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LEED Certification GuidebookProcess Management Guidebook forProjects in the District of ColumbiaGovernment of the District of ColumbiaDepartment of Real Estate Services(Formerly the Office of Property Management)Published October 2008

The mission of the Department of Real Estate Services (DRES) is to support the DistrictGovernment and residents through strategic real estate management, construction andfacilities management. It is compromised of four core divisions:Construction: The Construction Division strives to support the efficient provision of government services throughhigh quality and efficient stewardship of constructed assets.Portfolio: The Portfolio Division seeks to achieve the most efficient use of the District-owned property bymaximizing its application for agency facilities and reducing dependence on leased space.Facilities: The Facilities Division aims to provide a clean, safe and operational work environment for Districtagencies through maintenance, custodial, and repair services.Protective Services: The Protective Services Division is committed to creating an atmosphere of safety in DistrictGovernment facilities to ensure that all government employees and residents may conduct business without fearof harm.

PurposeThis Guidebook was commissioned by the District of Columbia Department of Real Estate Services (DRES) in orderto assist DRES’s Project Managers as well as external Architecture and Engineering service providers and Contractorswith achieving LEED Certification as required by the District of Columbia Green Building Act. It is intended to provideguidance, to facilitate the LEED process and to assist project teams in making sound economic and environmentaldecisions for LEED projects. It is not intended to replace the LEED Reference Guides, which are all essential toolswhen designing and building a project under the LEED Rating System, nor is it intended to replace the services of asustainable design consultant, should the project scope or complexity benefit from outside expertise. This Guidebookis intended to provide greater insight into the LEED process specifically for projects located in the District of Columbia.The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Rating System was developed by the United States GreenBuilding Council (USGBC) and the term “LEED” is trademarked. It should not be used to describe projects that are notRegistered with the USGBC, Certified by the USGBC or not intending to pursue LEED Certification. All LEED-relatedmaterials, such as the LEED Reference Guides, are copyrighted and should not be copied or distributed withoutpermission from the USGBC.At the time of publication of this Guidebook, the LEED Rating Systems referred to are: LEED for New Construction and Major Renovations v2.2 LEED for Commercial Interiors v2.0 LEED for Core and Shell v2.0 LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations and Maintenance LEED for Schools LEED for HomesCurrent LEED Rating Systems will be updated in 2009. All projects registered for LEED with the USGBC beforeupdated Ratings Systems are released will still be using the Rating Systems listed above, and therefore this Guidebook.AcknowledgementsThis Guidebook was created by Hellmuth, Obata Kassabaum Architects (HOK) in Washington, DC. The Guidebookwas written in conjunction with the design and implementation of sustainable strategies on the Consolidated ForensicLab project, a LEED Registered project managed by the DC Department of Real Estate Services. 2008 HOKAuthors and contributors include:Hellmuth, Obata Kassabaum Architects (HOK)Anica Landreneau, LEED-AP, Alesia Call, LEED-AP, Leigh Stringer, LEED-AP, Jodi Williams, LEED-AP, Todd Pedersen,LEED-AP, Megan Barker, LEED-AP, Danielle Caylor, Niall Cytryn, LEED-APGraphics: Jim Doussard, Jeffrey Wotowiec, Kerry AucampSpecial Thanks to:Mary Ann Lazarus, LEED-AP, Sara Graham, LEED-AP, Deborah Fuller, LEED-AP, Barb Ciesla, LEED-AP, Keith MacDonald,LEED-AP, Deborah Rutherford, LEED-AP, Lori Selcer, LEED-AP, Peggy Chu, LEED-AP, Joe Yang, LEED-AP, Dora Ng, LEEDAP, May Xu, LEED-APInstitute for Market Transformation (IMT)Cliff Majersik, LEED-APDistrict of Columbia Department of Real Estate Services (DRES)Gerick Smith, Ajay Kapoor, Thom Ennen, Curtis Clay, Brian Hanlon, Allam Al-Alami, Susan Riley, Daphne Hawkins,Mark Chambers, LEED-APLEED Certification Acknowledgements4

Table of Contents1. Introduction.62. DC Green Building Act 2006 & DC Clean and Affordable Energy Act 2008High Performance Building Standards in the District of Columbia.73. DC Green Building Code UpdatesCode changes that align with sustainable design and LEED criteria.104. LEED Rating System Overview.145. The Cost of LEED.176. Managing LEED Certification by Project PhaseLEED Implementation Strategy by Project Phase; useful for Project Managers.207. LEED Project Management MatrixQuick Reference for LEED Milestones and Responsibilities; includes designverification submittal requirements to DCRA to obtain building permit. 298. Steps to LEED CertificationDetailed LEED Process Information: when & how to Interactwith the USGBC and LEED Online; useful for LEED coordinators.309. Specification GuidanceHow to incorporate LEED Progress Reporting and Documentation Requirementsinto Contract Documents; useful for Owners and Specification Writers.4910. LEED General Resources.6611. Glossary.68Supplemental documents currently available in addition to this Guidebook:A. LEED For New Constructions & Major Renovations v2.2 (LEED-NC)Useful for Project design teams and contractorsB. LEED For Commercial Interiors v2.0 (LEED-CI)Useful for Project design teams and contractorsC. DRES LEED PoliciesUseful for all projects under LEED-NC, LEED-CI, LEED-EB, etc.LEED Certification Table of Contents5

IntroductionTitleof ImportantStuff & ThingsSubtitle of More Things and StuffsSetting the national standard for high performancebuildings, the District of Columbia passed the GreenBuilding Act 2006. This legislation is innovative inits combined mandated and incentivized approachto green building, as well as its inclusion of bothpublicly and privately funded construction and majorrenovation projects. Under the Act, publicly owned,funded or financed projects are required to achievesustainable building standards in the LEED and GreenCommunities rating systems (though many jurisdictionsalready require LEED in the public sector). In addition,the Act requires LEED Certification for privately fundedconstruction projects, starting in 2012. DC was the firstjurisdiction to enact legislation that mandates LEEDCertification in the private sector and quickly inspiredsimilar legislation in other jurisdictions.Beyond requiring compliance with LEED and GreenCommunities, the Green Building Act also requires theestablishment of a green building incentives program,a Green Building Fund to support incentive programs,a ‘greening’ of DC building codes, a Green BuildingAdvisory Council and the priority leasing of greenbuildings by the Department of Real Estate Services(DRES).Augmenting the Green Building Act of 2006, theDistrict of Columbia once again set the nationalstandard for high performance buildings by passingthe Clean and Affordable Energy Act 2008. Amongother requirements, the recently passed Act requiresannual energy performance reporting using the U.S.Department of Energy’s free, online Energy Star TargetFinder reporting tool. Publicly owned buildings of10,000 square feet or more must be benchmarkedand reported beginning in 2009 and commercialproperties of 200,000 square feet or more must bebenchmarked and reported beginning in 2010. Forcommercial properties, the threshold will lower annuallyby 50,000 square feet until 2013, when properties at50,000 square feet or more must be benchmarked andreported.Enforcement of high performance building standardsin the Green Building Act is the responsibility of theDistrict Department of Consumer and RegulatoryAffairs (DCRA), who will require compliance verificationbefore issuing building construction permits.Enforcement of the Energy Star benchmarking andreporting is the responsibility of the District Departmentof the Environment (DDOE). Relevant details ofthe Green Building Act of 2006 and the Clean andAffordable Energy Act of 2008 are explained in moredetail in the next chapter.The District of Columbia has set the national standardfor State action on reducing greenhouse emissions andimproving the energy efficiency of publicly and privatelysponsored new building construction and majorrenovations.This Guidebook and supplementary manuals werecommissioned by the District Department of Real EstateServices (DRES), Construction Division, to fortify publicproject managers and A/E service providers with thepractical tools to ensure that their projects reach thegoals set by the District.LEED Certification Introduction6

GreenTitleofBuildingImportantAct & CleanStuffAffordableand& Things Energy ActSubtitleHighPerformanceof More ThingsBuildingandStandardsStuffsin the District of Columbia1. Summary of Mandatory High PerformanceBuilding StandardsA. Effective in 2008:Affairs (DCRA) must submit a LEED Scorecardwith the construction permit applicationC. Effective in 2010:i. All publicly funded, financed or owned nonresidential buildings seeking a constructionpermit* must achieve certification under oneof the rating systems below:a. LEED for New Construction & MajorRenovations v2.2, Silver level or higherb. LEED for Core & Shell v2.0, Silver level orhigherc. LEED for Schools (K-12), Certified level orhigherii. All publicly funded, financed or ownedresidential buildings of 10,000 square feet ormore seeking a construction permit* mustachieve certification under one of the ratingsystems below:i. All properties purchased from the District(or acquired in a transaction where theDistrict was an instrument of sale) seeking aconstruction permit* must achieve certificationunder one of the rating systems below:a. LEED for New Construction & MajorRenovations v2.2, Certified level or higherb. LEED for Core & Shell v2.0, Certified levelor higherii. All existing commercial properties of 200,000square feet or more must be benchmarkedannually using the Energy Star Target Findertool, and scores must reported to the DistrictDepartment of the Environment (DDOE)D. Effective in 2011:a. Green Communities 2006b. LEED for Homes, Silver level or higherc. LEED for New Construction or MajorRenovations v2.2, Silver level or higheriii. All tenant improvements of 30,000 squarefeet or more in a District-owned buildingseeking a construction permit* must achievecertification under the rating system below:a. LEED for Commercial Interiors v2.0,Certified level or higheri. All existing commercial properties of 150,000square feet or more must be benchmarkedannually using the Energy Star Target Findertool, and scores must reported to the DistrictDepartment of the Environment (DDOE)E. Effective in 2012:i. All privately owned, non-residential buildingsof 50,000 square feet or more seeking aconstruction permit* must achieve certificationunder one of the rating systems below:B. Effective in 2009:i. All existing District owned property of 10,000square feet or more must be benchmarkedannually using the Energy Star Target Findertool, and scores must be reported to theDistrict Department of the Environment (DDOE)ii. All privately owned building projects of50,000 square feet or more seeking aconstruction permit* from the DistrictDepartment of Consumer and Regulatorya. LEED for New Construction & MajorRenovations v2.2, Certified level or higherb. LEED for Core & Shell v2.0, Certified levelor higherc. LEED for Schools (K-12), Certified level or higherii. All existing commercial properties of 100,000square feet or more must be benchmarkedannually using the Energy Star Target Findertool, and scores must reported to the DistrictDepartment of the Environment (DDOE)LEED Certification Guidebook Green Building Act & Clean and AffordableEnergy Act7

F. Effective in 2013:i. All existing commercial properties of 50,000square feet or more must be benchmarkedannually using the Energy Star Target Findertool, and scores must reported to the DistrictDepartment of the Environment (DDOE)* Construction Permit related LEED Certificationrequirements are applicable to all new constructionand substantial improvement projects. ‘Substantialimprovement’ is defined as any scope of work wherethe cost of improvements is 50% or more of themarket value of the property prior to its improvements.2. Summary of Expedited Permitting, as part ofthe Green Building Incentives ProgramA. Effective in 2009:i. All privately owned, non-residential buildingsseeking Expedited Permitting from theDistrict Department of Consumer andRegulatory Affairs (DCRA) must achieve LEEDCertification under one of the rating systemsbelow:a. LEED for New Construction & MajorRenovations v2.2, Certified level or higherb. LEED for Core & Shell v2.0, Certified levelor higherc. LEED for Commercial Interiors, Certifiedlevel or higherd. LEED for Schools, Certified Level or higherB. Effective in 2012i. All privately owned, non-residential buildingsseeking Expedited Permitting from theDistrict Department of Consumer andRegulatory Affairs (DCRA) must achieve LEEDCert