Transcription

Design andEngineeringManualJanuary 2019

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIADEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATIONJEFFREY MAROOTIAN, DIRECTORSAMUEL ZIMBABWE, CHIEF PROJECT DELIVERY OFFICERDAWIT MULUNEH, PE, CHIEF ENGINEERWASI KHAN, PE, CHIEF QUALITY ASSURANCE AND QUALITY CONTROL DIVISIONU.S. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATIONFEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION

GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIADEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATIONFOREWORDWashington, DC is a thriving and growing city with a rich history whose continued success relieson its transportation infrastructure. Our transportation solutions require engineered designs thatare thoughtful of all users, contexts and the environments.The District of Columbia Department of Transportation (DDOT) Design and Engineering Manualwas updated in 2017 and again in 2019 after not having been updated since 2009. This editionupdates critical aspects of the manual to reflect advances in industry guidance, providesinformation on topics that were not previously covered, eliminates inconsistencies andredundancies, and updates references and coordination with other DDOT manuals. Thetransportation field is dynamic and continues to evolve, and therefore, this manual will beupdated on a recurring schedule to stay current.The users of this manual will notice several meaningful improvements to key areas. Forexample, Green Infrastructure has been incorporated into a newly formed, comprehensiveDrainage, Stormwater Management and Hydraulics chapter. Chapters on structures andgeotechnical engineering have been clarified and simplified, while new chapters such as ValueEngineering, Project Deliverables, Bridge Load Rating Analysis and Reporting, and IntelligentTransportation Systems have been added.DDOT believes in fair and equitable transportation decisions for all of the traveling public and allusers of the public space. DC is robust in supporting a variety of transportation infrastructure,public realm amenities, sustainable practices, and multimodal accommodations. We hope withthis revision, engineers, designers and consultants find an improved resource at their fingertipsto enhance the quality and livability for all residents and users. We also value your feedbackshould you identify potential improvements or recommendations that may be considered duringfuture revisions.Respectfully,Jeffrey M. MarootianDirector

Table of ContentsPART I – PROCESS AND PROCEDURES1Overview .1-11.1.1.2.1.3.1.4.1.5.1.6.1.7.2Project Development .2-12.1.2.2.2.3.2.4.3Introduction . 1-1Authority and Applicability . 1-2Document Language . 1-2Definitions . 1-2Future Changes and Revisions . 1-21.5.1.Policy Revisions . 1-31.5.2.Technical Revisions . 1-3Governing Standards . 1-3Design Exceptions . 1-4Introduction . 2-1DDOT Core Principles . 2-3Project Development Purpose and Objectives. 2-5Project Development Process . 2-72.4.1.Step 1: Planning and Programming . 2-72.4.2.Step 2: Environmental Approval and Preliminary Engineering . 2-82.4.3.Step 3: Final Design . 2-92.4.4.Step 4: Construction . 2-9Project Management .3-13.1.3.2.3.3.3.4.3.5.3.6.Design Team Structure . 3-1Risk Management . 3-1Quality Assurance / Quality Control Plan . 3-33.3.1.Quality Assurance Statement . 3-43.3.2.Documentation . 3-4Independent Constructability Review . 3-4Post-Design Support Services . 3-5Major Project Considerations . 3-53.6.1.Environmental. 3-63.6.2.ROW Acquisition and Clearances. 3-73.6.3.Traffic . 3-73.6.4.Structures. 3-83.6.5.Materials for Pavement . 3-9Design and Engineering ManualiJanuary 2019

3.7.43.6.6.Drainage and Stormwater Management . 3-93.6.7.Trees and Landscaping. 3-103.6.8.Utilities . 3-103.6.9.Agreement and Approval. 3-103.6.10. Community Involvement . 3-113.6.11. Maintenance Input . 3-113.6.12. Bike/Pedestrian Improvements . 3-113.6.13. Federal Lands Affected . 3-11Design Schedule Management . 3-123.7.1.Preliminary Design Review (30 Percent). 3-123.7.2.Value Engineering . 3-123.7.3.Intermediate Design Review (65 Percent) . 3-123.7.4.Final Design Review (100 Percent) . 3-133.7.5.Plans, Specifications and Estimates . 3-133.7.6.Final Bid Documents . 3-13Agreements .4-14.1.4.2.Entity Agreements . 4-1Utility Agreements. 4-2PART II - PROJECT DEVELOPMENT5Environmental .5-15.1.5.2.5.3.5.4.5.5.5.6.6Introduction . 5-1Determination of Environmental Action Types . 5-2NEPA Action Types . 5-35.3.1.EIS Action – Environmental Impact Statement. 5-35.3.2.EA/FONSI Action – Environmental Assessment / Finding of No SignificantImpact . 5-45.3.3.CE Action – Categorical Exclusions . 5-4DCEPA Action Types . 5-55.4.1.Exemption . 5-55.4.2.Environmental Impact Screening Form . 5-55.4.3.Environmental Impact Statement. 5-5Environmental Process . 5-5Other Environmental Laws and Regulations . 5-8DDOT Design Phase Value Engineering (VE) Program .6-16.1.6.2.Introduction . 6-1Definitions . 6-16.2.1.Value . 6-16.2.2.Value Engineering in Design (VE Studies) . 6-26.2.3.Value Engineering Change Proposals (VECPs) . 6-2Design and Engineering ManualiiJanuary 2019

6.3.6.4.6.5.6.6.6.7.7Community Involvement.7-17.1.7.2.7.3.7.4.8Step 1: Planning the Public Involvement Program . 7-1Step 2: Developing the Public Involvement Plan (PIP) . 7-2Step 3: Implementing the Public Involvement Program . 7-57.3.1.Website Requirements . 7-57.3.2.Print Material . 7-57.3.3.Project Documentation. 7-5Step 4: Ongoing Evaluation and Modification of the Plan (as needed) . 7-6Rights-of-Way, Certification and ty . 6-26.3.1.Federally Mandated VE Studies . 6-26.3.2.Non-Mandated VE Studies. 6-3Initiating a VE Study. 6-4Team Structure . 6-46.5.1.Team Leader . 6-46.5.2.VE Coordinator. 6-5Consultant-Run VE Studies . 6-5VE Process/Methodology . 6-5General . 8-1Overview of the ROW Acquisition Process. 8-18.2.1.Determination of ROW Needs . 8-38.2.2.Certification / Clearance . 8-48.2.3.Relocation Assistance . 8-68.2.4.ROW Changes .