Composition 3 - Welcome to Mrs. Hackworth's Weebly!

Composition 3 - Welcome to Mrs. Hackworth's Weebly!

Plagiarism 101: Comp 2 Mrs. Hackworth Plagiarism: The process of taking someone else's work or ideas and passing them

off as one's own. There are ten different types of plagiarism: You do not need to know these word-for-word, but try to understand the ideas. Taken from Turnitin.com How do instructors

identify plagiarism? simply past turnitin.com, which doesnt perceive all of the previous types of plagiarism discussed? Just remember: instructors know your skill set

Instructors have dozens of students in your skill range. Instructors have seen hundreds of writing samples from those students. Instructors know your writing style. All of this means that plagiarized work does stand out in the crowd. Avoiding Plagiarism: CITE EVERYTHING

CORRECTLY! Case: 1 Source: Diamond, Jared. Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fate of Human Societies. New York and London: W. W. Norton & Co., 1999. 159. "The ways in which domesticated animals have diverged from their wild ancestors include the following. Many species changed in size:

cows, pigs, and sheep became smaller under domestication, while guinea pigs became larger." Student Writing Sample #1 There are many differences between domesticated and wild animals. OKAY: By definition, domesticated and wild animals are different; thus, the student has not reproduced an idea or piece of research unique to Diamond's work.

Case: 1 Source: Diamond, Jared. Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fate of Human Societies. New York and London: W. W. Norton & Co., 1999. 159. "The ways in which domesticated animals have diverged from their wild ancestors include the following. Many species changed in size: cows, pigs, and sheep became smaller under domestication, while guinea pigs became

larger." Student Writing Sample #2 Domesticated animals diverged from their wild ancestors in numerous ways. Animals such as cows became smaller, while animals such as guinea pigs became larger. NOT OKAY: This sample uses information and ideas from Diamond's passage that are not common knowledge. The writer

simply rephrases each of Diamond's sentences in the original order. Since the student uses no documentation whatsoever, this sample involves plagiarism. Case: 1 Source: Diamond, Jared. Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fate of Human Societies. New York and London: W. W. Norton & Co., 1999. 159.

"The ways in which domesticated animals have diverged from their wild ancestors include the following. Many species changed in size: cows, pigs, and sheep became smaller under domestication, while guinea pigs became larger." Student Writing Sample #3 A careful examination of the ways in which domesticated animals have diverged from their wild ancestors shows that cows, pigs, and sheep became smaller under domestication, while guinea pigs became larger.

NOT OKAY: This writing sample quotes two passages verbatim from Diamond: "the ways in which domesticated animals have diverged from their wild ancestors" and "cows, pigs, and sheep became smaller under domestication, while guinea pigs became larger." Although the student strings these quotations together in his/ her own sentence, both the ideas and phrasing belong to Diamond. Without quotation marks or an attribution to Diamond, this writing sample clearly constitutes plagiarism.

Case: 2 Source: Moers, Ellen. "Female Gothic: The Monster's Mother." Frankenstein. Ed. J. Paul Hunter. New York and London: W. W. Norton, 1996. 214. "In Gothic writings fantasy predominates over reality, the strange over the commonplace, and the supernatural over the natural, with one definite authorial intent: to scare. Not, that is, to reach down into the depths of the soul and purge it with pity and terror (as we say tragedy does), but to get to

the body itself, its glands, epidermis, muscles, and circulatory system, quickly arousing and quickly allaying the physical reactions to fear." Student Writing Sample #1 According to Ellen Moers, Gothic writings "get to the body itself, its glands, epidermis, muscles, and circulatory system, quickly arousing and quickly allaying the physical reactions to fear" (214). OKAY:

This writing sample introduces the quote with an attribution to Moers, then puts her words within quotation marks and gives the appropriate page number. The reader knows exactly which words belong to Moers and where to find the quote in her work. Following MLA format, the full bibliographic information for Moers's article then appears in a "Works Cited" list at the end of the essay; other citation methods may be used in different fields, so check with your instructor for the required format. Case: 2

Source: Moers, Ellen. "Female Gothic: The Monster's Mother." Frankenstein. Ed. J. Paul Hunter. New York and London: W. W. Norton, 1996. 214. "In Gothic writings fantasy predominates over reality, the strange over the commonplace, and the supernatural over the natural, with one definite authorial intent: to scare. Not, that is, to reach down into the depths of the soul and purge it with pity and terror (as we say tragedy does), but to get to the body itself, its glands, epidermis, muscles, and circulatory system, quickly

arousing and quickly allaying the physical reactions to fear." Student Writing Sample #2 Gothic novels such as Frankenstein were written with one definite authorial intent: to scare (Moers 214). NOT OKAY: This is a tricky case. Although the student cites Moers and the page

number in parentheses, there is an unmarked direct quotation in the sentence (i.e. "with one definite authorial intent: to scare"). Without quotation marks to set off this phrase, the reader assumes that only the idea comes from Moers, not the actual words. Furthermore, verbatim use of a striking phrase may make readers who are familiar with the source suspicious of your integrity. Case: 2 Source: Moers, Ellen. "Female Gothic: The Monster's Mother."

Frankenstein. Ed. J. Paul Hunter. New York and London: W. W. Norton, 1996. 214. "In Gothic writings fantasy predominates over reality, the strange over the commonplace, and the supernatural over the natural, with one definite authorial intent: to scare. Not, that is, to reach down into the depths of the soul and purge it with pity and terror (as we say tragedy does), but to get to the body itself, its glands, epidermis, muscles, and circulatory system, quickly arousing and quickly allaying the physical reactions to fear."

Student Writing Sample #3 While tragedy affects the soul, Gothic writings affect the body. NOT OKAY: This writing sample summarizes Moers's opinion about the difference between tragic and Gothic writing. Her definitions of tragedy and Gothic are not common, dictionary definitions; instead, she proposes a specialized way of viewing

both genres as part of her overall theory. In addition, the student borrows Moer's opposition between soul and body, tragedy and Gothic (i.e. why not Gothic and comedy? Gothic and satire? Gothic and epic?). This writing sample thus needs to document its sources Case: 3 Source: Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein. Ed. J. Paul Hunter. New York and London: W. W. Norton & Co., 1996. 70.

"I greedily devoured the remnants of the shepherd's breakfast, which consisted of bread, cheese, milk, and wine; the latter, however, I did not like. Student Writing Sample #1 In his tale, Frankenstein's monster recounts how he greedily devoured the remnants of the shepherd's breakfast, thus showing his extreme hunger.

NOT OKAY: The student here is using a word-for-word quotation (i.e. "greedily devoured the remnants of the shepherd's breakfast") to support the claim that Frankenstein's monster suffered from extreme hunger. While the claim belongs to the student, the phrasing of the evidence belongs to Shelley; to avoid plagiarism, therefore, this direct quotation needs to be set off by quotation marks and properly documented.

Plagiarism Video Baby Kangaroo Tribbiani Plagiarism Activity

Think of a funny story (something that happened this summer or this week). Turn your desk to face a classmate. Decide who is student#1 and who is student #2. Student #2 will tell her story first. Student #1: Pretend like you are a journalist and student #2 is telling you the story for the local newspaper. Try to remember exactly what student #2 is saying. Listen intently

Pay attention to her tone Her hand gestureseverything. Plagiarism Activity continued Student #1 your task is to retell the story that student #2 just told you. Talk the same as her Tone

Hand gestureseverything If time permits, reverse roles: student #1 tells her story. Student #2 now knows the task at hand, and knows what the expectations are. Why did we do this activity?

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