence Te-phi-gram (or T--gram). The diagram was developed by Sir William Shaw, a British meteorologist about 1922, and was officially adopted by the International Commission for the Exploration of the Upper Air in 1925. An area in the Tephigram denotes total HEAT or ENERGY added to a cyclic process q = T d = cp Td / = cp Td(ln)

lnP T Dry adiabats The tephigram Allows a radiosonde profile to be analysed for stability. Allows calculations involving moisture content (e.g., saturated adiabatic lapse rate) to be performed graphically. Is confusing at first sight!

Basic idea Plot temperature as x-axis and entropy as y d = cpdln so we plot temperature versus ln Adding pressure Our measurements are of temperature and pressure, so we want to represent

pressure on the plot. The curved lines are isopleths of constant pressure, in hPa (mb). Adding moisture information Dew point is a measure of moisture content. The tephigram can be used to convert (T d,T) to mixing ratio. Mass mixing ratio isopleths are light dashed lines. Units are g kg-1 Curved lines are saturated adiabats the path a saturated parcel of air follows on adiabatic

ascent. Rotating plot and plotting profile The diagram is rotated through 45 so that the pressure lines are quasihorizontal Temperature and Dew point are plotted on the diagram. Dew point is simply plotted as a temperature. Here: Pressure, mb Temp., C

Dew point, C 1000 20 15 900 10 9

850 11 5 700 0 -15 500

-25 -40 300 -50 -55 200

-60 100 -60 The Tephigram Saturated adiabatic Constant Mixing ratio

Tephigram Tephigram Application of Tephigram to Determine Td Application of Tephigram to Determine different tempertures Example 1 Pressure, mb

Temp., C Dew point, C 1000 7 6 920

7 7 870 6 0 840

3.5 -1.5 700 -8 -16 500 -27

-36 300 -58 Tropopause Inversion layer Saturated air

250 -67 200 -65 (T = TD) Example 2 Pressure, mb

Temp., C Dew point, C 1000 8.5 5.5 Tropopause 860

0.5 -3 710 -8 -17 550

-21.5 -31.5 490 -22.5 330 -45 285

-51 200 -51 -45 Frontal Inversion layer

*** Stve diagram *** ** The Stve diagram uses straight lines for the three primary variables, pressure, temperature and potential temperature. In doing so we sacrifices the equal-area requirements (from the original Clapeyron diagram) that are satisfied in the other two diagrams. See Salby, Figure 5.5. For an adiabatic process: = T (1000/p)K The Stve diagram is also simply

called adiabatic chart Stve (Pseudoadiabatic) Stuve Can be wrong! Wallace & Hobbs page 352. ND SD North Dakota Thunderstorm Experiment

From Poulida et al. (JGR 1996) showing T, Td, ozone and e. If e is conserved, the storm should top out at ~11 km alt. Flight thru the Cb anvil: North Dakota Thunderstorm Experiment July 28, 1989 Ozone - thin contours Flight track thick contours Shading - cloud thickness Preconvective tropopause Poulida et al., 1996

From Poulida et al. (JGR 1996) showing that ozone and e are conserved and correlated in cloud-free air. CO and O3 Tracer Simulation for June 28, 1989 NDTP storm CO color scale; O3 isolines (a) base simulation; (b) moist boundary condition simulation Note downward ozone transport near rear anvil. Stenchikov et al. (1996) Take Home Messages

Thermo diagrams are a valuable tool. e is a valuable conserved tracer for convective processes. The tropopause is not an iron lid on the troposphere. The composition (H2O, O3 etc.) of the UT/LS (the coldest region of the atmosphere) is controlled by deep convective processes such as MCCs. Not everything you read in

books is right. Whats e900?? If eA = 10B then ln (eA) = ln (10B) Aln(e) = Bln(10) A/B = ln(10) ln( 2.303 e900 ~ 10400. Whats a googol? Also if the e-folding scale height is ~7 km (for whole trop) then the 10-folding scale height is ~2.3*7 = 16.1 km.

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