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INDIVIDUAL EDUCATIONPLANNINGSUMMARY GUIDE

CONTENTSIndividual education planning summary guide . 4Individual education plan resources .4What is an Individual Education Plan? .4Which students require an IEP? .4Why is an IEP important? .5Developing an IEP: Student Support Group .5Personalised learning and support planning .5Stage 1 – Assess: get to know the student and how they learn .6Stage 2 – Plan: use collaborative and student-centred planning approaches .6Stage 3 – Teach: make adjustments to meet the student's strengths and needs and overcomethe barriers to learning.7Stage 4 – Monitor and Evaluate: assess the effectiveness of the approach .7SMART Goals: Specific, Measurable, Agreed, Relevant and Time-bound.7SMART goals explained .8Examples of short-term SMART goals .8Department inclusive education policies and strategies .9Additional resources and related frameworks .9Related plans .10 State of Victoria (Department of Education and Training) 2020The Individual Education Planning Summary Guide is provided under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International licence. Youare free to re-use the work under that licence, on the condition that you credit the State of Victoria (Department of Education andTraining), indicate if changes were made and comply with the other licence terms, see: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0InternationalThe licence does not apply to: any images, photographs, trademarks or branding, including the Victorian Government logo and the DET logo; and content supplied by third parties.Copyright queries may be directed to [email protected]

State of Victoria (Department of Education and Training) 2020The Individual Education Planning Summary Guide is provided under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International licence. Youare free to re-use the work under that licence, on the condition that you credit the State of Victoria (Department of Education andTraining), indicate if changes were made and comply with the other licence terms, see: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0InternationalThe licence does not apply to: any images, photographs, trademarks or branding, including the Victorian Government logo and the DET logo; and content supplied by third parties.Copyright queries may be directed to [email protected]

INDIVIDUAL EDUCATION PLANNINGSUMMARY GUIDEINDIVIDUAL EDUCATION PLAN RESOURCESIndividual Education Plan (IEP) resources are available to support teachers and school leaders to: develop meaningful IEPs by applying a personalised learning and support framework monitor, record and drive student progress through SMART goals (Specific, Measurable,Agreed, Relevant, Timely) support students – particularly vulnerable and disadvantaged students who may have multipleplans – by reducing unnecessary duplication, loss of information or conflicting plans.The new IEP template and other resources are available on the Department IEP web pxIt is important to acknowledge that teachers and schools already undertake many activities thatpersonalise learning experiences for students, including existing Individual Education Plans. If yourschool already has its own IEP template, you can continue to use that template. The IEP QualityChecklist on the IEP webpage can assist with ensuring it has all the necessary elements.WHAT IS AN INDIVIDUAL EDUCATION PLAN?An IEP describes the adjustments, goals and strategies designed to meet the educational needs ofan individual student to enable them to reach their potential. An IEP is essential in guiding theeducational planning and monitoring of a student’s unique learning needs. It is the practice andprocess that will have the greatest impact in supporting students.WHICH STUDENTS REQUIRE AN IEP?IEPs are required for: students in statutory Out-of-home care (OOHC) Koorie students (in accordance with the Marrung Aboriginal Education Plan 2016 – 2026strategy) students supported under the Program for Students with Disabilities (PSD) other students including students with a re-engagement program contract.IEPs are highly recommended for: students with additional needs students not achieving to their potential. students at risk of disengagement.For information on the Department’s inclusive education policies and strategies, see page 9.4

WHY IS AN IEP IMPORTANT?An individual education plan is important because it: supports the school and classroom teacher to develop a meaningful learning program forindividual students and to track progress against SMART goals provides an opportunity to share information between school, student, family and other supportprofessionals helps schools to determine resources required to achieve the student’s learning goals promotes student confidence and engagement through involvement in the process .An IEP also serves to establish the process by which teachers and schools are meeting their legalobligations and accountabilities for students with additional learning needs under the DisabilityDiscrimination Act 1992 and the Disability Standards for Education 2005.DEVELOPING AN IEP: STUDENT SUPPORT GROUPDeveloping an IEP is a collaborative effort. IEPs are best developed by a Student Support Group(SSG) using a student-centered planning approach. Include the student (where appropriate), theirparent/carer/guardian, principal, teacher, and other school staff/professionals to ensurecoordinated support for the student’s educational needs.An SSG is required for students supported under the PSD and those in OOHC and is stronglyencouraged for any students with additional learning needs.For further information about SSGs and the SSG Guidelines, In a remote and flexible learning environment, you can convene an SSG using teleconference orvideoconference platforms, such as Webex or Zoom. Ensure a lead contact is nominated at thestart of the meeting to record the outcomes of the discussion a complete the IEP and that Minutesare taken and distributed to all members of the SSG.Ensure that interaction with families and information collected and shared, complies with theSchool Privacy Policy vacypolicy.aspx) FamilyViolence Information Sharing Scheme n-sharingscheme).PERSONALISED LEARNING AND SUPPORT PLANNINGPersonalised learning and support planning provide a framework to develop an IEP.Personalised learning and support identifies a students’ learning strengths and needs and guidesthe design, implementation and evaluation of appropriate and effective teach ing strategies andadjustments.Personalised learning and support consists of four stages, each outlined in the IEP Template .5

Stage 1 – Assess: get to knowthe student and how they learnBegin by learning about the studentand their learning differences using astrengths-based approach thatfocuses on positive aspects of theircapabilities, rather than what theycannot do. identify the student’s strengths andinterests and any challenges andbarriers to learning provide information about thestudent to support their educationneeds, including results of anyformal/informal assessments inliteracy, numeracy or socialemotional assessments,recommendations from alliedhealth professionals, data orclassroom observations consider the student’s current entrylevel skills. ask the student what helps them to learn; facilitate student voice through Amplify – a studentvoice, agency and leadership practice ify.aspxStage 2 – Plan: use collaborative and student-centred planning approachesPlace the student at the centre of the collaborative planning process. Plan opportunities for inputfrom the student, the parents/carers/guardians and relevant teaching and support professionals. collaborate with the SSG to develop goals that are Specific, Measurable, Agreed, Relevant, Timely– SMART goals (see information below) consult with others where relevant review the student’s learning environment identify long-term and short-term SMART goals.Long-term goals should be clear and simple and summarised into one or two sentences and guidethe development of the short-term goals, strategies and actions in the IEP. Short-term goals aredeveloped by identifying the sub-skills that are required to achieve a long-term goal.When creating long-term and short-term goals, you can refer to the Victorian u.au/.6

Stage 3 – Teach: make adjustments to meet the student's strengths and needs andovercome the barriers to learningCreate responsive teaching and learning environments and implement teaching strategies andadjustments that address the student’s learning needs and goals. Use the principles of UniversalDesign for Learning to provide opportunities and adjustments that accommodate different ways oflearning and address the student’s personalised learning profile an d learning goals. implement teaching strategies, adjustments or supports to support the student to achieve theirshort-term SMART goals apply Universal Design for Learning (UDL) principles: http://udlguidelines.cast.org Ensure that your teaching strategies, adjustments and supports include: how to teach the skill;how to provide multi and varied opportunities to practice the skill; how to reinforce the skill; howto include other members of the Student Support Group to target the skill.Stage 4 – Monitor and Evaluate: assess the effectiveness of the approachThe IEP should be reviewed according to the timeline as agreed to by all members of the SSG ,preferably once a term. During Stage 4, collect and examine data to determine whether theteaching strategies, adjustments and supports provided to students are effective. This informationalso helps shape the next steps in planning and delivery. determine whether the teaching strategies, adjustments and supports provided at Stage 3 havebeen effective and whether the student’s goals have been achieved make educational decisions based on the information to determine if the goals should bemodified, taught in different ways or changed and whether the teaching strategies, adjustmentsand supports should be continued, revised or replaced Consider what is working well/not working well.SMART GOALS: SPECIFIC, MEASURABLE, AGREED, RELEVANT AND TIMEBOUNDThe goals in the IEP should be SMART – Specific, Measurable, Agreed, Relevant and Timebound.The SMART goals should be described in a manner that includes observable actions, areasonable timeframe for accomplishing them and criteria that make it possible to measure theextent of the student’s progress. See table below:7

SMART goals dWhat is it exactlythat you want toachieve?How will youknow when youhave achievedthe goal?Does the team,includingstudent andfamily, agree onthis goal?Is this goalrelevant to theneeds of thestudent?When will thisgoal beachieved?The goal must bewritten in a waythat can bemeasured –concrete andobservable.Specify whatinvolvement thestudent had inthe process ofdeveloping theagreed goal.The goal shouldbear in mind anyfactors that mayimpact on thestudent’s abilityto reach thegoal.Having aspecifictimeframeprovidesmotivation to getstarted and topersist.The goal shouldbe clear andconcise.How often will itbe reviewed?Examples of short-term SMART goalsStudentAction e.g. whatand howConditions e.g.Success criteriawhere, with who, e.g. what doeswith whatsuccess looklike?Minhwill verbalise heremotional statein the classroomwith visualsupport andteacherpromptingon two separateoccasions eachdayby the end ofTerm 1.Ellawill independentlycount to 20 withone to onecorrespondenceusing concretematerialson 8 out of 10occasionsby the end ofTerm 1.Abdowill compare theliterary style offour authorsin English, usinghis notebook toaccess differenttypes of textsabout a topic ofinteresthe will completea Compare andContrastchecklist to 80%accuracyby the end of thefour-week unit.8By when

DEPARTMENT INCLUSIVE EDUCATION POLICIES AND STRATEGIESFor further information about Department inclusive education policies and strategies, see: Education for all: ges/Education-forall.aspx Inclusive Classrooms: learning/inclusiveclassrooms Students with a disability school policy ncipals/spag/part