Children'S Internet Usage Study

Children'S Internet Usage Study

CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY (GRADES 4-8) Released April 4, 2016 Prepared For: CENTER FOR CYBER SAFETY AND EDUCATION 311 Park Place Blvd, Suite 400 Clearwater, FL 33759 www.SafeAndSecureOnline.o rg Prepared By: SHUGOLL RESEARCH 7475 Wisconsin Ave. Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY Table Of Contents Section Page BACKGROUND AND METHODOLOGY 1 CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 5 DETAILED FINDINGS 8 Assess Childrens Use Of The Internet Other Than For Homework Or Schoolwork 9 Identify Types Of Electronic Devices Children Have 23

Determine Where Children Use The Internet Without Adults Watching Them 27 Determine Whether Children Have Been Taught To Use The Internet Safely And If They Have Used The Internet In Ways That Their Parents Would Not Approve 31 Assess The Types Of Websites/Apps That Children Visit And Their Activity On Those Websites/Apps 39 Determine Childrens Online Interaction With Strangers 52 APPENDIX: RESPONDENT PROFILE A-1 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY BACKGROUND AND METHODOLOGY CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY Center for Cyber Safety and Education contracted with Shugoll Research to conduct research with children in grades 4 to 8 and their parents to better understand childrens Internet usage behavior and the extent to which they engage in age inappropriate, or even dangerous, behavior while using the Internet. Specific research objectives are to: Assess Childrens Use Of The Internet Other Than For Homework Or Schoolwork Identify Types Of Electronic Devices Children Have Determine Where Children Use The Internet Without Adults Watching Them Determine Whether Children Have Been Taught To Use The Internet Safely And If They Have Used The Internet In Ways That Their Parents Would Not Approve

Assess The Types Of Websites/Apps That Children Visit And Their Activity On Those Websites/Apps Determine Childrens Online Interaction With Strangers An in-person survey was administered to student/parent pairs in Los Angeles, St. Louis, Washington, DC and Baltimore between July 15 th and July 21st, 2015. A total of 192 children with their parents were recruited to research facilities in these cities to complete a 30minute self administered survey on-site. Respondents were divided into two sessions by their grade levels in each market: 4 th & 5th grade and 6th, 7th & 8th grade. A facilitator guided children through the survey in a classroom style room while parents took the survey themselves in the waiting area. Respondents were asked to omit their names from the survey to ensure anonymity. Surveys were collected at the end of each session and data were then tabulated. This report summarizes the results. The project team considered several methodological alternatives for this study that conformed with the ethics of the market research industry. For example, we rejected online surveys because we felt parents should see the questions their children were sent and children would not be honest in their answers with parents monitoring them. The chosen methodology allowed parents to see the exact questions their child received but allowed children to complete the survey without the parent watching. Children were also told that their responses were anonymous and would not be seen by the parents, teachers or anyone. We feel this produced honest responses from the children in an ethical manner. 2 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY A total of 171 student/parent pairs completed the in-person survey (342 surveys total): Los Angeles, July 15th, 2015: 23 4th & 5th Graders / 23 Parents 22 6th, 7th & 8th Graders / 22 Parents St. Louis, July 16th, 2015:

23 4th & 5th Graders / 23 Parents 22 6th, 7th & 8th Graders / 22 Parents Bethesda, Monday, July 20th: 19 4th & 5th Graders / 19 Parents 20 6th, 7th & 8th Graders / 20 Parents Baltimore, Tuesday, July 21st: 17 4th & 5th Graders / 17 Parents 25 6th, 7th & 8th Graders / 25 Parents The sample size was limited by the cost of the chosen methodology and budget constraints. While the data are presented in quantitative form, we recognize that there are a limited number of respondents (data are accurate with +/- 7.6% at a 95% confidence level) chosen from just four cities. The findings are intended to promote conversation about important issues based on this sample limited in size and geography. We do not suggest the data are generalizable nationally. Nevertheless, we believe the data are good indicators directionally of childrens Internet use today. 3 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY All respondents were screened to ensure that they: Were in grades 4-8 during the 2014-2015 school year Have Internet access in their home Spend at least 2 hours per week on the Internet for something besides homework

Use a desktop PC, tablet, smart phone or gaming system to access the Internet Also, for security reasons, parents could not work for a market research company or advertising agency. Children and parents were recruited to reflect a mix on: Gender of the child Public and private schools (with some home schooled children included) Urban and suburban residence Race/ethnicity Annual household income A profile of respondents is shown in Appendix A. Note that demographic information was captured in the parent surveys and then associated with the child in the data tabulations. 4 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATION S 5 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY 1. Almost all children acknowledge that parents and schools are teaching them about Internet safety. However, parents are not always vigilant in their follow-through. They seem unaware of how late children are online (often at midnight or later on a school night and after 1 AM on weekends). Most parents do not frequently monitor their childrens' activity on social media sites including Facebook. They are aware that their children sometimes use the Internet in ways they don't approve, but don't always hold their children (especially younger ones) accountable for that behavior. It seems parents, in particular, need to be given more tools (tips, handbooks) on how to monitor the online behavior of their kids.

2. The fact that children are on the Internet late at night can affect their readiness to learn at school. Almost four in ten say they have been really tired at school because they were up late using the Internet other than to do homework. A few (10%) have come to school late because they were tired from late night Internet use or even were absent from school (5%) because of it. Given how this affects school performance, perhaps teachers and school systems should be a tool in helping students understand appropriate Internet use. 3. The high frequency of Internet use by children alone increases the possibility of using it inappropriately or in dangerous ways. The majority of children are online (excluding for homework or schoolwork) 7 days a week. Even almost half of younger students (4th-5th grade) are online every day. On average, children are online over 4 hours a day on weekends and over 2 hours a day on school days beyond doing homework or other schoolwork. 4. Parents are enabling their children to have online access. Almost three in four kids have been given a cell phone, about two in four have access to a tablet and close to half have a computer in their bedroom. As a result, almost all children say they can and do use the Internet without parents watching them. This is often done on their phone when not at home, at a friend's house or even when they are at home. In addition, those who have their own Facebook page most often say that their parents set up the page for them. Using these tools, children are able to engage in age inappropriate behavior online and even dangerous behavior. About three in ten students acknowledge they use the Internet in ways their parents would not approve. This is particularly true (four in ten) for older students. These activities primarily include lying about their age to get onto an adult website (31%), listening to or downloading music with adult content (31%), watching programs or movies online meant for adults (21%), searching the Internet for topics meant for adults (20%) and using a webcam or Facetime to chat with a stranger (15%). Parents need to be made more aware that inappropriate Internet use is widespread and is engaged in by all types of children. Their own children may not be immune to the dangers. Foundations interested in online behavior, companies with an investment in Internet sites, government agencies and educational associations may need to come together to help adults understand more clearly the dangers lurking online for their children. 6 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY 5. A common form of danger online is when children connect with strangers who can hide their background, including age. Four out of ten children say they have connected with strangers online. Over half doing so tell the stranger they are older than they are or even are an adult. The online interaction with a stranger sometimes progresses to texting or voice conversation by phone. Some give out sensitive information like their phone number or home address. The most dangerous online activity is done by a small percentage of children. Nevertheless, when these percentages are projected to the number of children in these grades in the U.S. population, a lot of children are putting themselves at risk. About 4 percent of children say they have met in person with a stranger they connected with online. Other poor choices made by small numbers of children include posting photos of themselves online or in a text message that parents would find inappropriate (8%) or purchasing something online with a credit card without parental permission (6%). Organizations interested in the field must continue to develop strategies to reduce online risk and keep children safe. While these dangers have been documented in the past, perhaps they need to be made more resonant for today's parents and children. 6. Among the most popular types of websites children visit are gaming sites where you compete against strangers (63%), fantasy sites where you can play a character (59%) and gaming sites that have violent content (50%). Among more troublesome sites, moderate numbers go to chat rooms where they can talk with strangers (21%), sites with sexual photos or videos (17%) or sites with instructions on how to cheat on tests and in school (11%). Small numbers go to sites where you can purchase or learn how to make weapons (5%), dating sites (5%), gambling sites (4%) or sites to purchase alcohol (1%). Owners of these types of sites need to be held more accountable for identifying the age of those accessing their sites.

7. The most popular social media sites among children (all of which enable sharing of content) are Instagram, Snapchat and Vine. Moderate numbers use Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter and Ask.fm (which allows anonymous comments which can be sexual or bullying in nature). The latter is particularly popular with 6th-8th graders. Hazards on these sites increase for those who post on them and almost two thirds say they do. 8. There are few differences by gender in how children use the Internet. Other than boys tending to visit gaming and sports fantasy sites more often, boys and girls have similar access to the Internet and use it in similar ways . 7 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY DETAILED FIN DIN GS 8 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY Objective 1: Assess Childrens Use Of The Internet Other Than For Homework Or Schoolwork 9 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY Assess Childrens Use Of The Internet Other Than For Homework Or Schoolwork Children in grades 4-8 are very active on the Internet: Over half (53%) of these children use the Internet other than for homework or schoolwork 7 days a week (see Figure 1). Boys (50%) and girls (56%) are equally likely to use the Internet 7 days a week (see Figure 2). As one might expect, older children (grades 6-8) are more likely to be online 7 days a week (61%). But even among younger children (grades 4-5), almost half (45%) use the Internet 7 days a week.

Parents (72%) are even more likely to perceive their kids are online 7 days a week. Students spend hours on the Internet each day, on average, even on school nights: Even on days when they are in school and likely have homework, on average respondents spend over 2 hours per day (2.31) on the Internet other than for schoolwork, with almost four in ten (37%) spending 3 hours or more a day online (see Figure 3). On weekdays, 6-8 graders spend an average of almost 3 hours online (2.98) while younger students spend 1.57 hours (see Figure 4). There is no difference by gender, and the average hours named by students matches parents' perceptions (2.31). Children spend, on average, over 4 hours (4.24) per weekend day online (other than for schoolwork), with almost four in ten (38%) spending 5 hours or more per day (see Figure 5). On weekend days, average Internet use jumps to 5.12 hours a day for those in grades 6-8 (it is 3.29 for younger students), with no statistically significant differences by gender or between what children say and their parents' perceptions (4.09) (see Figure 6). 10 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY Assess Childrens Use Of The Internet Other Than For Homework Or Schoolwork Children are sometimes up late on the Internet doing things other than schoolwork: On school nights, almost half of children (49%) have been online at 11 PM or later and a third (33%) have been on the Internet at midnight or after (see Figure 7). The number of 6-8 graders who have been online at midnight or later on school nights is close to half (45%), and is even significant (20%) for those in 4th-5th grade (see Figure 8). There are no differences between girls and boys. Parents significantly underestimate whether their children are online at midnight or later as only 11 percent perceive this to be the case. On weekends, kids can be up and on the Internet after 1 AM (41%) (see Figure 9).

The number of 6-8 graders who have been online at midnight or later on weekends is almost three in four (73%), and is almost half (46%) for those in 4th-5th grade (see Figure 10). There are no differences between girls and boys. Parents significantly underestimate whether their children are online at midnight or later on weekends as only 38 percent perceive this to be true. As a result of late night Internet use on weeknights, a significant number of children (37%) say they sometimes feel really tired at school (see Figure 11). A few have been late to school because of their late night Internet use (10%) or even missed school (5%). 11 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY 100 90 80 Figure 1: Number Of Days Per Week Children Use The Internet Other Than For Homework Or Schoolwork Percentage 70 60 53 50 40 30 20 10 0 Base: Q4: 2 1 0 days 1 day 9 10

12 3 days 4 days 5 days 9 4 2 days 6 days 7 days All children answering (n=171). Other than doing homework or schoolwork, how many days a week would you guess you are using the Internet? 12 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY Figure 2: Percent Who Use The Internet 7 Days A Week Other Than For Homework Or Schoolwork Across Subgroups 100 90 80 72 Percentage 70 60 61 53 50 45 50 56 40 30 20 10

0 Children (a) Base: Q4: Note: **: Parents Perception (b) 4th & 5th Graders (c) 6th, 7th & 8th Graders (d) Boys (e) Girls (f) All respondents answering: Children (n=171), Parent's Perception (n=171), 4th & 5th Graders (n=82**), 6th, 7th & 8th Graders (n=89**), Boys (n=91**), Girls (n=78**). Other than doing homework or schoolwork, how many days a week would you guess you are using the Internet? 7 days Letters indicate statistically significant differences. Warning, small base. 13 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY 100 Figure 3: Number Of Hours Per School Day Children Use The Internet Other Than For Homework Or Schoolwork 90 80 Percentage 70 60 50 40 30 21 20 10 18

21 14 3 9 6 8 0 0 hours Base: Q5: Less than 1 hour 1 hour 2 hours 3 hours 4 hours 5 hours More than 5 hours All children answering (n=171). Other than doing homework or schoolwork, on a typical school day, how many hours would you guess you are using the Internet? 14 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY Figure 4: Average Number Of Hours Children Use The Internet On A School Day Other Than To Do Homework Or Schoolwork Across Subgroups Mean 1 2.98 2.31 2.31

2.07 1.57 Children (a) Base: Q5: Note: **: Parent's Perception (b) 4th & 5th Graders (c) 6th, 7th & 8th Graders (d) Boys (e) 2.53 Girls (f) All respondents answering: Children (n=171), Parent's Perception (n=171), 4th& 5th Graders (n=82**), 6th, 7th & 8th Graders (n=89**), Boys (n=91**), Girls (n=78**). Other than doing homework or schoolwork, on a typical school day, how many hours would you guess you are using the Internet? Letters indicate statistically significant differences. Warning, small base. 15 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY 100 Figure 5: Number Of Hours Per Saturday Or Sunday Children Use The Internet Other Than For Homework Or Schoolwork 90 80 Percentage 70 60 50 40 30 20 10

0 Base: Q6: 9 10 16 13 13 11 8 3 1 0 hours 14 Less than 1 hour 1 hour 2 hours 3 hours 4 hours 5 hours 6 hours 7 hours 2 8 hours More than 8 hours All children answering (n=171). Other than doing homework or schoolwork, on a typical Saturday or Sunday, how many hours would you guess you are using the Internet? 16

CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY Figure 6: Average Number Of Hours Children Use The Internet On A Saturday Or Sunday Other Than To Do Homework Or Schoolwork Across Subgroups 9.0 8.0 Mean 7.0 6.0 5.0 5.12c 4.24 3.95 4.09 4.0 4.51 3.29 3.0 2.0 1.0 0.0 Children (a) Base: Q6: Note: **: Parent's Perception (b) 4th & 5th Graders (c) 6th, 7th & 8th Graders (d) Boys (e) Girls (f) All respondents answering: Children (n=171), Parent's Perception (n=171), 4th & 5th Graders (n=82**), 6th, 7th & 8th Graders (n=89**), Boys (n=91**), Girls (n=78**).

Other than doing homework or schoolwork, on a typical Saturday or Sunday, how many hours would you guess you are using the Internet? Letters indicate statistically significant differences. Warning, small base. 17 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY 100 Figure 7: Latest That Children Have Been On The Internet On A School Night 90 80 Percentage 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 15 15 11 16 16 6 10 11 0 7 PM Base: Q7: 8 PM 9 PM

10 PM 11 PM Midnight 1 AM After 1 AM All children answering (n=166). What is the latest you have been on the Internet on a school night? 18 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY Figure 8: Percent Who Have Been On The Internet Midnight Or Later On A School Night Across Subgroups 100 90 80 Percentage 70 60 45 50 40 33 30 32 34 Boys (e) Girls (f) 20 20 11 10

0 Children (a) Base: Q7: Note: **: Parent's Perception (b) 4th & 5th Graders (c) 6th, 7th & 8th Graders (d) All respondents answering: Children (n=166), Parent's Perception (n=171), 4th & 5th Graders (n=77**), 6th, 7th & 8th Graders (n=89**), Boys (n=88**), Girls (n=76**). What is the latest you have been on the Internet on a school night? Letters indicate statistically significant differences. Warning, small base. 19 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY 100 Figure 9: Latest That Children Have Been On The Internet On A Weekend Night 90 80 Percentage 70 60 50 41 40 30 20 10 0 Base: Q8: 5 5

7 PM 8 PM 9 9 PM 11 10 PM 10 11 PM 12 Midnight 7 1 AM After 1 AM All children answering (n=169). What is the latest you have been on the Internet on a weekend night? 20 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY Figure 10: Percent Who Have Been On The Internet Midnight Or Later On A Weekend Night Across Subgroups 100 90 73 80 Percentage 70 61 60 60 58 46

50 38 40 30 20 10 0 Children (a) Base: Q8: Note: **: Parent's Perception (b) 4th & 5th Graders (c) 6th, 7th & 8th Graders (d) Boys (e) Girls (f) All respondents answering: Children (n=169), Parent's Perception (n=171), 4th & 5th Graders (n=80**), 6th, 7th & 8th Graders (n=89**), Boys (n=90**), Girls (n=77**). What is the latest you have been on the Internet on a weekend night? Letters indicate statistically significant differences. Warning, small base. 21 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY 100 90 80 Figure 11: Ways That Children Have Been Affected In School Due To Being Up Late Using The Internet Other Than To Do Homework Percentage 70 60 50 40

37 30 20 10 10 5 0 Been really tired at school Base: Q9: Q10: Q11: Note: Been late to school Been absent from school All children answering (n=171). Have you ever been really tired in school because you were up late using the Internet other than to do homework? Have you ever been late to school because you were tired from being up late using the Internet for something besides homework? Have you ever been absent from school because you were tired from being up late using the Internet for something besides homework? Percentages represent a Yes response. 22 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY Objective 2: Identify Types Of Electronic Devices Children Have 23 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY Identify Types Of Electronic Devices Children Have Children have significant access to the Internet, which can affect their late night use and long time spent online: A total of 70 percent have a cell phone, 64 percent a tablet and 46 percent a computer in their bedroom (90% have at least one of these) (see Figure 12).

Eighty percent of 6-8 graders have a cell phone as do 59 percent of 4-5 graders (see Figure 13). Around two thirds have a tablet (67% 4-5 graders, 61% 6-8 graders). A computer in their room (other than a tablet) is less prominent (38% 4-5 graders, 53% 6-8 graders). Boys and girls similarly have access to these devices. 24 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY Figure 12: Children Who Have Their Own Cell Phone, Tablet Or Computer In Their Room 100 90 90 80 70 Percentage 70 64 60 46 50 40 30 20 10 0 Cell phone, Tablet or Computer in room (Net) Cell phone Tablet Computer in room Base: Q12: Note: All children answering (n=171). Do you have your own: Percentages represent a Yes response.

25 INTERNET USAGE FigureCHILDRENS 13: Children Who Have Their STUDY Own Cell Phone, Tablet Or Computer In Their Room Across Grade And Gender 100 90 4th & 5th Graders (a) 80 Percentage Boys (c) Girls (d) 74 80 70 6th, 7th & 8th Graders (b) 67 59 67 61 62 67 60 53 50 48 41 38

40 30 20 10 0 Cell phone Base: Q12: Note: **: Tablet Computer in your room All children answering: 4th & 5th Graders (n=81-82**), 6th, 7th & 8th (n=88-89**), Boys (n=90-91**), Girls (n=78**). Do you have your own: Percentages represent a Yes response. Letters indicate statistically significant differences. Warning, small base. 26 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY Objective 3: Determine Where Children Use The Internet Without Adults Watching Them 27 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY Determine Where Children Use The Internet Without Adults Watching Them The wide use of personal electronic devices contributes to the fact that children access the Internet from many places without an adult watching them: Almost all children (98%) access the Internet sometimes without an adult watching them (see Figure 14). Parents agree that their kids sometimes may be unsupervised on the Internet (94%). Internet access without parental oversight happens at home (93%), at friends' homes (79%), on a mobile device when not at home (71%), in restaurants (52%) or in libraries (48%), although in the later case the types of websites that can be accessed may be controlled. Except for at home, parents are less likely to realize that their children are

going online in these various ways. All grade children sometimes use the Internet unsupervised at home (90% 4-5 graders, 96% 6-8 graders) (see Figure 15). But older ones who more often can be in public places on their own are additionally likely to use the Internet without a parent around at a friend's house (70% 4-5 graders, 87% 6-8 graders), on a mobile phone (60% 4-5 graders, 82% 6-8 graders) or in a restaurant (43% 4-5 graders, 61% 6-8 graders). There are few differences by gender. 28 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY Figure 14: Places Where Children Have Used The Internet Without Adults Watching Them 100 98 94 93 88 90 Children (a) 79 80 66 Percentage 70 Parent's Perception (b) 71 64 60 52 48 50 43 36

40 30 20 10 0 Base: Q13: Note: Any (Net) At home At a friends house On a mobile phone when not at home In a restaurant or fast food restaurant) In a library All respondents answering : Children (n=167-171), Parent's Perception (n=169-170). Other than doing homework, do you ever use the Internet without any adults watching you: Percentages represent a Yes response. Letters indicate statistically significant differences. 29 100 CHILDRENS USAGEHave STUDY Figure 15: Places INTERNET Where Children Used The Internet Without Adults Watching Them Across Grade And Gender 97 96 99 98 97 96 90 90 87 89

80 80 82 77 71 71 70 70 Percentage 59 61 60 60 50 43 54 49 47 46 41 40 30 20 10 0 Any (Net) At home At a friends house Base: Q13: Note: **: On a mobile phone when not at home In a restaurant or fast food restaurant)

In a library All children answering: 4th & 5th Graders (n=80-82**), 6th, 7th & 8th (n=87-89**), Boys (n=90-91**), Girls (n=75-78**). Other than doing homework, do you ever use the Internet without any adults watching you: Percentages represent a Yes response. Letters indicate statistically significant differences. 30 Warning, small base. CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY Objective 4: Determine Whether Children Have Been Taught To Use The Internet Safely and If They Have Used The Internet In Ways That Their Parents Would Not Approve 31 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY Determine Whether Children Have Been Taught To Use The Internet Safely And If They Have Used The Internet In Ways That Their Parents Would Not Approve Most children have been taught how to use the Internet safely, but that doesn't mean they always follow what they were taught: Most children (87%) say they have been taught at home or school about safe Internet behavior with a similar number of parents (88%) saying the same (see Figure 16). This is true for both 4-5 graders (83%) and 6-8 graders (90%) as well as boys (84%) and girls (90%). Nevertheless, over a quarter (29%) admit to having used the Internet in a way their parents would not approve (see Figure 17). This is similar to the number of parents saying their child has engaged in such behavior (33%). Of children using the Internet in a way they think their parents would not approve, about half (51%) say their parents found out about this behavior (somewhat lower than the percentage of parents who feel they've identified such behavior which is 69%). According to children, when a parent learns of inappropriate behavior, about two in three (68%) are punished or held accountable, meaning about one in three are not. Parents acknowledge holding their children responsible for their Internet behavior in similar numbers (68%).

Those in grades 6-8 are much more likely to use the Internet in a way their parents would not approve (40%) than younger students (17%) (see Figure 18). While both ages are equally likely to get caught (54% grades 4-5, 50% grades 6-8), older children are almost twice as likely to be held accountable (43% 4-5 graders, 78% 6-8 graders). Interestingly, girls are more likely than boys to get caught using the Internet inappropriately and to be punished for it by their parents. 32 CHILDRENS USAGE STUDY Determine WhetherINTERNET Children Have Been Taught To Use The Internet Safely And If They Have Used The Internet In Ways That Their Parents Would Not Approve Among the ways they use the Internet their parents would not approve of include listening to or downloading music online that has adult words (31%) or watching television programs or movies online that are meant for adults (21%) (see Figure 19). About twice as many parents believe these activates happen (63% music with adult words, 46% programs/movies with adult content) than are reported by children. Small numbers have used a webcam or "Facetime" on their phone to chat with a stranger (15%), posted a photo of themselves online, or included such a photo in a text message (8%) or purchased something online with a credit card without permission from an adult to use the card (6%), all things they acknowledge their parents would not approve of. While parents underestimate how often their children use a webcam or phone app to communicate with strangers (2%), they are identical to what their children say about the percentage posting inappropriate photos (8%) or using a credit card without permission (6%). In all cases, online behavior that parents would not approve of tends to be conducted more by older children: downloading music with adult words (20% 4-5 graders, 42% 6-8 graders), watching adult shows/movies (16% 4-5 graders, 26% 6-8 graders), using a webcam/Facetime with strangers (10% 4-5 graders, 20% 6-8 graders), posting an inappropriate photo (7% 4-5 graders, 8% 6-8 graders) and using a credit card without permission (5% 4-5 graders, 8% 6-8 graders) (see Figure 20). There are no major differences by gender. 33 INTERNET USAGE STUDY Figure CHILDRENS 16: Children Who Have Been

Taught At Home Or School To Use The Internet Safely 100 90 87 88 90 83 84 90 80 Percentage 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Children (a) Base: Q46: Note: **: Parent's Perception (b) 4th & 5th Graders (c) 6th, 7th & 8th Graders (d) Boys (e) Girls (f) All respondents answering: Children (n=170), Parent's Perception (n=171), 4th & 5th Graders (n=82**), 6th, 7th & 8th Graders (n=88**), Boys (n=90**), Girls (n=78**). Have you ever been taught at home or school how to use the Internet safely? Percentages represent a Yes response. Letters indicate statistically significant differences.

Warning, small base. 34 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY 100 90 80 Percentage 70 Figure 17: Whether Children Have Used The Internet In A Way That Their Parents Would Not Approve, If Parents Found Out And Punished Their Child 69 Children (a) 68 68 Parent's Perception (b) 60 51 50 40 29 33 30 20 10 0 Used the Internet in a way that parents would not approve Base: Q47: Base: Q48: Base: Q49: Note: **:

Parents found out about child using the Internet in a way they do not approve (Among children who have used the Internet in way parent would not approve) Gotten in trouble or punished for using the Internet in a way they should not have (Among children whose parents have found out) All respondents answering: Children (n=171), Parent's Perception (n=171). Have you ever used the Internet in a way you think your parents would not approve? Respondents who have used the Internet in a way parents would not approve: Children (n=49**), Parents Perception (n=55**). Have your parents ever found out about you using the Internet in a way they dont approve? Respondents who have been caught using the Internet in a way that their parents do not approve: Children (n=25**), Parent's Perception (n=38**). Have you ever gotten in trouble or punished for using the Internet in a way you should not have? Percentages represent a Yes response. Letters indicate statistically significant differences. Warning, small base. 35 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDYIn A Way That Figure 18: Whether Children Have Used The Internet Their Parents Would Not Approve, If Parents Found Out And Punished Their Child Across Grade And Gender 100 90 4th & 5th Graders (a) 6th, 7th & 8th Graders (b) Boys (c) Girls (d) 80 70 Percentage 70 60 54 60

31 40 20 17 c 50 43 40 50 30 79 78 37 26 a 10 0 Base: Q47: Base: Q48: Base: Q49: Note: **: Used the Internet in a way that parents would not approve Parents found out about child using the Internet in a way they do not approve (Among children who have used the Internet in way parent would not approve) Gotten in trouble or punished for using the Internet in a way they should not have (Among children whose parents have found out)

All children answering: 4th & 5th Graders (n=82**), 6th, 7th & 8th (n=89**), Boys (n=91**), Girls (n=78**). Have you ever used the Internet in a way you think your parents would not approve? Children who have used the Internet in a way parents would not approve: 4th & 5th Graders (n=13**), 6th, 7th & 8th (n=36**), Boys (n=27**), Girls (n=20**). Have your parents ever found out about you using the Internet in a way they dont approve? Children who have been caught using the Internet in a way that their parents do not approve: 4th & 5th Graders (n=7**), 6th, 7th & 8th (n=18**), Boys (n=10**), Girls (n=14**). Have you ever gotten in trouble or punished for using the Internet in a way you should not have? Percentages represent a Yes response. Letters indicate statistically significant differences. Warning, small base. 36 CHILDRENS USAGE STUDY Figure 19: Percent Of Children INTERNET Who Use The Internet In Ways That Their Parents Would Not Approve 100 90 Children (a) 80 63 Percentage 70 a 60 50 40 30 46 a 31 21 20 15

b 2 10 0 Parent's Perception (b) Listen to or download music online that has adult words and that your parents would not approve of 8 8 Used a webcam, or Watch television programs or movies online that are meant something like Facetime on your phone, to chat with for adults and that your a stranger parents would not approve of 6 6 Posted a photo of yourself Purchased something online using a credit card without online, or sent a photo of yourself in a text message, getting permission to use that you don't think your the credit card parents would approve of Base: All respondents answering : Children (n=169-171), Parent's Perception (n=169-171). Q41: Have you ever purchased something online using a credit card without getting permission to use the credit card? Q42-44: Do you ever/Have you ever listen to or download music online that has adult words/ watch television programs or movies online that are meant for adults/ posted a photo of sent a photo of yourself in a text message that your parents would not approve of? Q45: Have you ever used a webcam, or something like Facetime on your phone, to chat with a stranger? Note: Percentages represent a Yes response. Letters indicate statistically significant differences. yourself online or

37 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY 100 Figure 20: Percent Of Children Who Use The Internet In Ways That Their Parents Would Not Approve Across Grade And Gender 90 80 Percentage 70 60 50 40 30 20 42 a 2932 20 4th & 5th Graders (a) 26 26 16 15 2019 10 9 10 0 Listen to or download music online that has adult words and that your parents would not approve of Watch television programs or movies online that are meant for adults and that your parents would not approve of 7 86 10

Used a webcam, or something like Facetime on your phone, to chat with a stranger 5 6th, 7th & 8th Graders (b) 8 9 Boys (c) Girls (d) 4 Posted a photo of yourself online, or sent a photo of yourself in a text message, that you don't think your parents would approve of Purchased something online using a credit card without getting permission to use the credit card Base: All children answering: 4th & 5th Graders (n=80-82**), 6th, 7th & 8th (n=88-89**), Boys (n=89-91**), Girls (n=78**). Q41: Have you ever purchased something online using a credit card without getting permission to use the credit card? Q42-44: Do you ever/Have you ever listen to or download music online that has adult words/ watch television programs or movies online that are meant for adults/ posted a photo of yourself online or sent a photo of yourself in a text message that your parents would not approve of? Q45: Have you ever used a webcam, or something like Facetime on your phone, to chat with a stranger? Note: Percentages represent a Yes response. Letters indicate statistically significant differences. **: Warning, small base. 38 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY Objective 5: Assess The Types Of Websites/ Apps That Children Visit and Their

Activity On Those Websites/Apps 39 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY Assess The Types Of Websites/Apps That Children Visit And Their Activity On Those Websites/Apps Children visit a broad range of types of websites and apps that may be age inappropriate or, worse yet, place them in potentially dangerous situations, even lying about their age to get access: Children visit adult websites although they are more likely to land accidentally on an adult site (37%) than to go to such sites purposely (16%) (see Figure 21). About one in five (20%) have searched for topics meant for adults and almost two-thirds (62%) of those doing so proceeded to those adult-oriented sites. Almost one in three (31%) children have lied about their age to get onto an adult website. Around half or more children have used an online or app videogame to compete against strangers (63%), played a fantasy game where you can assume a character (59%) or played online games that were violent (50%) (see Figure 22). This is similar to the perceptions of parents. Between a fifth and a third have gone to sports fantasy sites (34%) or chat rooms where you can talk to strangers (21%), much higher than the perceptions of parents. Almost a fifth have visited sites with sexual photos or videos (17%), about the perception of parents (12%). Fewer have visited sites that tell you how to cheat on tests (11%), sites where you can purchase weapons or learn how to make weapons (5%), dating sites (5%), gambling sites (4%) and sites where you can purchase alcohol or illegal drugs (1%). Surprisingly, younger and older children are equally likely to play fantasy games where you can assume a character (63% 4-5 graders, 56% 6-8 graders), play games where you compete against strangers (61% 4-5 graders, 66% 6-8 graders) or play violent games (50% 4-5 graders, 50% 6-8 graders) (see Figure 23). There are no statistically significant differences in going to sports fantasy sites (41% 4-5 graders, 28% 6-8 graders), chat rooms with strangers (17% 4-5 graders, 25% 6-8 graders) or sites with sexual photos or videos (14% 4-5 graders, 19% 6-8 graders). Few in either grade range visit cheating instruction sites, sites with weapons, dating sites, gambling sites or alcohol sites. Of these sites, boys are more likely than girls to visit those where you can compete against strangers (73% boys, 51% girls), play violent games (75% boys, 20% girls) and play fantasy sports (49% boys, 18% girls). 40

Assess The Types Of CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGEVisit STUDY Websites/Apps That Children And Their Activity On Those Websites/Apps Children use many social media sites and apps, often ones where they can share information with others including, potentially, strangers: Instagram, Snapchat and Vine are the most popular social media apps used by children in these age ranges. Over half use Instagram and Snapchat, some apparently without their parents awareness (Instagram-60%, 49% parent's perception of their child using this site; Snapchat-51%, 41% parent's perception) (see Figure 24). Over four in ten use Vine (41%, 35% parent's perception). Around a quarter use Facebook (28%, 24% parent's perception), Pinterest (24%, 21% parent's perception) or Twitter (24%, 17% parent's perception). Fewer use Ask.fm (18%, 3% parent's perception), Tumblr (11%, 5% parent's perception), Flickr (4%, 6% parent's perception), Tinder (3%, 2% parent's perception), Tagged (1%, 1% parent's perception), MeetMe (1%, 0% parent's perception) and Meetup (1%, 0% parent's perception). Sixth-eighth graders are more active on each of these sites and apps, but even significant numbers of 4th5th graders use Instagram (50% 4-5 graders, 69% 6-8 graders), Snapchat (42% 4-5 graders, 59% 6-8 graders), Vine (33% 4-5 graders, 48% 6-8 graders) and Facebook (25% 4-5 graders, 32% 6-8 graders) (see Figure 25). Over a quarter of 6-8th graders also use Pinterest (19% 4-5 graders, 29% 6-8 graders), Twitter (15% 4-5 graders, 32% 6-8 graders) and Ask.fm where posts can be anonymous (9% 4-5 graders, 26% 6-8 graders). A few even are on dating or socializing sites/apps: Tinder (4% 4-5 graders, 2% 6-8 graders), Tagged (3% 4-5 graders, 0% 6-8 graders), MeetMe (3% 4-5 graders, 0% 6-8 graders) and Meetup (1% 4-5 graders, 0% 6-8 graders). Most children post on these various sites (62%) rather than just viewing other people's posts, more than the percentage of parents who think their children are posting (52%) (see Figure 26). Posting is more prevalent among older students, but significant numbers of younger ones do as well (44% 45 graders, 79% 6-8 graders). There is no statistically significant difference on posting between boys and girls. 41

Assess The Types Of CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY Websites/Apps That Children Visit And Their Activity On Those Websites/Apps Over a fifth of children (22%) have their own Facebook page, similar to the perception of parents (19%) (see Figure 27). Having a Facebook page (there is a minimum age requirement of 13 to set up one's own page) is much more common among 6-8 graders (30%) than 4-5 graders (13%). There is no difference by gender. All children (100%) with a Facebook page say their parents know they have their own page (see Figure 28). However, only 41 percent of parents helped their child set up their page. Occasionally they got help from a sibling or friend (13%). While some are 13 or older and could set up their page themselves (16%), almost one out of three (30%) lied about their age and said they were at least 13 so they could create their own account. Parental supervision of Facebook usage is sporadic. Over one in three children (35%) say their parents never look at what they do on Facebook and a similar amount (30%) say they do so some of the time. Few monitor their child's Facebook use most of the time (13%) or always (22%). 42 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY 100 Figure 21: Whether Children Have Searched For Or Visited Adult Websites Or Topics And If They Have Lied To Get Onto The Sites 90 80 62 Percentage 70 60 50 40

37 30 31 16 20 20 10 0 Accidentally gone to websites that are meant for adults and not children Base: Q35/36: Q37: Base: Q38: Base: Q40: Note: **: On purpose gone to websites that are meant for adults and not children Ever done a search on the Internet for topics that are meant for adults and not children After searching, ever gone to sites that are meant for adults and not children (Among those who have done a search for adult topics) Ever lied about your age to get onto an adult website All children answering (n=170-171). Have you ever accidentally/on purpose gone to any websites that are meant for adults and not children? Do you ever do a search on the Internet for topics that are meant for adults and not children? Children who have done a search on the Internet for topics that are meant for adults and not children (n=34**). After searching, do you ever go to sites that are meant for adults and not children? All children answering (n=171). Have you ever lied about your age to get onto an adult website? Percentages represent a Yes response. Warning, small base.

43 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY Figure 22: Types Of Websites That Children Visit 100 90 80 Percentage 70 60 63 56 59 b 47 50 30 Children (a) 18 20 21 Parent's Perception (b) b 17 7 10 Base: Q39: Note: 50 34 b 40

0 50 Games where you can compete against strangers Fantasy games where you can be a certain character 12 11b 5 Games Sports fantasy Chat rooms Sites with Cheating sites (like where you sexual photos instruction that are fantasy can talk to violent sites for or videos baseball or strangers tests/ meant for football) schoolwork adults 5 1 Sites where you can purchase weapons or learn how to make weapons 5b

1 Dating sites 42 Sites where you can gamble 1 1 Alcohol purchasing or illegal drug related websites All respondents answering : Children (n=169-170), Parent's Perception (n=168-171). Have you ever gone to any of the following types of websites: Percentages represent a Yes response. Letters indicate statistically significant differences. 44 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY Figure 23: Types Of Websites Children Visit Across Grade And Gender 100 90 73 80 Percentage 70 60 63 56 62 55 61 75 d

d 4th & 5th Graders (a) 6th, 7th & 8th Graders (b) Boys (c) Girls (d) 66 51 50 50 49 d 50 41 40 28 30 20 25 26 18 20 17 14 14 19 18 16 10 0 Base: Q39: Note: **:

Fantasy games where you can be a certain character Games where you can compete against strangers Games that are violent Sports fantasy team sites (like fantasy baseball or football) Chat rooms where you can talk to strangers Sites with sexual photos or videos meant for adults All children answering: 4th & 5th Graders (n=81-82**), 6th, 7th & 8th (n=88**), Boys (n=90-91**), Girls (n=77**). Have you ever gone to any of the following types of websites: Percentages represent a Yes response. Letters indicate statistically significant differences. Warning, small base. (Continued on next page) 45 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY 100 Figure 23: Types Of Websites Children Visit Across Grade And Gender (Contd) 90 80 70 Percentage 60 50 4th & 5th Graders (a) 6th, 7th & 8th Graders (b) Boys (c)

Girls (d) 40 30 20 10 9 14 11 12 5 5 8 1 3 7 3 7 1 7 4 4 0 Cheating instruction sites for tests/ schoolwork Base: Q39: Note: **: Sites where you can purchase weapons or learn how to make weapons Dating sites Sites where you can gamble 1 1 0

0 Alcohol purchasing or illegal drug related websites All children answering: 4th & 5th Graders (n=81-82**), 6th, 7th & 8th (n=88**), Boys (n=90-91**), Girls (n=77**). Have you ever gone to any of the following types of websites: Percentages represent a Yes response. Letters indicate statistically significant differences. Warning, small base. 46 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY Figure 24: Specific Social Media Websites And Apps That Children Use 100 90 80 78 70 70 60 Children (a) b Percentage 60 50 49 51 41 41 35 40 28 24 24 21 24 17 18b

30 20 10 0 Base: Q14: Note: Parent's Perception (b) 11b 3 Any (Net) Instagram Snapchat Vine Facebook Pinterest Twitter Ask.fm 5 Tumblr 46 Flickr 32 Tinder 1 1 Tagged 1 1 MeetMe 0 Meetup 0 All respondents answering : Children (n=166-171), Parent's Perception (n=168-171). Do you use: Percentages represent a Yes response. Letters indicate statistically significant differences. 47

CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY 100 90 87a 80 Percentage 70 68 Figure 25: Specific Social Media Websites And Apps That Children Use Across Grade 69a 59a 60 50 50 4th & 5th Graders (a) 48 6th, 7th & 8th Graders (b) 42 40 33 30 32 25 19 20 32 a 29 26a 15

14 9 10 9 5 3 4 2 Flickr Tinder 3 3 1 0 Any (Net) Instagram Snapchat Base: Q14: Note: **: Vine Facebook Pinterest Twitter Ask.fm Tumblr 0 Tagged 0 MeetMe 0 Meetup All children answering : 4th & 5th Graders (n=79-82**), 6th, 7th & 8th Graders (n=87-89**). Do you use: Percentages represent a Yes response. Letters indicate statistically significant differences. Warning, small base.

48 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY Figure 26: Percentage Of Children Who Have Posted On Any Social Media Websites Or Apps Across Subgroups 100 90 79c 80 Percentage 70 62 68 b 60 57 52 44 50 40 30 20 10 0 Children (a) Base: Q15: Note: Parent's Perception (b) 4th & 5th Graders (c)

6th, 7th & 8th Graders (d) Boys (e) Girls (f) All respondents answering: Children (n=170), Parent's Perception (n=171), 4th & 5th Graders (n=81**), 6th, 7th & 8th Graders (n=89**), Boys (n=91**), Girls (n=77**). Do you ever post on any of the sites or apps in question 14 above? Percentages represent a Yes response. Letters indicate statistically significant differences. 49 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY Figure 27: Children Who Have Their Own Facebook Page Across Subgroups 100 90 80 Percentage 70 60 50 40 30 22 30 19 20 c 24 13 21 10 0 Base: Q31: Note: **:

Children (a) Parent's Perception (b) 4th & 5th Graders (c) 6th, 7th & 8th Graders (d) Boys (e) Girls (f) All respondents answering: Children (n=169), Parent's Perception (n=171), 4th & 5th Graders (n=80**), 6th, 7th & 8th Graders (n=89**), Boys (n=89**), Girls (n=78**). Do you have your own Facebook page? Percentages represent a Yes response. Letters indicate statistically significant differences. Warning, small base. 50 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY 100 100 Figure 28: Childrens Behavior When Using Facebook 90 80 Percentage 70 60 Who Set Up Facebook Page 50 Parent Oversight of Facebook Page 40.5 40 30 30 22

30 13 20 35 16.2 13 10 0 Parents know child has a Facebook page Parent Brother, sister or friend Yourself and they are 13 or over Yourself and said they were older than they are Parents Parents always look at most of the what you do time look at what you do Base: Q32: Q33: Q34: Note: **: Parents Parents never

some of the look at what time look at you do what you do Children who have their own Facebook page (n=37**). Do your parents know you have your own Facebook page? When you set up your own Facebook page did you: Which is usually true when you use your Facebook page: Percentages represent a Yes response. Warning, small base. 51 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY Objective 6: Determine Childrens Online Interaction With Strangers 52 CHILDRENSChildrens INTERNETOnline USAGE STUDY With Determine Interaction Strangers Many children have friended strangers online, sometimes lying about their age to them or giving out personal information, but rarely meeting with the stranger in person: Four out of ten (40%) say they have "friended" or connected with someone they didn't know on a site or app, many more than their parents' perception of this behavior (23%) (see Figure 29). Friending strangers is more prevalent among older students (33% 4-5 graders, 47% 6-8 graders), but significant numbers of younger ones do it as well. There is no statistically significant difference on this activity between boys and girls. Four in ten children (40%) say they have chatted online with someone they don't know, higher than the perception of parents (28%) (see Figure 30). The practice is done by both 4-5 graders (32%) and 6-8 graders (47%) as well as boys (42%) and girls (36%). After chatting online with a stranger, some have gone further and chatted with the stranger via

text on their cell phone (30%) or voice on their cell phone (21%) (see Figure 31). Of those chatting with strangers online, 45 percent told the stranger they are older than they are, 10 percent said they were an adult, 25 percent gave the stranger their phone number and 6 percent gave the stranger their address. Fifteen percent of those who chatted with a stranger online tried to meet the person and 11 percent actually did so. When rebased back to all children (not just those chatting with a stranger), these data show that 12 percent of kids spoke to a stranger by text and 8 percent by voice; 18 percent told a stranger they are older than they are and 4 percent said they were an adult; 10 percent told the stranger their phone number and 2 percent their address; 6 percent tried to meet the stranger and 4 percent actually met them (see Figure 32). 53 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY Determine Childrens Online Interaction With Strangers All of these activities happen at least somewhat more frequently among older children (again based back to the total sample) (see Figure 33). For example, those in grade 6-8 are slightly more likely to text a stranger (7% 4-5 graders, 16% 6-8 graders), speak to a stranger on a phone (5% 4-5 graders, 11% 6-8 graders), try to meet a stranger (1% 4-5 graders, 10% 6-8 graders) and actually meet a stranger (1% 4-5 graders, 7% 6-8 graders). They are more likely to tell a stranger they are older than they are (15% 4-5 graders, 20% 6-8 graders) or that they are an adult (4% 4-5 graders, 5% 6-8 graders). They are also more likely to give out their phone number (5% 4-5 graders, 15% 6-8 graders) or address (1% 4-5 graders, 3% 6-8 graders). There are few differences by gender. Since only 7 children actually met a stranger, statistics shouldn't be used to show how that interaction was handled. But raw counts can be shown (see Table 1). All 7 children met with someone their own age. Only one met the stranger alone, with others bringing a parent (2), an older sibling (3), someone their own age (4) or someone else (2). They typically met in a public place like a park (6) or a fast food restaurant (1), but a few met at their home (2) or the stranger's home (1). In one instance, a child said the stranger did or said something that was inappropriate. These numbers sometimes add to more than 7 because children may have taken more than one person to a meet up or met with strangers more than one time. 54 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY 100 90

80 Figure 29: Percentage Of Children Who Have Friended Or Connected With A Stranger On Any Sites Or Apps Across Subgroups Percentage 70 60 50 40 47 b 33 40 30 37 42 23 20 10 0 Children (a) Base: Q16: Note: Parent's Perception (b) 4th & 5th Graders (c) 6th, 7th & 8th Graders (d) Boys (e) Girls (f) All respondents answering: Children (n=171), Parent's Perception (n=171), 4th & 5th Graders (n=82**), 6th, 7th & 8th Graders (n=89**), Boys (n=91**), Girls (n=78**). On any of the sites or apps in question 14 above, have you ever friended or connected with someone you dont know, that is, with a stranger? Percentages represent a Yes response.

Letters indicate statistically significant differences. 55 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY 100 Figure 30: Percentage Of Children Who Have Chatted Online With Someone They Dont Know Across Subgroups 90 80 Percentage 70 60 50 40 47 c b 40 28 30 42 32 36 20 10 0 Children (a) Base: Q17: Note: **: Parent's Perception (b) 4th & 5th Graders (c)

6th, 7th & 8th Graders (d) Boys (e) Girls (f) All respondents answering: Children (n=171), Parent's Perception (n=170), 4th & 5th Graders (n=82**), 6th, 7th & 8th Graders (n=89**), Boys (n=91**), Girls (n=78**). Have you ever chatted online with someone you dont know? Percentages represent a Yes response. Letters indicate statistically significant differences. Warning, small base. 56 CHILDRENS INTERNET STUDY Figure 31: Childrens Online USAGE Interaction With Strangers (Among Children Who Have Chatted Online With A Stranger) 100 90 80 Percentage 70 60 45 50 40 30 30 25 21 10 20 6 10 0

Texted a stranger from their phone Base: Q18-21: Base: Q22-25: Note: **: Spoken to a stranger on the phone Told stranger they are older than they really are Told stranger that they were an adult Told a stranger their phone number Told a stranger their home address 15 Tried to meet with a stranger 11 Met up with a stranger Children who have chatted online with someone they dont know (n=67**). Have you ever told someone you dont know when chatting online that you are older than you really are/ are an adult / your home address / your phone number? Children who have chatted online with someone they dont know (n=64-67**). After chatting with someone on the Internet you dont know, have you ever texted any of those people from your phone/ spoken to any of those people on the phone/ tried to meet with any of those people/ actually met up with any of those people? Percentages represent a Yes response. Warning, small base. 57 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY Figure 32: Childrens Online Interaction With Strangers

(Overall Sample) 100 90 80 Percentage 70 60 50 40 30 20 12 10 0 Base: Q18-21: Base: Q22-25: Note: Texted a stranger from their phone 8 Spoken to a stranger on the phone 18 4 Told stranger they are older than they really are Told stranger that they were an adult 10 Told a stranger their phone number 2 Told a stranger their home address

6 Tried to meet with a stranger 4 Met up with a stranger All children (n=170). Have you ever told someone you dont know when chatting online that you are older than you really are/ are an adult / your home address/ your phone number? All children (n=166-170). After chatting with someone on the Internet you dont know, have you ever texted any of those people from your phone/ spoken to any of those people on the phone/ tried to meet with any of those people/ actually met up with any of those people? Percentages represent a Yes response. 58 CHILDRENS INTERNETWith USAGE STUDYAcross Grade And Figure 33: Childrens Online Interaction Strangers Gender (Overall Sample) 100 4th & 5th Graders (a) 90 6th, 7th & 8th Graders (b) Boys (c) Girls (d) 80 Percentage 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 16 13 7 9 Texted a stranger from their phone

5 11 89 Spoken to a stranger on the phone 2020 15 14 4 Told stranger they are older than they really are 56 15a 3 5 9 10 Told stranger that Told a stranger they were an adult their phone number 1 3 1 4 Told a stranger their home address 10 a 46 1 Tried to meet with a stranger 1

7 8c 1 Met up with a stranger Base: All children: 4th & 5th Graders (n=82**), 6th, 7th & 8th Graders (n=89**), Boys (n=91**), Girls (n=78**). Q18-21: Have you ever told someone you dont know when chatting online that you are older than you really are/ are an adult / your home address/ your phone number? Base: All children: 4th & 5th Graders (n=81-82**), 6th, 7th & 8th Graders (n=86-89**), Boys (n=89-91**), Girls (n=76-78**). Q22-25: After chatting with someone on the Internet you dont know, have you ever texted any of those people from your phone/ spoken to any of those people on the phone/ tried to meet with people/ actually met up with any of those people? Note: Percentages represent a Yes response. any of those 59 CHILDRENS INTERNETWith USAGE STUDY Table 1: Online Interaction Strangers Among Children Who Have Met In Person With Someone They Dont Know COUNT Age Of Strangers That Children Met Up With Someone their age A student several years older than them An adult Who Children Took With Them To Meet With Strangers* By him/herself T ook a friend that is his/her age T ook an older brother or sister T ook a parent T ook someone else Locations Where Children Met With Strangers* T heir home T he stranger's home A restaurant or fast food restaurant A public place like a park or mall Behavior When Children Met With Stranger Stranger did or said something that was inappropriate Base:

Q26: Q28: Q29: Q27/30: Note: *: **: (n=7**) 7 0 0 (n=6-7**) 1 4 3 2 2 (n=7**) 2 1 1 6 (n=7**) 1 Children who have met in person with someone that they didnt know (n=6-7**). When you met in person with someone from the Internet that you didnt know, was the person you met with: When you met in person with someone from the Internet that you didnt know, did you ever: When you met in person with someone from the Internet that you didnt know, did you ever meet: When you met in person with someone from the Internet that you didnt know, did you ever go by yourself/ did they say or do anything that you thought was inappropriate? For Q27/30 percentages represent a Yes response. Answers may add to more than the total number of people answering because more than one response was accepted. Warning, small base. 60 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY Appendix A: Respondent Profile A-1 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY Respondent Profile Gender Boy Girl Other Grade level

4th 5th 6th 7th 8th Age Mean 9 yrs old 10 yrs old 11 yrs old 12 yrs old 13 yrs old 14 yrs old 15 yrs old Hispanic/ Latino (Parent* ) Yes No Race/ ethnicity (Parent* ) White African - American Asian American Mixed race or cultures Something else Note: Total (n=171) 53% 46% 1% (n=171) 22% 26% 19% 18% 15% (n=171) 11.6 3% 23% 23% 22% 17% 10% 2% (n=171) 5% 95% (n=167) 68% 25% 2%

3% 2% Children were also asked about ethnicity and race. Some were uncertain of how to answer. Therefore, parent data is reported here The race/ethnicity of the child in some cases will be different. A-2 CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY Respondent Profile English language spoken most often in home Yes No School type Public school Private school Homeschool Some other type of school Neighborhood type Urban area Suburban area Rural area Annual household income Mean Less than $25,000 $25,000 to $49,999 $50,000 to $74,999 $75,000 to $99,999 $100,000 to $149,999 $150,000 to $199,999 $200,000 or more Prefer not to answer Total (n=171) 98% 2% (n=171) 63% 29% 7% 1% (n=171) 29% 68% 3% (n=171) 117.1 5% 12% 16% 24%

22% 9% 8% 4% A-3 Keep Children Safe In Todays Cyber World CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY www.SafeAndSecureOnline. org CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY About Center for Cyber Safety and Education: Center for Cyber Safety and Education, formerly (ISC) Foundation, is a non-profit charity formed by (ISC) in 2011 as a means to reach the general public and empower students, parents, teachers and members of society across all age groups and demographics to secure their online life with cybersecurity education and awareness programs. The Center was formed to meet this goal through the Safe and Secure Online educational program, the Information Security Scholarship Program, and Industry and Consumer Research - the three core programs of the Center. Visit www.isc2cares.org About (ISC): (ISC) is the largest not-for-profit membership body of certified cyber, information, software and infrastructure security professionals worldwide, with over 110,000 members in more than 160 countries. Globally recognized as the Gold Standard, (ISC) issues the Certified Authorization Professional (CAP ), Certified Cyber Forensics Professional (CCFP), Certified Cloud Security Professional (CCSPSM), Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) and related concentrations, Certified Secure Software Lifecycle Professional (CSSLP), HealthCare Information Security and Privacy Practitioner (HCISPP) and Systems Security Certified Practitioner (SSCP) credentials to qualifying candidates. (ISC) offers education programs and services based on its CBK. Visit www.isc2.org. About Booz Allen Hamilton: Booz Allen Hamilton (NYSE: BAH) has been at the forefront of strategy and technology for more than 100 years. Today, the firm provides management and technology consulting and engineering services to leading Fortune 500 corporations, governments, and not-for-profits across the globe. Booz Allen partners with public and private sector clients to solve their most difficult challenges through a combination of consulting, analytics, mission operations, technology, systems delivery, cybersecurity, engineering, and innovation expertise. With international headquarters in McLean, Virginia, the firm employs about 22,600 people globally. Visit www.boozallen.com CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY CHILDRENS INTERNET USAGE STUDY (GRADES 4-8) MADE POSSIBLE Released THROUGH AprilTHE 4, PARTNERSHIPS 2016 OF

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    LD defined and the areas of impact. Understanding LD. In this section, we will define "learning disability," see some of the processes that are impacted by learning disabilities, and talk about what a LD is NOT.
  • EVOLUTION - Ms. Abbas AP Biology

    EVOLUTION - Ms. Abbas AP Biology

    Evolution is known as "the unifying theory of biology" ... As we cover evolution I will try to address particular questions, concerns and arguments. Media: PBS Evolution - many resources covering the topic - videos, articles, activities and more.
  • Drinking Water Rules - What's new

    Drinking Water Rules - What's new

    Directed Assistance Module (DAM) 8:Nitrification Action Plans (NAPs) Developed by the TCEQ. Water Supply Division (WSD) Texas Optimization Program (TOP)