2010-11 MPS Corrective Action Requirements

2010-11 MPS Corrective Action Requirements

Exploring CCR IEP Revised Sample Forms: Going Back to Move Forward College and Career Ready IEPs: Improving Outcomes for Students Ages 3 through 21 August 2016 1 Goals for Today Today you will walk away with . . . Understanding the shift from IEPs to CCR IEPs

Understanding the revised sample IEP forms Understanding the 5 Beliefs and 5 Step Process Equipped with resources and strategies Feeling empowered and supported

August 2016 2 What is RDA? New Federal Emphasis on Outcomes for Students with Disabilities: Results Driven Accountability (RDA) New Wisconsin Emphasis on Outcomes for Students with Disabilities: Reading Drives Achievement: Success through Literacy (RDA) August 2016

3 Reading Drives Achievement: Success through Literacy August 2016 4 Why All the Changes? Achievement gap between students with IEPs and students without IEPs In 2015, approximately 20% of students with IEPs are performing at or above proficiency in reading

Focus on procedural compliance has not resulted in better outcomes August 2016 5 Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) that Meets the unique needs of the student and

Prepares the student for: Further education, Employment, and Independent living August 2016 6 Guidance from U.S. Department of Education Primary Vehicle for Providing FAPE Individualized Education Program (IEP) Appropriately developed and

implemented Adapted from U.S. Department of Education Dear Colleague Letter, November 16, 2015: OSERS Policy Guidance on Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) August 2016 7 Guidance from U.S. Department of Education Appropriately developed IEP takes into account . . . The students present levels of academic achievement and functional performance Impact of the students disability on his or her involvement and progress in the

general education curriculum Adapted from U.S. Department of Education Dear Colleague Letter, November 16, 2015: OSERS Policy Guidance on Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) August 2016 8 Guidance from U.S. Department of Education IEP goals must be . . . Aligned with grade-level academic content standards Ambitious and achievable Adapted from U.S. Department of Education Dear Colleague Letter, November 16, 2015: OSERS Policy Guidance on Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE)

August 2016 9 Guidance from U.S. Department of Education Ensuring that all children, including children with disabilities, are held to rigorous academic standards and high expectations is a shared responsibility for all of us. Adapted from U.S. Department of Education Dear Colleague Letter, November 16, 2015: OSERS Policy Guidance on Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) August 2016

10 Agenda 2017 Every Child a Graduate, College and Career Ready August 2016 11 What does College and Career Ready Really Mean? All students graduate from high school academically prepared and socially emotionally competent by possessing and demonstrating . . .

Knowledge (Academic) Proficient in academic content Skills (Functional) Critical thinking, communication, collaboration, creativity, community Habits (Self-Determination) Perseverance, responsibility, adaptability, leadership August 2016 12 CCR IEPs, Alignment, and Focus August 2016

13 Students with IEPs College and Career Ready How can we help students with IEPs graduate college and career ready? How can the IEP be used to help students graduate college and career ready? August 2016 14

What is a CCR IEP? CCR IEP = College and Career Ready IEP An Individualized Education Program (IEP) developed to meet the unique disability-related needs of the student and help ensure the student graduates ready for further education and the workplace College and Career Ready IEPs are in alignment with the guidance from the August 2016 15 CCR IEPs Promote

Higher expectations for students; ambitious but achievable IEP goals Greater access, involvement, and progress in universal instruction, school activities, and school community Resiliency and self-determination that supports independence in the community for life after high school More students graduating with regular diploma and the skills needed for college and career readiness August 2016 16 CCR IEPs Promote

Alignment with required student plans: Academic Career Plan (fall 2017) Postsecondary Transition Plan Alignment with best practice supports: Response to Intervention Wisconsin Mental Health Framework Trauma Sensitive Schools Current research and best practice August 2016 17 Where is Your IEP Team, School, District Currently?

College and Career Ready IEPs require IEP teams to consider the following . . . What are the attitudes and beliefs of IEP team members about college and career readiness for students with IEPs? What knowledge and skills does each IEP team member possess to support students with IEPs and other IEP team members? What systems, policies, procedures, and practices are in place to promote CCR IEPs? August 2016 18 Where is Your IEP Team, School, District Currently?

College and Career Ready IEPs Require IEP teams to consider the following . . . What are the attitudes and beliefs of IEP team members about college and career readiness for students with IEPs? What knowledge and skills does each IEP team member possess to support students with IEPs and other IEP team members? What systems, policies, procedures and practices are in place to promote CCR IEPs? August 2016 19 CCR IEP 5 Beliefs High Expectations

Culturally Responsive Practices Student Relationships Family and Community Engagement Collective Responsibility August 2016 20 Belief 1: High Expectations for College, Career, and Community IEP teams know how high expectations influence academic achievement and post-secondary independence and explore a shared vision of high

expectations for college, career, and community readiness August 2016 21 Belief 1: High Expectations for College, Career, and Community High expectations for students could mean . . . Meeting grade-level standards and expectations Graduating with a regular diploma and ready for postsecondary education Having positive relationships with adults and peers Excelling in extra-curricular and nonacademic activities

Working in the community side by side with others Functioning as independent adults after high school Being a productive, contributing citizen August 2016 22 High Expectations for College, Career, and Community High Expectations for Supports Could Mean . . . Giving students what they need to be independent adults Removing barriers to accessing grade level standards and instruction

Building relationships and creating safe environments for learning Giving the same opportunities as others Supporting students to be independent as possible Knowing how opportunities for people with disabilities has changed greatly over time August 2016 23 Belief 2: Culturally Responsive Practices Changing our Views about Fair IEP teams know and respect the unique identity of the student and explore programs, practices, procedures, and

policies that meet the diversity of the students abilities, race, gender, language, and culture August 2016 24 2014-15 English Language Arts Proficiency for Students with IEPs by Race/Ethnicity August 2016 25 Belief 2: Culturally Responsive Practices

Changing our Views about Fair No Barriers 26 August 2016 Adapted from Center for Story Based Strategy and Interaction Institute for Social Change Belief 3: Student Relationships are Necessary to Support Growth IEP teams know the value of relationships that are necessary for learning and explore strategies that will build relationships between the student,

peers, and adults August 2016 27 Belief 3: Student Relationships are Necessary to Support Growth Knowledge, Skills, and Habits to be College and Career Ready Relationships to Feel Belonging Academic Skills to be

Successful in School and Beyond Social and Emotional Skills to Build Relationships with Others Life Skills to be Healthy and Independent Organizational Skills to Plan and Meet Goals Feeling Accepted August 2016 Having Your Emotions and Feelings Validated

Having Interests and Opinions Respected Knowing Someone Cares how You and Your Family are Doing 28 Belief 4: Family and Community Engagement IEP teams know how new ways of rethinking family engagement can improve student outcomes and explore how the school can support the families hopes, perspectives, culture, insights, and concerns for their child Wisconsin

29 August 2016State Superintendent's Parent Advisory Council Belief Statement Belief 4: Family and Community Engagement We believe all parents want their children to learn and to succeed in school. Families are a source of strength and knowledge. Families are best able to help their children do well in school when schools accept families as they are and make frequent efforts to know, listen to, and learn from parents. Wisconsin State Superintendent's Parent Advisory Council Belief Statement August 2016

30 Belief 5: Collective Responsibility IEP team members know the power of working together and explore how each and every member can support the student in accessing grade level universal instruction to achieve academic standards and functional expectations Wisconsin State Superintendent's Parent Advisory Council Belief Statement August 2016 31

Belief 5: Collective Responsibility Communicatio Collaboratio n n IEP Information Shared with Caregivers in Home and School Strategies, Instruction, Curriculum, Supports Student Success and

Needs across August 2016 Service Delivery Shared Planning and Meeting Time Intentional and Based Students Strengths and Needs

Implementing Supports, Accommodations , and Modifications Promotes Access to Grade Level Instruction, School Community and Activities Shared Reflection of Shared Delivery of

District Standards 32 Belief 5: Collective Responsibility LEAs may use reading teachers (1316 licensed) to provide the specially designed literacy Instruction outlined in a students IEP IDEA flow-through or preschool funds may be used to fund the portion of time that is used to provide this specially designed instruction April 6, 2016, Memo from Carolyn Stanford-Taylor, Assistant State

33 Group Activity Look at the CCR IEP 5 beliefs one page document Watch video and look for connections in Megans speech August 2016 34 Megan Bomgaars: Dont Limit Me Group Activity

Look at the CCR IEP 5 beliefs one page document What connections did you see in Megans speech? August 2016 36 CCR IEP 5 Beliefs Want to know more? Future modules on 5 beliefs available winter 2017 August 2016

37 Improved Student Outcomes Discussion Tool August 2016 38 RDA: PCSA and Sample IEP Forms Items on the RDA:PCSA were updated to focus on student outcomes

Sample IEP forms were revised to align with new RDA: PCSA Both focus on improving literacy / reading outcomes for students with IEPs Both promote linkages across the entire IEP process (strengths and needs, goals, IEP services) August 2016 39 Revised Sample IEP Forms The revised sample forms do not add any additional legal requirements Added sections and prompts promote focus on and discussion during the development of an IEP to help

ensure: + IEP is compliant + IEP is effective in identifying and addressing needs + Clear linkages between the needs of the student, the goals and services = Improved student outcomes The revised forms align with the results driven accountability efforts and focus on reading drives achievement 40 August 2016 Revised Sample IEP Forms Stand Alone Revisions Referral Form (R-1)

IEP Team Meeting Cover Sheet (I-3) Existing Data Review (EW-1 is now ED-1) Evaluation Report (ER-1) August 2016 41 Revised Sample IEP Forms Combined Revisions Present Levels (I-4) Special Factors (I-5) Annual Goals (I-6) Program Summary (I-9) are Now . . . IEP Linking Form (I-4)

August 2016 42 Revised Sample IEP Forms New Review of IEP Goal Forms Annual IEP Goal Review (I-5) Interim IEP Goal Review (I-6) August 2016 43 Benefits of Adopting Revised Sample IEP Forms IEPs that promote improved student

outcomes by addressing the disability-related needs IEPs that connect the students needs with goals and services Greater family engagement in IEP development IEPs aligned with the New RDA: PCSA Checklist August 2016 44 Positive Feedback on Revised IEP Forms Quotes from pilot districts . . . Helps focus the [IEP] discussion on reading

Text boxes throughout with additional information and guidance are a nice touch and necessary Before developing annual goals, review previous great idea. August 2016 45 Positive Feedback on Revised Sample IEP Forms Quotes from pilot districts . . . Cohesiveness of the Linking Form flows well Linkages: needs, goals, services

Includes concerns of the student Great to have a question about family engagement given how family engagement can improve literacy achievement August 2016 46 Revised Sample IEP Forms Two documents on the DPI website provide information about the sample IEP forms: Highlights of RDA Changes to Sample Forms A one-page overview of the revisions and rationale Detailed Explanation of RDA Changes

to Sample Forms A four-page chart that details the revisions 47 August 2016 and reasons for the revisions Revised Sample IEP Forms Stand Alone Revisions Referral Form (R-1) IEP Team Meeting Cover Sheet (I-3) Review of Existing Data (EW-1 is now ED-1) Evaluation Report (ER-1) August 2016 48

Revised Referral Form (R-1) August 2016 49 Revised Cover Page (I-3) August 2016 50 Revised Review of Existing Data (EW1) Now: Existing Data Review (ED-1)

51 Revised Evaluation Report (ER-1) 52 Revised Evaluation Report (ER1) Need for Special Education 53 College and Career Ready IEP 5 Step Process August 2016

54 IEP Linking Form (I-4) Combined Revisions Present Levels (I-4) Special Factors (I-5) Annual Goals (I-6) Program Summary (I-9) are Now . . . IEP Linking Form (I-4) August 2016 55 College and Career Ready IEP 5 Step Process

First Then Next Ongoin g August 2016 Understand achievement of grade-level academic standards and functional expectations to identify the students strengths and needs Identify how the students disability affects academic achievement and functional performance Develop ambitious and achievable goals that close achievement gaps and support

the unique strengths and needs of the student Align specially designed instruction, services, supports, and accommodations needed to support the goals and ensure access to the general curriculum Analyze progress towards goals to evaluate what works and what is needed to close the students achievement gaps 56 College and Career Ready IEP 5 Step Process Understand achievement of grade-level Understand achievement of

academic standards and functional grade-level academic standards expectations to identify the students and functional expectations to strengths and needs. identify the students strengths andIdentify needs how the students disability affects academic achievement and functional performance. Analyze progress towards Identify how the students Develop ambitious but achievable goals

goals to evaluate what works disability affects academic that close achievement gaps and support and what is needed to close achievement andneeds functional the unique strengths and of the the students achievement performance student. gaps

First Then Next Align specially designed instruction, services, supports, and accommodations needed to support the goals and ensure access to the general curriculum Ongoin g

August 2016 Align specially designed instruction, services, supports, and accommodations needed to support the goals and ensure Develop ambitious and access to thegoals general achievable thatcurriculum.

close achievement gaps and support progress the unique strengths Analyze towards goals to and needs of the evaluate what works andstudent what is needed to

close the students achievement gaps. 57 College and Career Ready IEP 5 Step Process Understand achievement of grade-level academic standards and functional expectations to identify the students strengths and needs. Analyze progress towards goals to evaluate what works and what is needed to close the students achievement gaps Align specially designed

instruction, services, supports, and accommodations needed to support the goals and ensure access to the general curriculum August 2016 Identify how the students disability affects academic achievement and functional performance Develop ambitious and achievable goals that close achievement gaps and

support the unique strengths and needs of the student 58 College and Career Ready IEP 5 Step Process Understand Achievement Analyze Progress Align Services August 2016 Identify Effects of Disability

Develop Goals 59 Group Activity CCR IEP 5 Step Process Using your CCR IEP 5 step cards . . . Put the cards in the 5 step order Discussion In what order or arrangement did you put the five steps? What are the benefits to students when IEP teams follow this 5 step process? How would outcomes for students change if the steps are done in a different order? August 2016

60 Breaking Down the CCR IEP 5 Step Process August 2016 61 Step 1: Understand Achievement to Identify Strengths and Needs Understand Achievement Analyze Progress

Align Services August 2016 Identify Effects of Disability Develop Goals 62 Step 1: Understand Achievement to Identify Strengths and Needs Understand achievement of

grade-level academic standards and functional expectations to identify the students strengths and needs. August 2016 63 Step 1: Understand Achievement to Identify Strengths and Needs This step covers the following IEP linking form sub sections . . . Strengths Current Academic Achievement Functional Performance

August 2016 64 Step 1: Understand Achievement to Identify Strengths and Needs Identify and discuss academic content standards and functional expectations for the grade the student is enrolled Based on data, assessments, and other information, discuss students current level of achievement in relation to grade-level content standards and functional expectations

This is baseline information August 2016 65 Individualized Education Program (I-4) Linking Present Levels, Needs, Goals & Services 66 Student Strengths in IEP Move Away From . . . David has a great sense of humor!

Towards . . . How do we use Davids great sense of humor, which comes out at home and is valued in his Bad River Community, to improve his access, involvement, and progress in grade level instruction? Example When given an opportunity to tell a humorous story to the class, David will be able to retell the story he has read with all events in the correct order in678 out of IEP Linking Form (I-4) 68 Step 1 Group Activity

Examples of Strengths and Present Levels Related to Grade-Level Standards Think of a student with an IEP What information would you expect to see in Present Levels Name Examples of . . . Strengths in relation to independence, resiliency, and self-determination Student academic achievement in relation to grade-level standards Student functional expectations in relation to

grade-level expectations August 2016 69 Step 2: Identify Effects of Disability on Access and Achievement Understand Achievement Analyze Progress Align Services August 2016

Identify Effects of Disability Develop Goals 70 Step 2: Identify Effects of Disability on Access and Achievement Identify how the students disability affects academic achievement and

functional performance August 2016 71 Step 2: Identify Effects of Disability on Access and Achievement This step covers the following IEP linking form sub sections . . . Special Factors Concerns of Parent, Family, and Student Effects of Disability Disability-Related Needs

Family Engagement Participation in General Education Curriculum August 2016 72 Special Factors 73 Concerns of the Parents/Family 74 Individualized Education Program

(I-4) Disability-Related Needs 75 Step 2: Identify Effects of Disability on Access and Achievement Identify and discuss: Special factors Concerns of the parent, family, and student Effects of disability

Consider the impact on access, involvement, and progress in the general education curriculum, academic achievement and functional performance August 2016 76 Step 2: Identify Effects of Disability on Access and Achievement After identifying what are the students present levels compared to grade level peers . . . Identify why the student is performing

at, above, or below grade level The IEP team documents the Effects of Disability and Disability-Related Needs in the IEP 77 Effects of Disability Describes the result (effect) of the students disability on access, involvement, and progress in general education Difficulty understanding written instructions in all content areas

During math class, (student) is easily frustrated and removed from class For longer written assignments, (student) has difficulty completing writing assignments In all subjects (student) has difficulty 78 August 2016 learning and retaining new skills Disability-Related Needs Identifies why the student is not accessing, involved in, or making progress in general education

Why is the student having difficulty understanding written instructions in all content areas? Why is the student easily frustrated and removed from math class? Why is the student having difficulty completing longer writing assignments? Why is the student having difficulty learning retaining new skills in all subjects?79 Augustand 2016 Whats The Focus? Present Levels, Effects of Disability,

and Disability-Related Needs Present Effect of DisabilityLevels Disability Related Needs What . . . How . . . Why . . . Is students academic and

functional achievement compared to grade level peers? Does students disability affect the students access, involvement, progress in general education? Is student not

accessing, involved in, or making progress in general education? August 2016 80 Discussion of Disability-Related Needs Time to stop and think about: Why the student is not accessing, involved in, or

making progress in general education So the IEP team can plan appropriate goals and services August 2016 81 Disability-Related Needs Root Cause Analysis Ask Why Five Times h W

? y August 2016 Wh y ? Wh y ? ? y h W

Why? 82 Root Cause and the 5 Whys Strategy to Identify DisabilityRelated Needs State the concern (The student has difficulty understanding written instructions) Check that everyone on IEP team agrees Seek information and data that illustrate the concern Ask Why is this happening? (Why is the student

having difficulty understanding written directions?) Generate possible reasons . . . Ask the second Why is this happening? Continue asking why until the disabilityrelated need(s) is identified. August 2016 83 Example of 5 Whys Concern: Student has difficulty with written instructions Why: Student has autism (not sufficient) Why: When reading, student is not retaining information

Why: Given written instructions, the student isnt identifying the steps Why: Given written instructions, the student has difficulty remembering what to do first, next, then, . . . Why: When reading the student is easily distracted by August 2016 background sounds Disability-Related Needs

Following multi-step written instructions Focusing on reading when background noise is present Goals and Services Must Address These Needs 84 Example of 5 Whys Concern: Student is not reading grade level text independently Why? Student is not

comprehending material Why? Student is not reading the words Why? Student is not sounding out the words when reading Why? Student does not show foundational reading / decoding skills Why? The student has not mastered the relationship August 2016 between sounds and letters. Disability-Related

Needs Improve consistent and fluent application of decoding skills. Goals and Services Must Address These Needs 85 Disability-Related Needs Once the IEP team understands and can describe why the student is not accessing, involved in, or making progress in general education, they

have identified the disability-related need(s) Then the IEP team can develop IEP goals and services to address the need(s) and close achievement gaps August 2016 86 Disability-Related Needs, Goals, and Special Education Services Disability-related needs must be linked to ... IEP Goals: Knowledge, skills, or habits the studentEducation will achieve

when provided Special Services: instruction and support Specially Designed Instruction, Related Services, Supplementary Aids and Services, Program Modifications or Supports for School Staff August 2016 87

IEP Linkages Identify Needs Develop Goals to Address Needs August 2016 Align Services with Goals and Needs 88 Disability-Related Needs Tips Disability-related needs are not the same as the students

impairment area(s) or category of disability e.g. Emotional Behavior Disability, Autism, Specific Learning Disability, Speech and Language Impairment, Other Health Impairment, Hearing or Visual Impairment, Traumatic Brain Injury, etc. . . . August 2016 89 Disability-Related Needs Tips Be patient: it takes practice for IEP teams to improve discussions of why the student has difficulty accessing, being involved in, and

making progress in general education Use Summary of Disability-Related Needs prompt to pause, reflect, and summarize the 90 August 2016 why Disability-Related Needs Tips A disability-related need may explain the lack of significant progress toward meeting more than one academic standard or functional expectation e.g. Consistent and fluent application of decoding skills may affect several standards

e.g. Self-regulation may affect ability to engage in all content areas 91 August 2016 Step 2 Group Activity Identify Needs - Ask Why 5 Times The IEP team identified the following effects of disability Easily frustrated and often removed from class during academic subjects Difficulty completing assignments when reading text is required Think of a Student You Support who has Similar Struggles. . .

o Why is the student struggling in these areas? o Remember to ask why five times. o What are the students possible disabilityrelated needs? 92 August 2016 Step 2 Group Activity Disability-Related Need Elevator Speech Prepare an elevator speech that explains disability-related need What is MOST important? 3-4 main ideas What it is and what it is not Find a partner and give your speech Group discussion

August 2016 93 Individualized Education Program (I-4) Family Engagement August 2016 94 U.S. DOE Family Engagement Framework Dual Capacity Framework for Fami

ly-School Partnerships For schools and districts across the U.S., family engagement is rapidly shifting from a low-priority recommendation to an integral part of education reform efforts. August 2016 95 Promoting Excellence for All Strategies that Close Achievement Gaps Promoting Excellence for All Website August 2016

96 State Superintendents Parent Advisory Council Belief Statement We believe all parents want their children to learn and to succeed in school. Families are a source of strength and knowledge. Families are best able to help their children do well in school when schools accept families as they are and make frequent efforts to know, listen to, and learn from parents. August 2016

97 Understanding Diverse Families View of disability Family roles & responsibility Decision making Religious beliefs Language Access to information, resources, & services Additional stressors August 2016 98 Resources and

Networking Strategies Provide families information about . . . Resources from state agencies (DVR, DPI, ADRC) Community Support Structures (CCOTs) Support organizations (WSPEI/WI FACETS, WI Family Ties, ALAS, BPDD, Family Voices of WI) Peer mentoring resources (Parent to Parent, Parent Peer Specialists) Networking opportunities (Autism Society, Circles of Life Conference, Support Groups) Start a family learning center at school August 2016

99 Specific Skill Activities Strategies Provide parent with a few universal strategies to support literacy instruction in home and community

Introduce learning games and fun activities for families that support academic skills needed to close achievement gaps Consider games based on mastery or repetition August 2016 100 CCR IEP 5 BELIEFS Family and Community Engagement is one of the 5 beliefs of CCR IEPs

Want to Know More? Promoting Excellence for All resources on Family and Community Engagement CCR IEP modules on Family Engagement in the IEP available winter 2017 Title I Family Engagement resources August 2016 101 Participation in General Education 102 Different Types of Access

Access to general education curriculum and grade-level standards Access to regular education environment Access to extracurricular and nonacademic activities

Access to workplace settings August 2016 103 Access to General Education Curriculum Participation in general education curriculum (what is taught) General education curriculum = the

same curriculum as for students without IEPs Why should students with IEPs participate in the general education curriculum? So the student can meet the grade-level August 2016 academic standards that apply to104all Access to General Education Curriculum

The student participates full-time in general education curriculum aligned with the general education standards that apply to all students, or for preschoolers, in age-appropriate activities aligned with Wisconsin Model Early Learning Standards (WMELS) Or Students participate in curriculum aligned with alternate achievement standards August 2016

105 Access to Grade Level Alternate Standards The IEP team determines if a student with an IEP has a Most Significant Cognitive Disability and if alternate achievement standards are appropriate Most Significant Cognitive Disability is not the same as Wisconsins impairment area for Intellectual Disability August 2016 106

Step 3: Develop Ambitious and Achievable Goals Understand Achievement Analyze Progress Align Services August 2016 Identify Effects of Disability Develop Goals

107 Step 3: Develop Ambitious and Achievable Goals Develop ambitious and achievable goals that close achievement gaps and support the unique strengths and needs of the student. August 2016 108 Step 3: Develop Ambitious and Achievable Goals

This step covers IEP Linking Form (I-4) Sub Section IV. Measurable Annual Goals August 2016 109 Individualized Education Program (I-4) Measurable Annual Goals 110 Individualized Education Program Annual Review of IEP Goals

(I-5) 111 Individualized Education Program Interim Review of IEP Goals (I-6) 112 Step 3: Develop Ambitious and Achievable Goals Ambitious: Intended to reflect high expectations, challenges

the student, and accelerates progress toward meeting grade-level standards. Achievable: The goal is able to be met within one year August 2016 113 Step 3: Develop Ambitious and Achievable Goals IEP goals must be aligned with grade-level content standards Are not a restatement of

academic content standards August 2016 114 Step 3: Develop Ambitious and Achievable Goals IEP goals are developed to address the students disability-related need(s) Each goal is linked to at least one need Identify the need by number IEP goals address why the student is not achieving at grade-level standards or expectations

August 2016 115 Develop Ambitious and Achievable Goals Tips A goal may address more than one disability-related need e.g. A goal that states the student will learn to use graphic organizers to improve the students reading and functional disabilityrelated needs related for completing assignments August 2016 116

Develop Ambitious and Achievable Goals Tips Several goals may address one disability-related need e.g. The students need to improve foundational reading skills may be addressed by more than one goal August 2016 117 Step 3: Develop Ambitious and Achievable Goals Baseline: The students skill level at the time of

the IEP meeting Level of Attainment: The amount of growth anticipated within a year of special education services Procedures for Measuring Progress: The process or methods used to assess a students academic and functional performance during the school year for the purpose of analyzing the students response to special education services. August 2016 118 Goal Measurement Alignment The measure in measurable goals should align all of the following

August 2016 119 UDL and IEP Goals How might IEP goals include . . . Choice Links to functional engagement Promote self determination Focus on setting where skill is needed

During small group reading instruction, Keyondra will choose a positive behavior and self regulation strategy to self monitor and complete her small group reading activity 90% of the time. August 2016 120 Step 3 Group Activity Brainstorm Goals Consider the following disability-related needs: Following multi-step written instructions Focusing on reading when background noise is present

Develop a goal that is written in a way that could directly support one of these disability-related needs? What goals could address this students disabilityrelated needs? Use the IEP Goals Self-Check to assess your goals August 2016 121 Step 4: Align Services Understand Achievement Analyze Progress Align Services

August 2016 Identify Effects of Disability Develop Goals 122 Step 4: Align Special Education Services Align specially designed instruction, services, supports and accommodations needed to support the

goals and ensure access to the general curriculum. August 2016 123 Step 4: Align Special Education Services This step covers IEP Linking Form Sub Section V. Program Summary and include: Supplementary Aids and Services Special Education / Specially Designed Instruction Related Services

Program Modification or Supports for School Personnel August 2016 124 Individualized Education Program (I-4) Program Summary 125 Step 4: Align Special Education Services Special education services are identified to enable the student to

make progress towards their IEP goals Special education services are directly linked/address the IEP goals or the disability-related needs Special education / specially designed instruction must be included in the IEP August 2016 126 Step 4: Align Special Education Services IEPs must include considerations of ALL of the following components . . .

Supplementary Aids and Services Specially Designed Instruction Related Services Program Modifications or Supports for School Staff August 2016

127 Step 4: Align Special Education Services Students with IEPs are regular education students Discussions of supports available in the regular education environment with the general education curriculum start with Supplemental Aids and Services August 2016 128

Step 4: Align Special Education Services Supplemental aids and services / accommodations . . . Remove barriers to learning Increase access, involvement, and progress in grade level standards Improve effectiveness of general education instruction August 2016 129 Step 4: Align Special Education Services

Some supplementary aids and services, related services, and program modifications or supports for personnel may not directly address an IEP goal In these cases, it is acceptable to address the disability-related need(s) Identify the need by number Specially designed instruction (special education) must address at least one IEP goal Identify the goal by number August 2016 130 Determining Accommodations

Is the accommodation . . . Increasing access to general education standards, instruction, settings, or activities Helping the student be more independent Improving motivation and engagement Based on student choice and input Possibly available to the student in August 2016 131 Examples of Accommodations Academic

Accommodations Functional Accommodations Provided Text in Different Prints, Sizes, Colors Notetaking Assistive Technology Note Taker Audio Books or Provision of Text in Audio Format Highlighters and Graphic Organizers Visual Schedules and August 2016 Supports

Self Monitoring Tools Home Base Incredible Five Point Scale Coping Cards Adaptive Clothing Visual Schedules and 132 Supports Accommodations and Modifications Accommodation s

Program Modifications DO NOT Change Content or Required Skill Level of a Lesson, Activity, Instruction DOES Change Content or Required Skill Level of a Lesson, Activity, Instruction Accommodations ARE Some Modifications may Not Allowable in Federal Law for be as Accessible in Post Students with Disabilities in

Secondary Education for Higher Education Students with Disabilities Can Promote Independence and Self Determination August 2016 May Limit Independence and Self Determination 133 Supplementary Aids and Services and Least Restrictive Environment To the maximum extent appropriate,

children with disabilities, including children in public or private institutions or other care facilities, are educated with children who are nondisabled; and Removal of children with disabilities from the regular educational environment occurs only if the nature or severity of the disability is such that education in regular classes with the use of supplementary aids and services cannot be achieved satisfactorily. August 300.114 LRE requirements 2016 134

Access to Regular Education Environment Environment = Where the student receives services Students with disabilities are to be educated with students without disabilities to the maximum extent appropriate Students with disabilities are to be

educated in the least restrictive environment August 2016 135 Access to Extracurricular Activities Supplementary aids and services in the IEP must enable the student to participate in extracurricular activities and other nonacademic activities Some students may require multiple supports to access extracurricular activities The IEP must document any extracurricular

or nonacademic activities that the student will not participate and explain why August 2016 136 Access to Standards, Instruction, School Activities, and Community Peer Supports Benefit Neenah Student with Autism Jen Zettel, Post-Crescent Media, May 29, 2015 August 2016 137 Step 4 Group Activity

Brainstorm Services Based on the goals you developed for a student . . . What might be some services that . . . Enable the student to make sufficient progress towards the goals Address disability-related needs Reduce barriers to accessing standards and instruction Must include specially designed instruction August 2016 138 Step 5: Analyze Progress

Towards Goals Understand Achievement Analyze Progress Align Services August 2016 Identify Effects of Disability Develop Goals 139

Step 5: Analyze Progress Towards Goals Analyze progress towards goals to evaluate what works and what is needed to close the students achievement gaps. August 2016 140 Step 5: Analyze Progress Towards Goals This step covers the following new IEP

forms I-5 Annual Review of IEP Goals I-6 Interim Review of IEP Goals August 2016 141 Individualized Education Program Annual Review of IEP Goals (I-5) 142 Step 5: Annual Review of IEP

Goals Before developing annual goals, use Form I-5 to document the review of the previous IEP goals and progress Determine if the student met the previous years goals or Short Term Objectives (STOs), and if not, address through the development of an annual IEP This may include revising and/or adding goals and services to address the lack of progress August 2016 143 Individualized Education Program Interim Review of IEP Goals

(I-6) 144 Step 5: Interim Review of IEP Goals Form I-6 is used to report to the parent progress toward the IEP goals If a student is not making sufficient progress toward achieving their goals within the specified time period, the IEP team should consider revising the IEP to address lack of progress An IEP team meeting is not required if the parent agrees to the revisions

August 2016 145 Step 5: Analyze Progress Towards Goals Ensure data collection on progress toward the goals matches data collection methods for baseline and level of attainment Consider additional data collection (e.g. Portfolio) that may support self determination and student self-efficacy August 2016 146

Data Collection on Goals, Services, Supports, and Accommodations Inform Future IEP Decisions Strategies to collect information to inform future IEP decisions . . . Student portfolios Video samples

Proficiency anchors Student, family, educator surveys Comparing baseline data to data collected regularly throughout the school year Data collection on positive outcomes NOTE: IEP goals MUST be objectively 147 August 2016 measurable Step 5 Group Activity Revisions When Needed For a student who is not making sufficient progress toward meeting IEP goals, what questions would you ask or information

you would need to know to understand why progress was not made? How does knowing why the student is not meeting goals Inform how to revise IEP goals and services August 2016 148 Exploring CCR IEPs jeopardylabs.com/play/exploring-ccr-ieps College and Career Ready IEPs Guidance and Resources Where to

August 2016 150 For More Information Click on the Hyperlinks to Learn More Highlights of RDA changes to Sample Forms Detailed Explanation of RDA changes to Sample Forms Disability-related Need Affecting Reading Definition Family Engagement Guidance Sample IEP Forms Frequently Asked Questions Reading Teachers and the Provision of Specially Designed Reading Instruction as Outlined in Students IEP 151

August 2016 s For More Information Click on the Hyperlinks to Learn More Updated WDPI IEP Web Page (Fall 2016) You can also use the search box at the Wisconsin DPI Web Site http:/dpi.wi.gov/ August 2016 152 College and Career Ready IEP

Discussion Tool Enhances IEP Development and Planning Discussions Bridges IEP Forms with CCR IEP Best Practice Modules Used by Individuals or IEP Teams Resources for Families and Educators Supplements Local IEP Software Management Systems August Available January 2017 2016 153

CCR IEP Modules and Guidance Adaptive August 2016 Technical 154 Online Modules: Digging Deeper Strategies Identifying Disability Related Needs Reading and the IEP IEP and Evaluation Developing IEP Goals Review of IEP Goals and Procedures for Measuring Progress

Planning IEP Services Supporting Student Access to Standards and Instruction Self Directed IEPs Connections between CCR IEP, ACP, and PTP Connections to Educator Effectiveness Early Childhood CCR IEPs Addressing Behaviors that Interfere with Learning in the IEP CCR IEPs for Low Incidence Factors Influencing Academic Achievement August 2016 155 Training Plan Sample IEP forms summer and fall 2016 PCSA directions and standards spring

2017 Opportunities Leadership conference Regional training provided by RSNs Large district training Web-based training Guidance documents August 2016 156 Timeline 2015-16

5th and Final Year of Current PCSA Cycle Pilot Sample IEP Forms and RDA: PCSA 2016-17 Final Sample IEP

Forms May 2016 CCR IEP Foundations and Modules Prioritized August 2016 Training on RDA: PCSA and Sample IEP Forms Continued

Availability of CCR IEP Modules 2017-18 1st Year of Monitoring Using New RDA: PCSA Items January 2017 CCR IEP Online Discussion Tool

157 RDA: Procedural Compliance Self-Assessment 2017-18 School Year DPI begins monitoring using the new RDA: Procedural Compliance Self-Assessment Checklist (RDA: PCSA). LEAs conducting the RDA: RCSA will assess IEPs using the new RDAS:PCSA checklist, directions and standards, regardless of what IEP forms they are using. LEAs in the first year of the cycle will assess IEP records created after January 1, 2017. August 2016

158 Thank you for your time & participation! August 2016 159

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