Cover Title 1 - Diversity Collegium

Cover Title 1 - Diversity Collegium

Miscellaneous GDIB Slides For Expert Panelists & GDIB Users Here is a collection of slides on the GDIB for your use in designing presentations. It generally walks you through the GDIB as if you were reading it. There are a few exceptions to the order and content, but this slide deck is meant to be general. Select the ones you wish to use. Some slides are animated. It is unlikely you will use all the slides. Some slides have notes to help explain the content of the slide. You must have signed the GDIB Permission Agreement to use slides in this deck. Go to Permission Information on www.diversitycollegium.org (scroll from Global D&I Benchmarks) for a copy. As you will read in the Permission Agreement we are striving to keep the design quality and look and feel of the GDIB in all that we do. However, you are welcome to add your logo to this presentation and incorporate these slides in another deck. However we ask that you strive to maintain the look and feel. You are also welcome to translate the slides, although that will require special permission. If you create additional slides / other versions, and are willing to share them, please send to

[email protected] Please remember to show the copyright on all slides. A Tutorial on Global Diversity and Inclusion Benchmarks: Standards for Organizations Around the World By Julie OMara, Alan Richter, and 95 Expert Panelists The GDIB Helps Organizations Realize the depth, breadth, and integrated scope of D&I practices; Assess the current state of D&I;

Determine strategy, and; Measure progress in managing diversity and fostering inclusion. Weve learned what works Helping to ensure that diversity and inclusion work is done at the highest quality level possible If you want a quick fix, GDIB is not for you. The GDIB is Comprehensive

The Diversity Collegium is particularly pleased to sponsor the GDIB because it explains what creating inclusive systems and managing diversity entails. We appreciate that the GDIB represents the best thinking of 95 experts around the world. Extremely significant is that it is free for anyone to use. GDIB Sponsor: The Diversity Collegium Think Tank of practitioners, scholars, and leaders Mission: To advance the field of D&I through dialogues, symposia, research, and publications. 2011

GDIB Co-Authors & 79 Expert Panelists 2016 Tenth Anniversary Edition 2014 Co-Authors & GDIB 95 Expert Panelists Co-Authors & 80 Expert Panelists

2006 GDIB Co-Authors & 47 Expert Panelists 1993 Bench Marks for Diversity Tennessee Valley Authority GDIB EVOLUTION The GDIB is Accessible for People with Disabilities World Wide Web Consortium

an international community that develops Web standards Symbolism of the GDIB Logo The GDIB uses Intercultural English Culturally neutral English principles Clear, translatable language Avoid culturally specific words and phrases, such as idioms or local expressions American English spelling is used Diversity Definition The variety of differences and similarities/

dimensions among people, such as: Age Belief system Class/caste Culture Disability Education Ethnicity Gender Gender identity Generation Geography Job role and function

Language Marital status Mental health Nationality Native or indigenous origins Parental status Personality type Race Religion Sexual orientation Thinking style Work experience

Work style Inclusion Definition A dynamic state of operating in which diversity is leveraged to create a fair, healthy, and high performing organization or community. An inclusive environment ensures equitable access to resources and opportunities for all. It also enables individuals and groups to feel safe, respected, engaged, motivated, and valued for who they are and for their contributions toward organizational societal goals.

Global Definition and Scope These Benchmarks apply to all organizations around the world. They are not limited to multinational organizations that work internationally. They are not specific to a country, culture, D&I approach, sector, industry, or size of organization. Ultimate Goals of Diversity & Inclusion Create a Better World Improve Organizational Performance

Creating A Better World Contribute to the greater good of society Create a world which is fair and just and respectful of individuals and their similarities and differences Create a world where everyone is able to sustain a high quality of life and enjoy peace and prosperity

Globally, social justice underpins much of the D&I work being done in public policy and development initiatives. As well, there are many organizations firmly committed to doing what is right and ethical for all stakeholders. Improving Organizational Performance A more immediate (and some would suggest more direct) outcome of D&I is to help improve organizational performance. This is commonly referred to as the business case or rationale. Each organization should develop its own business case or rationale for D&I.

Improving Organizational Performance A well-designed and well-executed D&I strategy can help an organization: Achieve its organizational vision, mission, strategy and annual goals/objectives Attract and retain diverse talent Build strong and high-performing teams Cultivate leaders who inspire inclusion and champion diversity Improving Organizational Performance (continued) Leverage an extensive range of backgrounds and skills to enhance creativity, innovation and problem solving

Increase engagement, motivation, and productivity Improve the quality of work/life integration Enhance the organizations reputation/brand as an employer or provider of choice Minimize risk/exposure and ensure compliance with legal requirements Sustain an environment that treats people fairly Competenc e Improving Skill, Knowledge, and Ability Social

Justice Treating People Equitably and Ethically Dignity Affirming the Value and Interconnectedness of Every Person Complianc

e Complying with Laws and Regulations Organizatio n Developmen t Improving Organizational Performance

Approaches to Diversity & Inclusion Competence Improving Skill, Knowledge, and Ability COMPETENCE: IMPROVING SKILLS, KNOWLEDGE, AND ABILITY This approach focuses on increasing the competence of individuals and organizations to interact effectively in the context of many similarities and differences. Measures of success align with demonstrated competence.

Terms sometimes used when describing this approach: Awareness Bias reduction (conscious and unconscious) Cultural competence D&I skills training Intercultural communications Multicultural education Compliance Complying with Laws and Regulations

COMPLIANCE: COMPLYING WITH LAWS AND REGULATIONS Most organizational and societal entities have laws, rules, codes, guidelines, norms, and the like that indicate how people within and sometimes outside of those entities are expected and/or required to behave. Terms sometimes used when describing this approach: Affirmative action Employment equity Equal Opportunity Human Rights Regulatory

Representation/targets/quotas Dignity Affirming the Value and Interconnectedness of Every Person DIGNITY: AFFIRMING THE VALUE AND INTERCONNECTEDNESS OF EVERY PERSON This section includes secular and religious perspectives that recognize the value and worth of every human being and our interdependence.

Terms sometimes used when describing this approach: Cultural humility Mindfulness Right thing to do Spirituality Unity Values Organization al Developmen t

ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: IMPROVING ORGANIZATIONAL PERFORMANCE Improving Organizational Performance This approach is distinguished by the weighting of performance goals in determining which actions to take to optimize personal and organizational performance. Terms sometimes used when describing this approach: Business imperative Change management Culture change

Leveraging diversity/differences Systems change Transformation Social Justice Treating People Equitability and Ethically SOCIAL JUSTICE: TREATING PEOPLE EQUITABLY AND ETHICALLY This approach is aimed at achieving justice and fairness,

ultimately for everyone. Terms sometimes used when describing this approach: Equity Restorative justice Human rights Social justice Overcoming/dismantling Social responsibility oppression Effective D&I work is achievable when it is strategic, tied to the mission and goals of the organization,

led with competence and care, and implemented in a sustainable manner. Lynda White Past-President of The Diversity Collegium footer text Were committed to creating a diverse and inclusive environment that drives ideas and innovation, and will help us better meet the financial needs of our customers. Lorie Valle-Yaez,

Vice President and Chief Diversity Officer Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company Springfield, Massachusetts We customized the GDIB for cultural, localized meanings. When D&I was first introduced in Japan several years ago, it was seen as a western concept. In fact, there is not a Japanese character for the word inclusion. The benchmarks accurately guided us when we broke inclusion down into traits and other descriptive statements. Janelle Sasaki

Executive Director of Diversity & Inclusion Services Ernst & Young Advisory Co., Ltd. Tokyo, Japan The practical steps and incremental nature of the GDIB provides a clear sense of where you are and where you want to be. Nene Molefi Managing Director Mandate Molefi Johannesburg, South Africa footer text

The GDIB spells out what good, better, and best work is. It readily frames where an organization can focus its capabilities. Ralph de Chabert Senior Vice-President Global Chief Diversity Officer Brown-Forman Corporation Louisville, Kentucky The GDIB is a great tool to telescope from the macro to micro context

when there are specific concerns or issues that must be reconciled. Cindi Love Executive Director American College Personnel Association Washington, DC footer text The GDIB was created through a systematic and rigorous consensus of D&I experts. It was a year-long research process where the viewpoints of a significantly diverse group of experts many of

whom approached D&I work in very different ways came to agreement on the outcomes that are needed. Modeling both diversity and inclusion throughout this process reminded us that while this work can be challenging, it is also hugely rewarding. Duncan Smith Founder and Principal ADC Associates Melbourne, Australia A benchmark is: An organizational standard of performance, usually stated as an end result or outcome.

Benchmarking helps people in organizations achieve high-quality results or aspirations. 14 Categories in Four Groups Foundation Drive the Strategy Bridging Align & Connect 1: D&I Vision, Strategy, and Business Case 8: Assessment, Measure, and Research

2: Leadership and Accountability 9: D&I Communications 3: D&I Structure and Implementation 10: Connecting D&I and Sustainability Internal Attract & Retain People External Listen to & Serve Society

4: Recruitment, Retention, Development, 11: Community, Government Relations, and Advancement and Social Responsibility 5: Benefits, Work-Life Integration, and 12: Products and Services Development Flexibility

13: Marketing and Customer Service 6: Job Design, Classification, and 14: Supplier Diversity Compensation 7: D&I Learning and Education GDIB Actions DRIVE THE STRATEGY Develop a strong rationale for D&I vision and strategy and align it to organizational goals. Hold leaders accountable for implementing the

organizations D&I vision, setting goals, achieving results, and being role models. Provide dedicated support and structure with authority and budget to effectively implement D&I. GDIB Actions ATTRACT & RETAIN PEOPLE Ensure that D&I is integrated into recruitment, talent development, advancement, and retention. Achieve work-life integration and flexibility. Ensure that job design and classification are unbiased, and compensation is equitable. Educate leaders and employees so they have a

high level of D&I competence. GDIB Actions ALIGN & CONNECT Ensure that assessment, measurement, and research guide D&I decisions. Make communication a crucial force in achieving the organizations D&I goals. Connect the D&I and Sustainability initiatives to increase the effectiveness of both. GDIB Actions LISTEN TO & SERVE SOCIETY Advocate for D&I progress within local

communities and society at large. Embed D&I in product and service development to serve diverse customers and clients. Integrate D&I into marketing and customer service. Promote and nurture a diverse supplier base and encourage suppliers to advocate for D&I. The GDIB Model BEST PRACTICE 5 4

3 2 Demonstrating current best practices in D&I; exemplary for other organizations globally. PROGRESSIVE Implementing D&I systemically; showing improved results and outcomes. PROACTIVE A clear awareness of the value of D&I; starting to implement D&I systemically.

REACTIVE A compliance mindset; actions are only taken in compliance with relevant laws and social pressures. INACTIVE 1 No D&I work has begun; diversity and a culture of inclusion are not part of organizational goals. FIVE LEVELS of PROGRESS Drive the Strategy

Develop a strong rationale for D&I vision and strategy and align it to organizational goals Category 1 D&I Vision, Strategy, and Business Case Hold leaders accountable for

implementing the organizations D&I vision, setting goals, achieving results, and being role models Provide dedicated support structure with authority and budget to and effectively

implement D&I Category 2 Category 3 Leadership and Accountability D&I Structure and Implementation FOUNDATION

Attract & Retain People Ensure that D&I is integrated into recruitment, talent development, advancement, and retention Achieve work-life integration and flexibility Category 4 Recruitment,

Retention, Development, and Advancement Category 5 Benefits, WorkLife Integration, and Flexibility Ensure that job design Educate leaders and and classification are

unbiased, and compensation is equitable Category 6 Job Design, Classification, and Compensation INTERNAL employees so they have a high level of D&I competence

Category 7 D&I Learning and Education Align and Connect Ensure that assessment, measurement, and research guide D&I decisions Make communication a

crucial force in achieving the organizations D&I goals. Connect the D&I and Sustainability initiatives to increase the effectiveness of both Category 8

Category 9 Category 10 Assessment, Measurement, and Research D&I Communications Connecting D&I and Sustainability

BRIDGING Listen to and Serve Society Advocate for D&I progress within local communities and society at large Category 11 Community,

Government Relations, and Social Responsibility Embed D&I in product and service development to serve diverse customers and clients Category 12 Products and Services

Development Promote and nurture Integrate D&I into marketing and customer service a diverse supplier base and encourage suppliers to advocate for D&I Category 13 Marketing and

Customer Service Category 14 Supplier Diversity EXTERNAL New for 2016 Connecting D&I and Sustainability Why the addition?

Growing trend of some organizations connecting D&I with organizational sustainability processes and outcomes & Transforming Our World: The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development ~Adopted by all 193 Governments of the United Nations, September 2015

BRIDGING Sustainability Five (5) Ps People Planet Prosperity Peace Partnership Sample Benchmarks at Level 5 Best Practice Category 1: D&I Vision, Strategy, and Business Case Action: Develop a Strong Rationale for D&I Vision and Strategy

and Align it to Organizational Goals 1.1 D&I is embedded in organizational culture and is not seen as an isolated program but rather as a core value, a source of innovation, and a means to growth and success. 1.2 All the major components of D&I work, including vision, strategy, business case or rationale, goals, policies, principles, and competencies, are regularly reviewed. Sample Benchmarks at Level 5 Best Practice Category 2: Leadership and Accountability Action: Hold leaders accountable for implementing the organizations D&I vision, setting goals, achieving

results, and being role models. 2.3 Leaders are seen as change agents and role models and inspire others to take individual responsibility and become role models themselves. 2.1 A large majority of employees across an array of diversity dimensions rate their leaders as treating them fairly and inclusively. Sample Benchmarks at Level 5 Best Practice Category 3: D&I Structure and Implementation Action: Provide dedicated support and structure with authority and budget to effectively implement D&I. 3.1 The most senior D&I professional is an equal and influential partner

on the senior leadership team. 3.4 D&I is well integrated into core organizational systems and practices. Sample Benchmarks at Level 5 Best Practice Category 4: Recruitment, Retention, Development and Advancement Action: Ensure that D&I is integrated into recruitment, talent development, advancement, and retention. 4.1 The organizations talent development processes have resulted in equitable and accessible recruitment, retention, and advancement and a pervasive feeling of inclusion. 4.3 The organizations reputation for quality D&I efforts enhances its

ability to attract and retain employees who contribute to outstanding organizational results. Sample Benchmarks at Level 5 Best Practice Category 5: Benefits, Work-Life Integration, and Flexibility Action: Achieve work-life integration and flexibility. 5.5 Based on research and assessment, benefits and services are regularly adapted to changing conditions, technology, and innovative ideas. 5.4 A comprehensive range of flexible benefits and services, including education, health, and counseling, is provided.

Sample Benchmarks at Level 5 Best Practice Category 6: Job Design, Classification and Compensation Action: Ensure that job design and classification are unbiased and compensation is equitable. 6.3 Inequitable previous compensation systems have been addressed and individuals compensated. 6.2 Innovative job design results in employees being paid for performance rather than putting in time, and enables flexible work options. Sample Benchmarks at Level 5 Best Practice

Category 7: D&I Learning and Education Action: Educate leaders and employees so they have a high level of D&I competence. 7.1 D&I is integrated into all learning and advances the organizations 6.3 strategy. 7.4 Challenging and sometimes controversial issues such as racism, sexism, ageism, classism, heterosexism, religious bias, stereotype threat, and unconscious bias are effectively addressed with sensitivity, fairness, conviction, and compassion. Sample Benchmarks at Level 5 Best Practice Category 8: Assessment, Measurement,

and Research Action: Ensure that assessment, measurement, and research guide D&I decisions. 8.1 In-depth D&I assessments covering behavior, attitude, and perception are regularly conducted for the overall organization and within organizational units and feed into strategy and implementation. 8.2 D&I measurements are included as part of the organizations overall performance, linked to the organizational strategy, and tied to compensation, and publically shared. Sample Benchmarks at Level 5 Best Practice Category 9: D&I Communications Action: Make communication a crucial force in

achieving the organizations D&I goals. 9.3 D&I communication is frequent, ongoing, innovative, and contributes to an enhanced reputation for the organization. 9.2 D&I topics are easily and quickly located on the organizations internal and external websites. Information is thorough, fully accessible, and regularly updated. Sample Benchmarks at Level 5 Best Practice Category 10: Connecting D&I and Sustainability Action: Connect the D&I and Sustainability initiatives to increase the effectiveness of both. 10.4 The organization has evidence that its sustainability and D&I

initiatives benefit from their alignment with each other and show more meaningful impact than if they were separate and unconnected initiatives. 10.5 D&I results reflect actions in at least three of the following aspects of sustainability as defined by the United NationsPeople, Planet, Prosperity, Peace, or Partnership. Sample Benchmarks at Level 5 Best Practice Category 11: Community, Government Relations and Social Responsibility Action: Advocate for D&I progress within local communities and society at large. 11.3 The organization leads in supporting and advocating for diversityrelated interests in government and societal affairs. 11.5 The organizations D&I initiatives in the community are treated as

more than philanthropy. They are perceived as a core function mainstreamed into organizational strategy. Sample Benchmarks at Level 5 Best Practice Category 12: Products and Services Development Action: Embed D&I in products and services development to serve diverse customers and clients. 12.1 The product, service, and policy development cycle recognizes diversity and accessibility from the outset. It doesnt merely adapt products first developed for the dominant group or culture. 12.3 The organization shows the link between diversity and innovation, consistently leveraging D&I to increase product and service innovation.

Sample Benchmarks at Level 5 Best Practice Category 13: Marketing and Customer Service Action: Integrate D&I into marketing and customer service. 13.2 The organization is keenly aware of the needs, motivations, and perspectives of diverse customer and stakeholder groups and successfully adapts marketing, sales, and distribution strategies to meet these needs. 13.1 The organization uses sophisticated analysis techniques on an ongoing basis to understand and respond to its diverse customer base. Sample Benchmarks at Level 5 Best Practice

Category 14: Supplier Diversity Action: Promote and nurture a diverse supplier base and encourage suppliers to advocate for D&I. 14.2 The organizations suppliers reflect the communitys composition across a broad array of diversity dimensions. 14.1 The organizations suppliers are required to have a significant percentage of their business with diverse suppliers and to provide evidence that they are committed to achieving their own D&I goals. Uses of Benchmarks in Your Organization: To set and stretch standards and agree on your desired state To assess the current state of D&I

To engage employees To determine short-term and long-term goals To measure progress To assist in hiring D&I staff & consultants As a gift to organizations in your community Research / Expert Panelists GDIB represents the collective viewpoints of the Expert Panelists. Selected by the authors from recommendations based on criteria of breadth and depth in D&I. Practitioners, scholars, authors from a variety of diversity dimensions, backgrounds, and areas of expertise. Research process involved several rounds of review and

analysis. Who is Using the GDIB and What Does Using Mean? Users in our lexicon are those who have signed the Permission Agreement. Truth is, we cant keep track. But, actually, GDIB is like a book in some ways. People read or skim it and learn from it, but they may not consider that action using it. What we really want to do is acknowledge best practices so we dont care if they are a user or not we want to use GDIB to influence higher levels of best practice. Exhibit and Suite Party Sponsors

Forum on Workplace Inclusion GDIB, March, 2016 Some Users Permission Granted to Share Best Practice Stories Iron Mountain IBM (Brussels) Her Majestys Revenue and Customs (UK) Autoliv (Sweden) Texas Historical Commission UC Berkeley Rolls Royce Americas GDIB Goals

Visibility Usability Relevance Launch Events Coming in 2016 Locally Led -- by EP and Users Learning and Celebrations Planning Underway So Paulo Washington DC Sydney Melbourne London

The Netherlands Pittsburgh Philadelphia Seattle San Diego Los Angeles Portland Tokyo Toronto Argentina (webinar) New York San Francisco/Oakland More

For More Information Visit www.diversitycollegium.org Navigate to Global D&I Benchmarks Use and Permissions Global Diversity and Inclusion Benchmarks (GDIB) is distributed as a PDF document. Permission to use this tool will be granted at no cost by signing an agreement with the authors. To download the GDIB, for the Permissions Agreement, and additional tools and resources, go to: www.diversitycollegium.org Julie OMara Alan Richter

+ 1-702-541-8920 + 1-212-724-2833 [email protected] [email protected] www.omaraassoc.com www.qedconsulting.com

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